Cubs

Bears Get Off the Bus Running

Bears Get Off the Bus Running

Sunday, December 6th

What a snooze fest! The rest of us left on the bus were still sleeping, but the Bears did enough in the run game to secure a victory. The gameplan dictated the Bears run the football. After all, the Rams are one of the worst in the National Football League at stopping a rushing attack. As a result, it opened up some things in the play action game allowing Jay Cutler to hit on their longest pass play of the season. It was a 71-yarder to Earl Bennett in the first half leading to a Bear's crucial field goal.

It wasn't anything special about the rush attack, the Bear's just stuck to it versus a Ram defense who much like the Bears defense, have worn down due to an anemic offense. The Bear's logged over 100 yards on 38 attempts with two new tackles who provided adequate pass protection as well. The Rams are challenged in a lot of ways which the Bears took advantage of enough to make some key plays. The biggest play was to Earl Bennet. Let's take a closer look at the play:

The Rams took a play out of the Bears defensive playbook showing the "Mug Look". It is a heavy Blitz look with linebackers in the A Gaps ( between center and guards) and both safeties up just behind the linebackers showing "Blitz 0", which is all out Blitz. The number zero just means no safeties in the middle of the field. Wake up! The game is over! You will at least learn football in this Blog, and not fall asleep doing it! In continuation, Jay made a great read recognizing the Rams were dropping to a Cover 2 shell (Zero, now 2, you got it!). Jay further recognized that MLB James Laurenitis has a tough assignment dropping from the A Gap into coverage deep enough to cover slot Earl Bennett, who was taking the middle of the field with speed. James had to hesitate further before dropping because the pass came off play action. Matt Forte faked the "inside zone run" to Laurenitis's side, he was in a bind and Jay knew it and thus took advantage.

I know it is the Rams, but it is this type of execution that must continue next week versus the Packers. Otherwise, all Bears fans will start to hibernate early. I guess a few catnaps never hurt. Even for Bears.

When Kyle Schwarber met new Cubs hitting coach Chili Davis: 'I don't suck'

When Kyle Schwarber met new Cubs hitting coach Chili Davis: 'I don't suck'

MESA, Ariz. — The first thing Kyle Schwarber told his new hitting coach?

"His first statement to me is, 'I don't suck.'"

The Cubs hired Chili Davis as the team's new hitting coach for myriad reasons. He's got a great track record from years working with the Boston Red Sox and Oakland Athletics, and that .274/.360/.451 slash line during an illustrious 19-year big league career certainly helps.

But Davis' main immediate task in his new gig will be to help several of the Cubs' key hitters prove Schwarber's assessment correct.

Schwarber had a much-publicized tough go of things in 2017. After he set the world on fire with his rookie campaign in 2015 and returned from what was supposed to be a season-ending knee injury in time to be one of the Cubs' World Series heroes in 2016, he hit just .211 last season, getting sent down to Triple-A Iowa for a stint in the middle of the season. Schwarber still hit 30 home runs, but his 2017 campaign was seen as a failure by a lot of people.

Enter Davis, who now counts Schwarber as one of his most important pupils.

"He's a worker," Davis said in an interview with NBC Sports Chicago. "Schwarbs, he knows he's a good player. His first statement to me is, 'I don't suck.' He said last year was just a fluke year. He said, 'I've never failed in my life.' And he said, 'I'm going to get back to the player that I was.'

"I think he may have — and this is my thought, he didn't say this to me — I think it may have been, he had a big World Series, hit some homers, and I think he tried to focus on being more of a home run type guy as opposed to being a good hitter.

"His focus has changed. I had nothing to do with that, he came in here with that focus that he wants to be a good hitter first and let whatever happens happen. And he's worked on that. The main thing with Kyle is going to be is just maintaining focus."

The physically transformed Schwarber mentioned last week that he's established a good relationship with Davis, in no small part because Schwarber can relate to what Davis went through when he was a player. And to hear Davis tell it, it sounds like he's describing Schwarber's first three years as a big leaguer to a T.

"Telling him my story was important because it was similar," Davis said. "I was a catcher, got to big league camp, and I was thrown in the outfield. And I hated the outfield. ... But I took on the challenge. I made the adjustment, I had a nice first year, then my second year I started spiraling. I started spiraling down, and I remember one of my coaches saying, 'I'm going to have to throw you a parachute just so you can land softly.' I got sent down to Triple-A at the All-Star break for 15 days.

"When I got sent down, I was disappointed, but I was also really happy. I needed to get away from the big league pressure and kind of find myself again. I went home and refocused myself and thought to myself, 'I'm going to come back as Chili.' Because I tried to change, something changed about me the second year.

"And when I did that, I came back the next year and someone tried to change me and I said, 'Pump the breaks a little bit, let me fail my way, and then I'll come to you if I'm failing.' And they understood that, and I had a nice year, a big year and my career took off.

"I'm telling him, 'Hey, let last year go. It happened, it's in the past. Keep working hard, maintain your focus, and you'll be fine.'"

Getting Schwarber right isn't Davis' only task, of course. Despite the Cubs being one of the highest-scoring teams in baseball last season, they had plenty of guys go through subpar seasons. Jason Heyward still has yet to find his offensive game since coming to Chicago as a high-priced free agent. Ben Zobrist was bothered by a wrist injury last season and put up the worst numbers of his career. Addison Russell had trouble staying healthy, as well, and saw his numbers dip from what they were during the World Series season in 2016.

So Davis has plenty of charges to work with. But he likes what he's seen so far.

"They work," Davis said. "They come here to work. I had a group of guys in Boston that were the same last year, and it makes my job easier. They want to get better, they come out every day, they show up, they want to work. They're excited, and I'm excited to be around them.

And what have the Cubs found out about Davis? Just about everyone answers that question the same way: He likes to talk.

"I'm not going to stop talking," he said. "If I stop talking, something's wrong."

Podcast: Which Blackhawks could be on the move before trade deadline?

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USA TODAY

Podcast: Which Blackhawks could be on the move before trade deadline?

On the latest Blackhawks Talk Podcast, Adam Burish and Pat Boyle discuss which Blackhawks could be on the trading block and what players are building blocks for the Hawks future.

Burish also shares a couple memorable trade deadline days and his “near” return to the Blackhawks in 2012. Plus, he makes his bold trade deadline prediction for the Hawks.

Listen to the full Blackhawks Talk Podcast right here: