Cubs

Blackhawks President & CEO John McDonough to be next featured guest on Inside Look

Blackhawks President & CEO John McDonough to be next featured guest on Inside Look

CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS PRESIDENT & CEO JOHN MCDONOUGH TO BE THE NEXT FEATURED GUEST ON
COMCAST SPORTSNETS MONTHLY INTERVIEW SERIES, INSIDE LOOK

Inside Look presented by Cadillac, hosted by Comcast SportsNets Pat Boyle, featuring John McDonough to debut Saturday, March 31 at 6:00 PMCSNChicago.com to provide additional web extras coverage of Inside Look, including extended video clips

Chicago, IL (March 27, 2012) Comcast SportsNet, the television home for the most games and most comprehensive coverage of the Chicago Blackhawks, Bulls, Cubs and White Sox, continues to delve into the lives of some of the biggest names in Chicago sports with its candid, monthly, one-on-one interview series Inside Look presented by Cadillac.

Debuting Saturday, March 31 at 6:00 PM, Comcast SportsNets Pat Boyle hosts an exclusive one-on-one interview with Chicago Blackhawks President & CEO JOHN MCDONOUGH. McDonough discusses everything from the challenges of rebuilding the Blackhawks franchiseto his pride and organization-wide appreciation for the teams Stanley Cup championship in 2010. Plus McDonough also discusses his successful tenure with the Cubs and much more.

In addition, viewers are urged to check out Comcast SportsNets website, CSNChicago.com, for additional web extras interview content never before seen on TV, which includes interview footage with Blackhawks Chairman Rocky Wirtz and Executive Vice President Jay Blunk.

Fans will also be able to watch every Inside Look guest interview online after it debuts on Comcast SportsNet. Comcast SportsNet will also re-air Inside Look with John McDonough on the following datestimes: Thu, Apr. 5 at 11:00pm - Fri, Apr. 6 at 11:00am - Sun, Apr. 8 at 2:30pm & Fri, Apr. 13 at 4:30pm.

Note the following quotes from Inside Look with John McDonough presented by Cadillac premiering Saturday, March 31 on Comcast SportsNet:

MCDONOUGH on the daunting task of rebuilding the Blackhawks organization:
The first couple weeks I would be driving home on the Eisenhower and I would be saying to myself, I think I made a mistake. Now, this was to myself. Because again, this was much grander than I thought and the franchise, I thought, needed a complete overhaul from top to bottom and I almost didn't know where to start. And I am thinking, we have to start from scratch and that, at that point, is exactly what we did. It almost became personal.

MCDONOUGH on the state of the franchise when he first accepted the job as Blackhawks President:
I didnt feel it was in a very good place. This was a much more daunting ordeal than I had ever anticipated, but not insurmountable. I remember, after the press conference, I gathered the entire organization or the people that were here at the time and I really remember the message very clearly - the expectations are going to be higher, the pace is going to be swifter and you are going to need to be onboardand as I looked out at this group, I could see in their eyes, a good number of them were not onboard. They just were not onboard. And then it got into that we had to make seismic, profound change. This wasn't an assignment. This was not an assessment where I could have sat back, looked at the terrain, kind of a two-year plan and report back to (Rocky). This was a 911. There was a great sense of urgency.

MCDONOUGH on thinking about the Cubs on his way down to the Blackhawks Stanley Cup Championship Parade:
I remember driving down to the parade with my wife and I remember having this moment saying, I really thought this would be with the Cubs...I really thought this moment would be with the Cubs. I will tell you something that I never said publicly before. In my mind's eye...I dont know why I had this indelible snapshot, but I did. In my mind's eye, about eight to ten years ago I had envisioned a fly ball to centerfieldCorey Patterson catches itnational bedlam ensues. The Cubs win the World Series and it's the biggest civic celebration in the history of sports. That is what I thought would happen. I believed that was going to happen. I never envisioned it would be with the Blackhawks.

MCDONOUGH on wanting the Stanley Cup Championship Parade to last forever & moving forward the following week:
While I was on the bus and there were a few million people at this parade, I felt how proud I was to be from Chicago and whether it's with the Cubs or the Blackhawks that I am really fortunate to play a small role and be a part of this. I needed to savor that momentI never wanted that parade ride to end. I wanted to continue to go down North Michigan Avenue and go down Lake Shore Drive and just go on forever. Unfortunately that couldn't happen. I remember coming back on Monday, the parade was on a Friday, and really sending a simple message to the staff, business operations and hockey operations - Party's over, let's move on.

Watch: Kris Bryant discovers that no one in Austria knows who Kris Bryant is

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RED BULL

Watch: Kris Bryant discovers that no one in Austria knows who Kris Bryant is

Baseball is America's favorite pastime. Not so much for the nations of Europe, however.

Kris Bryant, the Cubs' star third baseman and one of baseball's biggest names, took a trip across the Atlantic for his honeymoon and discovered that he's not quite as famous in the Old World as he is stateside.

Red Bull posted this video of Bryant interviewing locals in Salzburg, Austria, locals who aren't very familiar with baseball — or Bryant.

Bryant and his wife, Jessica, also got to wear lederhosen and visit a castle, getting the full Austrian experience.

So maybe Bryant isn't the most recognizable guy in Austria. If he's ever looking for reaffirmation of his popularity, though, all he has to do is walk the streets of Wrigleyville. Guessing there will be a few more people there who know his name.

Bears grades: No rookie 'freebies' for Trubisky, mid-game lulls reflect poorly on coaches

Bears grades: No rookie 'freebies' for Trubisky, mid-game lulls reflect poorly on coaches

QUARTERBACKS: B-

Mitchell Trubisky’s final stat line was fine, and merely "fine:" 18/30 (60 percent) for 179 yards and a touchdown, and six rushes for 53 yards and a lost fumble (that turned into a Detroit Lions touchdown). There were some outstanding throws and decisions made by the rookie, like his touchdown toss to Adam Shaheen and his athletic, instinctive 19-yard scramble on fourth and 13 in the dying embers of the fourth quarter. But there were too many poor decisions and missed throws — for example, two incompletions were the result of low, inaccurate passes (to Benny Cunningham near the goal line in the first quarter and to Daniel Brown on third and six midway through the third). Trubisky was only sacked once after being dropped 16 times in his previous five games, which was an encouraging improvement. He did some good things but admitted after the game he has to be better, and being a first-year starter isn’t an excuse: “You don’t get a freebie because you’re a rookie,” Trubisky said. 

RUNNING BACKS: A

Jordan Howard sparked a big day with a 50-yard run in the first quarter, and averaged a staggering 8.3 yards per carry (15 attempts, 125 yards). Outside of that explosive run, Howard was efficient and effective, averaging 5.4 yards per carry and getting in the end zone on a well-blocked and well-executed 12-yard run. Tarik Cohen played 31 snaps — he played 31 snaps combined against the New Orleans Saints and Green Bay Packers — and was effective both with the ball in his hands and as a decoy to draw coverage toward him on others. His 15-yard touchdown run and subsequent leap into the end zone tied the game in the fourth quarter, and he caught four of six targets for 44 yards. 

WIDE RECEIVERS: D+

There weren’t any egregious mistakes from this group, but Dontrelle Inman, Kendall Wright, Tre McBride and Markus Wheaton combined for 13 targets, seven receptions and 82 yards. That fewer than half of Trubisky’s pass attempts were intended for his wide receivers is disappointing, yet it's not surprising given the struggles this group has had all year. Inman ran a good in-cut route and connected with Trubisky on it to set up Connor Barth’s missed game-tying field goal, which was the highlight of the day for this unit. 

TIGHT ENDS: B+

Shaheen caught all four of his targets for 41 yards and a touchdown, and displayed some impressive chemistry with Trubisky, his roommate when he arrived in Chicago in the offseason. The Bears need to continue to involve their second-round pick more in the offense — him not being on the field during that last-ditch drive in the fourth quarter was strange given his production, and the wide receivers' lack of production, in the game — and he blocked up Howard’s 12-yard touchdown run well. Daniel Brown caught two of his five targets for 23 yards, including a 13-yard catch on third and 10 that sprung the Bears’ opening-possession scoring drive in the first quarter. 

OFFENSIVE LINE: B+

This group kept Trubisky upright, allowing only that one sack and scattering four pressures on Trubisky’s 30 pass attempts. But it was the run blocking from this group that stood out: Beyond the explosive ground gains it set up, the Bears only had two negative running plays on Sunday. Dinging the grade here are two penalties on Kyle Long, especially an unnecessary roughness flag that negated a 15-yard Trubisky scramble right before he lost that fumble for a touchdown. 

DEFENSIVE LINE: B

Detroit wasn’t able to run the ball, with Theo Riddick, Ameer Abdullah and Jamal Agnew combining for 62 yards on 21 carries (a shade under three yards per carry). But the defensive line didn’t do enough to disrupt Matthew Stafford’s rhythm, with Mitch Unrein recording the only sack and one of two hurries (Eddie Goldman had the other) from this unit. 

LINEBACKERS: B

Nick Kwiatkoski made the biggest play of the day for the Bears’ defense with his sack-strip of Stafford in the first quarter, and Christian Jones chipped in with a sack as well (Jones’ sack was key in that it forced the Lions to kick a field goal, keeping the Bears’ deficit within one possession in the fourth quarter). Both inside linebackers played well, the outside guys didn’t make as big of an impact: Leonard Floyd had four tackles, two hurries and one tackle for a loss, Pernell McPhee had three tackles and Sam Acho had one tackle and one hurry. The lack of a pass rush from the guys expected to be pass rushers kept Stafford comfortable in the pocket, allowing him to pick apart a Bears’ secondary that didn’t have its best day on Sunday. 

DEFENSIVE BACKS: D-

Kyle Fuller missed a tackle on Detroit’s first drive and was benched for Marcus Cooper in the second quarter. Cooper struggled mightily, though, playing too soft of coverage on T.J. Jones on a third-and-15, allowing a conversion that sparked a Lions scoring drive that ended with Marvin Jones burning Cooper with a double move for a 28-yard touchdown. Prince Amukamara was flagged for a pass interference penalty for the second consecutive week, too (last week’s against Green Bay was a questionable penalty at best, to be fair). Fuller re-entered the game and dropped an interception, too. The lack of game-breaking plays and the 120.2 passer rating compiled by Stafford combine to earn this unit the lowest mark on the team from Sunday. 

SPECIAL TEAMS: D

Barth’s missed 46-yard game-tying field goal wiped out some good things Jeff Rodgers’ special teams units did on Sunday. Explosive Lions punt returner Jamal Agnew returned three of Pat O’Donnell’s four punts for only 23 yards, and he averaged 18 1/2 yards on four kick returns. But the Bears, as a team, couldn’t overcome Barth’s miss — and at the start of that drive, Cohen probably should’ve taken a knee in the end zone instead of returning the kickoff from five yards deep in his own end zone to the Bears’ 17-yard line. 

COACHING: D+

Dowell Loggains opened up the playbook for Trubisky (and Cohen), and the result was the Bears’ best offensive effort of the year. At times, this looked like a completely different offense than the one the Bears’ ran in the first 10 weeks of the season, with some zone reads, plenty of shotgun snaps and well-designed plays to spring a 24-point effort. But as John Fox said after the game, the Bears are still susceptible to “siestas,” with those mid-game lulls proving difficult to overcome. The Bears have played 10 games in 2017, and not one of them has been a complete, four-quarter effort. That bigger-picture look falls on the coaching staff, and has greater implications than some questionable personnel decisions (like why Shaheen/Howard/Cohen weren’t on the field for the two-minute drill in the fourth quarter).