Hurd arrested on drug charges


Hurd arrested on drug charges

Updated: 4:17 p.m.

Associated Press
Chicago Bears wide receiver Sam Hurd was in federal custody Thursday, charged with trying to set up a drug-dealing network after authorities arrested him with a kilogram of cocaine during a sting.

Hurd was arrested Wednesday night after meeting with an undercover agent at a Chicago restaurant, according to a criminal complaint that says the player was first identified as a potential drug dealer over the summer as the NFL lockout was coming to an end.

Hurd told the agent that he was interested in buying five to 10 kilograms of cocaine and 1,000 pounds of marijuana per week to distribute in the Chicago area, the complaint said. He allegedly said he and a co-conspirator already distribute about four kilos of cocaine every week, but their supplier couldnt keep up with his demands.

Hurd told the agent his co-conspirator is in charge of doing the majority of the deals while he focused on higher-end deals, the complaint said. He agreed to pay 25,000 for each kilogram of cocaine and 450 a pound for the marijuana, according to the charges, and then said he could pay for a kilo of cocaine after he gets out of practice. He walked out of the restaurant with the package and was arrested.

The NFL said it was looking into the incident and the Bears said they were gathering details about what happened.

We are disappointed whenever these circumstances arise. We will deal with them appropriately once we have all the information, the team said in a statement.

Hurd was scheduled to make his initial court appearance later Thursday. It wasnt immediately known whether he had an attorney and his agent, Ian Greengross, did not return a message. The NFL Players Association declined to comment.

Teammates said they were stunned.

Its a situation that you dont, I dont, want anybody to be in, especially a close friend, a teammate that Ive been playing with now for four or five years, said wide receiver Roy Williams, who played with Hurd in Dallas before being reunited on the Bears this year. Especially a guy from Texas with a wife and a daughter. ... I know it has to be tough for him because he has his family.

Linebacker Brian Urlacher said its sad for Hurd, who he called a good teammate and good guy. But he said it wont affect the teams play.

Football-wise its not going to be an issue, Urlacher said. Well go out there and practice like we do every day and hopefully put it behind us when Sunday gets here.

Hurd, a 26-year-old native of San Antonio who played college ball at Northern Illinois, played for five seasons with the Dallas Cowboys and is in his first season with the Bears. He has contributed mostly on special teams, playing in 77 games overall with six starts and two career touchdowns. He has played in 12 games this year, catching eight passes for 109 yards.

The complaint says an informant tipped off authorities in Texas in July, leading to an investigation in which an unidentified acquaintance of Hurds negotiated for approximately five kilograms of cocaine on the players behalf. The acquaintance wanted to buy the drugs quickly to take it to a northern destination that same day, the complaint said.

The Bears agreed to a three-year deal with Hurd reportedly worth up to 5.15 million, including a 1.35 million signing bonus and base pay this season of 685,000.

The agreement was announced on July 29 -- the day after federal authorities say he had agreed to a consensual interview with Homeland Security investigators over 88,000 in cash that had been seized in a car he owned in the Dallas area. The money was inside a canvas bag that authorities said was covered in a plant-like material that tested positive for properties of marijuana.

The acquaintance told authorities that Hurd routinely leaves large amounts of money in his vehicles, while Hurd said the money was indeed his and that he had given the car to his acquaintance, a car shop employee, for maintenance and detail work.

Hurd showed authorities a bank statement he said showed he had withdrawn 88,000 from his account, but authorities said it did not reflect the transactions and amounts he claimed.

Linebacker Lance Briggs said the team was going to focus on practice and Sundays home game against Seattle.

You hate to see this happen to anyone. Thats just it. We all make mistakes, Briggs said. You dont go through a football season without distractions. Distractions are expected. This is a game where were professionals and you have to approach it that way.

Theres a sports side, theres a business side and then theres a personal side. And, when it comes to business as a professional, you have to take care of business.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Will Cam Meredith return to the Bears?


SportsTalk Live Podcast: Will Cam Meredith return to the Bears?

Hub Arkush (Pro Football Weekly/670 The Score), Mark Grote (670 The Score) and Mark Carman (WGN Radio) join Luke Stuckmeyer on the panel. Quenton Nelson works out at Notre Dame’s pro day. If he’s still on the board at 8, should the Bears take him? Plus the panel talks about the Cubs outfield heading into 2018 and if it’s time to shut down both Jonathan Toews and Lauri Markkanen.

Could Quenton Nelson increase his value by playing tackle?

USA Today

Could Quenton Nelson increase his value by playing tackle?

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Quenton Nelson hasn’t met with the Bears yet during this pre-draft process, and doesn’t have a local visit scheduled with them. But maybe that’s not too surprising.

Harry Hiestand has better intel on him than anyone else after coaching him for the past four years at Notre Dame, after all. 

“Coach Hiestand, he’s known me since I was an immature freshman that wasn’t good at football, until now being a lot more mature and responsible and doing the right thing and a good football player,” Nelson said. “He knows everything about me.”

Could part of that intel provided by Hiestand be that Nelson has the ability to eventually play tackle?

Nelson might be the closest to a “sure thing” prospect in this year’s draft, with his reams of dominant film and off-the-charts work ethic projecting him as an All-Pro for years to come. But that he plays guard is a stumbling block, given interior positions generally don’t hold as much value as tackles in the NFL.

So here’s a potential scenario for the Bears: They draft Nelson at No. 8 — which is still "high" for a guard — and plug him at left guard in 2018. They then, under the careful watch of Hiestand, slide him to tackle in 2019. 

“I’m pretty convinced that Q could do whatever he sets his mind to,” Mike McGlinchey, a first-round tackle in his own right who's Nelson’s ex-Irish teammate and workout buddy, said. “If that’s what teams want him to play, I’m sure he’ll take that head on and perform to the best of his ability.” 

Nelson, to his credit, is confident he could make the switch to tackle (he was recruited by Hiestand as a tackle, and began his college career backing up Zack Martin at tackle). He said the only team that’s asked him about it so far is the Cincinnati Bengals, though it’s unlikely he’ll still be on the board when they pick at No. 21. 

But maybe the thought of guards being significantly less valuable than tackles is slowly becoming antiquated in today’s NFL. Four of the top 10 highest paid offensive linemen, by total contract value, are interior linemen. Three of the top 10 offensive linemen with the most guaranteed money are guards, led by Andrew Norwell, who inked a five-year, $66.5 million deal with the Jacksonville Jaguars earlier this month with $30 million guaranteed at signing. Only one offensive lineman — Nate Solder, who just signed with the New York Giants — is guaranteed more money. 

Following the money, if teams are willing to splash down loads of cash for the best guards in the league, a team may be willing to spend a top-10 pick on a guard who could immediately be among the best at his position in the NFL. Or the calculation for whatever team drafts him may be this: Would you rather have him as a perennial All-Pro guard or "merely" a solid-to-good tackle? 

Regardless of where he ends up playing, though, Nelson is one of those supremely-talented players who takes the right approach to his craft — in other words, one of those guys you just want to get in your building. And while Nelson said he’d love to play for his hometown New York Giants — who could be interested in him with the No. 2 pick — he said getting to link back up with Hiestand would be an incredible opportunity, too. 

“That would be amazing to play for him,” Nelson said. “He’s the one that made me into the player I am today. I wouldn’t be here without him or be in any conversations in the draft without him, so it would mean a lot to play for him again.”