Bears

Mullin's 2011 draft capsules: Defensive line

Mullin's 2011 draft capsules: Defensive line

Wednesday, April 27, 2011
Posted: 10:39 p.m.

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

Fifth in a series

The Bears defensive line got two major talent infusions in 2010. One was the signing of Julius Peppers to the largest contract in franchise history. The second was the emergence of Israel Idonije, who was allowed to settle in at defensive end and produced eight sacks, matching his total for the first six years of his career.

But the pass rush was not at the level that coach Lovie Smith and coordinator Rod Marinelli wanted and something will be done. The question is whether or not the Bears can afford to wait for some form of free agency or do they need to address needs in the draft.
The Bears

Peppers and Idonije have the edges secured and 2010 fourth-rounder Corey Wootton is first-alternate after a quiet rookie season. There is always room for another edge rusher, and Idonije and Peppers are both 30-plus, but the Bears can win with their current ends.

Tackle is another matter. Tommie Harris Chicago career effectively ended several years ago and ended officially this offseason with his release. Henry Melton was a bright light that came on throughout the year, he is now above 290 pounds, and coaches believe he can be Harris replacement at the three-technique.

Anthony Adams in an unrestricted free agent but expected back once a signing period opens, and 2008 third-rounder Marcus Harrison is getting a last chance inside. Matt Toeaina played well enough to take Harris job and receive a contract extension but not well enough to project as more than quality depth.
Need: Green Bays Cullen Jenkins is expected to be targeted when free agency opens and he would be another 30-something force at tackle. But defensive tackle could well be the Bears first choice in the draft as GM Jerry Angelo is adamant about keeping a strength strong.

The 2011 draft

The draft class is considered one of the best in recent memory on the defensive linemen, so the Bears will have options at No. 29 if they elect to address that side of the ball sooner rather than later.

The trouble for the Bears is that the defensive line depth is at end rather than tackle, and the number of potentially elite interior players is small. What that means is that if the Bears do not move on one of the top few, their chances of finding a true Tommie Harris-type diminish significantly. Temples Muhammed Wilkerson had 9.5 sacks last season and may be the type of player the Bears can find after the first round.

Ends and at least two tackles, probably three, will come off the board early and probably before the Bears are within reach.

The Best Bets:

(Because the Bears emphasis is on defensive tackles, ends are not included in this Neither are Marcell Dareus from Alabama, Nick Fairley from Auburn, considered virtual locks to go within the first 10-15 picks, well before the Bear select.)

1. Corey Liuget, Illinois The Bears would love the draft to fall such that this interior disruptor came within range for them. Its unlikely but Liuget projects as an immediate starter in the Tommie Harris mold.

2. Marvin Austin, North Carolina Austin has moved up on most draft boards as teams look past his 010 suspension for contact with an agent. He has first-round talent and is another fit at the three-technique if he decides to play every down.

3. Stephen Paea, Oregon State Among the strongest DL in this draft and a reasonably productive inside force (6 sacks, 10 TFL in 010).

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider, and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Return of the Monsters of the Midway: Bears defense has huge day in win over Panthers

monstersmidway.png
USA TODAY

Return of the Monsters of the Midway: Bears defense has huge day in win over Panthers

Are the Monsters of the Midway back?

You wouldn’t be wrong for feeling that way after watching yet another strong performance from the Bears’ defense in Sunday’s 17-3 win over the Carolina Panthers at Soldier Field.

Highlighted by Eddie Jackson’s pair of 75-yard turnover-return touchdowns, the Bears’ defense had a second straight highlight-reel display on Sunday. In addition to Jackson’s takeaways, the defense also added a fourth-quarter interception for a third takeaway, sacked Cam Newton five times and kept the Panthers completely out of the end zone.

For those keeping score at home: That’s two full games without allowing an offensive touchdown.

And they did it all while constantly being on the field. Thanks to Jackson’s touchdowns, the Bears’ offense got to stay on the sideline more than usual, the Bears’ offense possessing the ball for fewer than 7 minutes in the first half and only 21 minutes and 25 seconds on the game overall. And when the offense did take the field, the results were poor, meaning a quick turnaround for the defense.

The overworked defense didn’t always keep the Panthers from marching down the field, but the Panthers never found the end zone, Newton’s inaccuracies assisting the terrific play of the Bears’ defense, which technically forced four turnovers, if you count a third-quarter turnover on downs.

And that’s all before mentioning that the defense supplied almost the entirety of the Bears’ scoring output for the day on Jackson’s first-quarter fumble-return touchdown and his second-quarter interception-return touchdown. Both went 75 yards as Jackson, playing a year to the day from the end of his collegiate career with a broken leg at Alabama, became the first defensive player ever to have two 75-yard-plus return touchdowns in an NFL game.

If you’re having flashbacks to the last decade, when Lovie Smith’s defenses had a habit of being bigger scoring threats than the offense, you’re not alone. Twitter lit up with Mike Brown comparisons for Jackson.

Great day for the rookie, great day for the defense.

No offense to be found

Meanwhile, the Bears’ offense did next to nothing on a day when the defense was excellent.

Mitch Trubisky was mostly silent in his third career game, the obvious exception being his 70-yard heave to Tarik Cohen. Trubisky’s deep ball landed in his fellow rookie’s hands, and Cohen did the rest scampering all the way down to the 5-yard line.

Of course, the Bears’ offense failed there, unable to cover five yards in three plays for a touchdown. Trubisky attempted to rush in on third down, racing to the pylon and diving for the score. It was initially ruled a touchdown, but a replay review determined he was down short of the goal line. The Bears settled for a field goal on that drive, and it was the only scoring drive the offense engineered all day.

In the end, the numbers were disgusting. The Bears accumulated just 153 yards, picked up just five first downs, went 2-for-11 on third downs and scored just three points. Trubisky barely even threw the ball, completing just four of his seven passes for 107 yards.

Good thing the defense was so good — and scored 14 points — because the offense was practically non-existent.

Eddie Jackson, you are ridiculous! Wild facts about rookie safety's NFL-first touchdown combo

1022-eddie-jackson.jpg
USA TODAY

Eddie Jackson, you are ridiculous! Wild facts about rookie safety's NFL-first touchdown combo

When you do something that’s never been done before in an NFL game, you’ve done something pretty special.

Eddie Jackson had himself a jaw-dropping day Sunday, returning not one but two Carolina Panthers turnovers 75 yards for touchdowns in the first half of the Bears’ Week 7 contest, the first time ever a defensive player had multiple return touchdowns of 75 yards or more.

The Panthers had little trouble moving the ball downfield on their first possession of the game, but quarterback Cam Newton’s option pitch was fumbled, allowing Jackson to pick it up and dash down the sideline 75 yards for a score.

Then in the second quarter, the Panthers got inside the Bears’35-yard line, only for a Newton pass to be batted up in the air by Prince Amukamara and land in Jackson’s hands. The rookie safety again ran back 75 yards for a Bears touchdown.

And how about this: Jackson's huge performance came a year to the day that his collegiate career ended with a broken leg at Alabama.

Some more wild facts from Jackson’s remarkable first half:

Incredible. And that was just in the first half.