Bears

SI's Payton cover story has shocking revelations

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SI's Payton cover story has shocking revelations

Wednesday, Sept. 28, 2011
Posted: 11:14 a.m. Updated: 8:37 p.m.

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com Bears Insider Follow @CSNMoonMullin
The current issue of Sports Illustrated contains an excerpt from the latest book on Walter Payton and its not very flattering. At all.

In Sweetness: The Enigmatic Life of Walter Payton, author Jeff Pearlman chronicles Paytons difficulties in juggling a Hall of Fame induction time that included wife Connie, from whom he was estranged, and a long-time female companion.

Pearlman also details some of the medicating that Payton did both as a player and after his career, including a cocktail of Vicodin and Tylenol as well as his keeping tanks of nitrus oxide in his garage and finding ways to secure Ritalin. Even darker, Pearlman quotes longtime Payton agent Bud Holmes and assistant Ginny Quirk recounting calls from Payton contemplating suicide.

Not a fun read, particularly nearly 12 years after Paytons death. Mixed feelings here: Why trot out all of this at a time when the person isnt alive to defend themselves? Then again, if someone is going to be deified, their feet of clay also can be considered fair game.

On Wednesday the Bears issued a statement regarding Payton:

The Chicago Bears had the unique honor and privilege of having Walter Payton as a part of our organization for over two decades as both a player and board member. We believe his competitive spirit lives with us today. When we take the field each Sunday, we represent the great players like Walter who helped build the rich tradition of our organization. Nothing will change our feelings for a man we have the deepest respect for and miss having around Halas Hall to this day.

Connie Payton and Walter's family also issued a statement:

"Walter, like all of us, wasnt perfect. The challenges he faced were well known to those of us who loved and lived with him. He was a great father to Jarrett and Brittney, and held a special place in the football world and the Chicago community. Recent disclosures some true, some untrue do not change this. Im saddened that anyone would attempt to profit from these stories, many told by people with little credibility. Thank you all for your continued support."

My family & I appreciate all the love & support. At times life gets hard; We will stand up & stay strong!

John "Moon" Mullin is CSNChicago.com's Bears Insider and appears regularly on Bears Postgame Live and Chicago Tribune Live. Follow Moon on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Bears information.

Bears do not believe Leonard Floyd tore his ACL, but expect him to ‘miss some time’

Bears do not believe Leonard Floyd tore his ACL, but expect him to ‘miss some time’

Bears coach John Fox said doctors do not believe linebacker Leonard Floyd tore his ACL, but stressed the 2016 first-round pick is still being evaluated to determine the exact nature of his knee injury. 

Fox, though, admitted Floyd is “going to miss some time” due to the injury, which was suffered when cornerback Kyle Fuller awkwardly fell into Floyd’s leg early in the fourth quarter of Sunday’s 27-24 loss to the Detroit Lions. Placing Floyd on injured reserve, which would end his season with six games remaining, is an option, per Fox.

“He’s one of our top players,” Fox said. “Obviously disappointing. He was having a heck of a game, he was playing extremely well. It’s unfortunate, but it’s reality.”

With Floyd out, the Bears are down to three healthy outside linebackers in Pernell McPhee, Sam Acho and Isaiah Irving. McPhee is third on the Bears with four sacks and 10 hurries, while Acho has half of a sack and four hurries this year. Irving — an undrafted free agent signed off the practice squad last month — has only played three defensive snaps in six games, and mostly has received special teams snaps. 

“I think (Irving’s) kind of caught our eye on some special teams, our fourth down things,” Fox said. “He’s played sparingly as an outside backer but he’s a guy that obviously we’ve had in the system and he’s been working and I think he’ll get more opportunities moving forward.”
 

With Connor Barth waived, trying to make sense of why the Bears signed him in the first place

With Connor Barth waived, trying to make sense of why the Bears signed him in the first place

The Bears addressed an open wound at the core of their special teams with the waiver of kicker Connor Barth and signing of former Kansas City Chiefs kicker Cairo Santos.

Not to spend too much time looking in the rearview mirror, but a question still lingers, the kind of inevitable second-guessing that follows any failed personnel decision, because so many of those moves made a lot of sense at the time: What were the Bears thinking when they opted at the end of the 2016 preseason to replace Robbie Gould with Barth?

An easy question to ask at this point, with Barth missing a game-tying field-goal try from 46 yards to leave the final Bears-Lions score at 27-24 on Sunday. It’s also easy to forget that Gould’s exit traced to a missed 36-yarder for a win over San Francisco to reach .500, followed a week later by a 50-yard miss for a tie to reach overtime against Washington. Even though Gould made his final seven field-goal attempts of that season, he missed two PATs during the 2016 preseason, reopening a confidence wound and sealing the deal, because when the head coach loses confidence in a player, that player is gone.

Easiest to forget, particularly right now, is that Barth converted 15 of 16 field-goal attempts in 2014 with the Denver Broncos — coached by John Fox. Barth was successful that year on four of his five attempts from beyond 40 yards, a range at which Sunday’s miss against Detroit left him 6-for-10 as a Bear.

Jettisoning Gould two years into the four-year, $15 million contract he signed in late 2013 wasn’t entirely about money. But it remains head-scratching if only because Gould was successful on 84.6 percent of his field goals in 2015. But in fairness to Fox, general manager Ryan Pace and Bears evaluators, Barth had been successful on 86.5 percent of his field goals (115-for-133) in the five seasons before the Bears signed him.