Bears

Tackling machine: Urlacher sets Bears record

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Tackling machine: Urlacher sets Bears record

Friday, Nov. 19, 2010
1:45 p.m.

By John Mullin
CSNChicago.com

Its official. The Bears confirmed to CSNChicago.com Friday that linebacker Brian Urlacher has passed Mike Singletary as the all-time leader in tackles with his performance in the 16-0 win over the Miami Dolphins. Urlacher needed 4 tackles to pass Samurai and was credited with 5 on the post-game stats sheet, with a few more usually turning up after coaches review of game tape.

Urlachers perspective? It means Lance Briggs is going to pass me in a couple years when I retire and he keeps playing, Urlacher said. Hes going to pass me. Records are meant to be broken. Its cool to have your name in the category; its in now with the guys whove played here and thats cool.

Clueless, anyone?
Not that they needed a whole lot of help from the Dolphins, but the Bears got little from some apparently brain-dead thinkers on the side of the Miami offense. Witness:

Miami quarterback Tyler Thigpen on why running backs Ronnie Brown and Ricky Williams, whove each destroyed the Bears in the teams previous two meetings, carried just a combined six times: We were playing from behind the entire time.

Thigpen came back a little later to recount the Dolphins halftime discussions: We were one score down. When youre down 6-0youve got to be happy. But evidently not happy enough to learn the lesson the Bears have learned since the off week: that running does matter.

Thigpens coach Tony Sparano defended the no-run approach: Listen, I mean, we only ran 48 plays. So it isnt about running the football. OK, Tony, but you note that the Bears converted 10 of 17 third downs, something Mike Martz acknowledges both supports and is supported by running the ball and avoiding third-and-longs. So oh, never mind.

How ‘spatula hands’ Adrian Amos is a perfect representation of the Bears’ defense 

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USA TODAY

How ‘spatula hands’ Adrian Amos is a perfect representation of the Bears’ defense 

Adrian Amos grew up a Ravens fan, and would go play football with his dad on a field in the shadow of M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. So what was the best game of his career on Sunday — eight tackles and a 90-yard pick six — carried more meaning for the Bears’ safety. 

“This was a dream come true coming back to play in this stadium,” Amos said. “That’s a blessing in itself. Not a lot of people from Baltimore get the chance to do that, to be in this stadium.”

Amos played nearly 2,000 career snaps before recording his first NFL interception on Sunday, when he was in the right place to snag a ball Kyle Fuller — another Baltimore native who was outstanding against the Ravens — tipped pass. Amos always was regarded as a sure tackler who could be counted on to stick to his assignments, but for whatever reason he never was able to get himself an interception. 

“Sometimes, I call him ‘spatula hands’ because he doesn’t catch a lot of balls,” defensive end Akiem Hicks said. 

“Akiem’s always got the jokes,” Amos said. Hicks never actually called Amos “spatula hands” to his face, and after dropping that line to the media, he told Amos what he said (“He’s got jokes for everybody,” Amos added). 

Homecomings and jokes aside, Amos is playing his best football right now, and that’s been huge for a Bears defense that’s needed to replace plenty of key players before the halfway point of the season. Amos, who lost his job when the Bears added Quintin Demps and Eddie Jackson in the offseason, is starting in place of Demps, who broke his arm Week 3 against the Pittsburgh Steelers. 

“At that time, there was a guy playing better than him,” coach John Fox said of Amos losing his starting job in training camp. “And, at this time, he’s playing the best in the group. And that’s why he’s playing out there.”

Amos played a grand total of one defensive snap in Weeks 1 and 2, but has played every single defensive snap — as well as 26 special teams snaps — in the last two weeks. He had eight tackles against both Minnesota and Baltimore, and against the Ravens, he notched a tackle for a loss and two pass break-ups. 

This Bears defense showed in the first five weeks of the season to be a “fine” group, one that wouldn’t make many mistakes, but also wouldn’t make a lot of plays. That changed on Sunday, with Bryce Callahan picking off a pass, Christian Jones forcing a fumble and Amos notching an interception. 

Like the Bears defense this year, Amos was a solid player who hadn’t made a lot of big plays in his career. And like the Bears’ defense on Sunday, Amos finally made a critical play when it counted. 

“It’s just a mindset thing,” Amos said. “Just staying focused. Stay confident in my ability. Just keep working, being aggressive, just put my head down and work, that’s all I know.”

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Should the Bears let Mitch Trubisky throw more?

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USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Should the Bears let Mitch Trubisky throw more?

Adam Jahns (Chicago Sun-Times), Ben Finfer (ESPN 1000) and Jordan Cornette (The U/ESPN 1000) join Kap on the panel. Justin Turner hits a walk-off 3-run HR off of John Lackey to give the Dodgers a 2-0 lead in the NLCS. So why was Lackey even in the game? How much blame should Joe Maddon get for the loss?

The Bears run the ball over and over and over again to beat the Ravens in overtime, but should they have let Mitch Trubisky throw the ball more?