Bears

Tebow the bully?

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Tebow the bully?

Tim Tebow is a bully. In all the nicest NFL ways. He picks on the little people.

Hell try to punk the smaller people, said Bears safety Major Wright, a Florida teammate of Tebows and who was occasionally a Tebow punkee at Gators practices.

His big thing is trying to stay in bounds. When hes going against a DB, he tries to run them over.

Tebow does more than try. He is averaging 5.7 yards per carry, highest of any player with the qualifying minimum of rushes, and that is with a longest run of a modest 32 yards. He already has netted more rushing yards (46) in 12 games than any of the previous four franchise highs for quarterbacks (all by John Elway) in 16 games.

Meaning: Tebow is punking a lot more than just DBs. And the reason is because at this point of his NFL development, he is as much a running quarterback who will throw as a passer who will run, much as Michael Vick was early in his career.

I would say hes a runner at heart, Wright said. He wants to beat you with his feet. If hes scrambling, we feel like hes scrambling to run the ball, like Vick used to do.

Dangerous assumption

But in life one is always better served to overestimate rather than underestimate ones enemies. The suspicion is that the Minnesota Vikings did a little of that, categorizing Tebow as a running threat, not a passing one.

And why not? Tebow has completed only 47.5 percent of his passes and thats with a 10-for-15 game at Minnesota in which he posted a passer rating of 149.3, second-highest in the NFL this season by a quarterback with at least 15 attempts.

He gets better as the game goes along passing the ball lately, said defensive end Corey Wootton.

Indeed, Tebow is the NFLs No. 3-rated passer in fourth quarters, which shouldnt be all that surprising given that he has engineered five fourth-quarter comebacks, tying the record for a quarterback in his first 10 starts.

Therein lies Tebows real danger.

He has good quickness and speed, not as much as Michael Vick, Wootton said, but his strength and ability to win a game, youve seen that for five weeks.

Nasty attitude

If Tebow seems to be running with some malice aforethought if not in his heart, then in his legs then doubters have no one to blame but themselves.

With naysayers, I want to prove them wrong and it fires me up a little, Tebow admitted. And the people that support me, I want to prove them right. Im not going to lie and say that doesnt fire me up, people saying Im not an NFL quarterback.

Thats been my dream since Ive been a little boy and I want to have fun living my dream.

Wright said Tebow was having exactly that, fun, when they were playing at Florida.

And hes really a good guy off the field, humble, definitely a good teammate, Wright said.

Even if youre a smaller people.

How ‘spatula hands’ Adrian Amos is a perfect representation of the Bears’ defense 

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USA Today

How ‘spatula hands’ Adrian Amos is a perfect representation of the Bears’ defense 

Adrian Amos grew up a Ravens fan, and would go play football with his dad on a field in the shadow of M&T Bank Stadium in Baltimore. So what was the best game of his career on Sunday — eight tackles and a 90-yard pick six — carried more meaning for the Bears’ safety. 

“This was a dream come true coming back to play in this stadium,” Amos said. “That’s a blessing in itself. Not a lot of people from Baltimore get the chance to do that, to be in this stadium.”

Amos played nearly 2,000 career snaps before recording his first NFL interception on Sunday, when he was in the right place to snag a ball Kyle Fuller — another Baltimore native who was outstanding against the Ravens — tipped pass. Amos always was regarded as a sure tackler who could be counted on to stick to his assignments, but for whatever reason he never was able to get himself an interception. 

“Sometimes, I call him ‘spatula hands’ because he doesn’t catch a lot of balls,” defensive end Akiem Hicks said. 

“Akiem’s always got the jokes,” Amos said. Hicks never actually called Amos “spatula hands” to his face, and after dropping that line to the media, he told Amos what he said (“He’s got jokes for everybody,” Amos added). 

Homecomings and jokes aside, Amos is playing his best football right now, and that’s been huge for a Bears defense that’s needed to replace plenty of key players before the halfway point of the season. Amos, who lost his job when the Bears added Quintin Demps and Eddie Jackson in the offseason, is starting in place of Demps, who broke his arm Week 3 against the Pittsburgh Steelers. 

“At that time, there was a guy playing better than him,” coach John Fox said of Amos losing his starting job in training camp. “And, at this time, he’s playing the best in the group. And that’s why he’s playing out there.”

Amos played a grand total of one defensive snap in Weeks 1 and 2, but has played every single defensive snap — as well as 26 special teams snaps — in the last two weeks. He had eight tackles against both Minnesota and Baltimore, and against the Ravens, he notched a tackle for a loss and two pass break-ups. 

This Bears defense showed in the first five weeks of the season to be a “fine” group, one that wouldn’t make many mistakes, but also wouldn’t make a lot of plays. That changed on Sunday, with Bryce Callahan picking off a pass, Christian Jones forcing a fumble and Amos notching an interception. 

Like the Bears defense this year, Amos was a solid player who hadn’t made a lot of big plays in his career. And like the Bears’ defense on Sunday, Amos finally made a critical play when it counted. 

“It’s just a mindset thing,” Amos said. “Just staying focused. Stay confident in my ability. Just keep working, being aggressive, just put my head down and work, that’s all I know.”

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Should the Bears let Mitch Trubisky throw more?

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USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Should the Bears let Mitch Trubisky throw more?

Adam Jahns (Chicago Sun-Times), Ben Finfer (ESPN 1000) and Jordan Cornette (The U/ESPN 1000) join Kap on the panel. Justin Turner hits a walk-off 3-run HR off of John Lackey to give the Dodgers a 2-0 lead in the NLCS. So why was Lackey even in the game? How much blame should Joe Maddon get for the loss?

The Bears run the ball over and over and over again to beat the Ravens in overtime, but should they have let Mitch Trubisky throw the ball more?