Bears

Why Dowell Loggains was pleased with what Mike Glennon did against Atlanta

Dowell Loggains was quick to point out the No. 1 positive thing Mike Glennon did against the Atlanta Falcons: “We didn’t turn it over.” 

Not only did Glennon not thrown an interception, none of his 40 pass attempts were dangerously close to being picked off. In one sense, Glennon did his job, and had the Bears’ defense not blown a couple coverages in the fourth quarter, he might not have needed that last-ditch drive that ended five yards from the end zone. 

“We talked about it all week, how important it was against that team not to turn the football over, because the way they run to the ball, they swarm,” Loggains said. “But to get it to the two-minute drive, that was our goal the whole time. We felt like we could win it in the end.” 

Loggians was happy with how Glennon executed the offensive gameplan, which saw the Bears only take one shot downfield (an incompletion to Tarik Cohen) and rely more on their running backs than their receivers/tight ends until the final few minutes. Until Mitchell Trubisky is deemed ready, this is probably what the Bears’ offense will look like.

(When Trubisky is ready is a separate topic, with the Bears continuing to praise Glennon’s ability to win at the line of scrimmage — the area in which Trubisky needs the most work — they don’t think he’s there yet.)

While the Bears only scored 17 points, here’s something else to consider: After one week (an admittedly small sample size), Football Outsiders’ DVOA ranks the Bears’ offense 10th. Ahead of them are mostly teams that won’t surprise you, based on Week 1: Kansas City, Oakland, Atlanta, Minnesota, Tennessee, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Dallas and the Los Angeles Rams. By the advanced numbers, the Bears’ offense was 16 percent better than average, which isn’t a bad place to start a season. 

Even if you aren't an advanced stats fan or don't buy those numbers after just one week, they are worth noting given Loggains' evaluation. 

“Mike managed the clock, managed the game, really managed the game,” Loggains said. “When I say managed the game — sometimes that phrase can be misconstrued — he did exactly what he needed to do to play the game we detailed out to him, how we thought we could win the game and what was best for us and that matchup, that game. He handled all the situations, did a really good job.”