Bulls

Bulls comeback falls short against Pacers

Bulls comeback falls short against Pacers

A rumor, a benching, a lethargic start and rousing comeback all took place in a matter of hours at Bankers Life Fieldhouse, all involving the Chicago Bulls in their second game in five days against the Indiana Pacers.

But it started with bricks and ended that way in a 111-101 loss Friday afternoon, as they were seemingly doomed by an early start that made one think if they knew what time the game began and were surely doomed when their inability to execute came back to haunt them.

“We had open threes that didn’t knock down tonight but I’m proud of the way our guys competed and fought their way back in it to tie the game,” Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg said. “Couldn’t just quite get over the hump.”

After coming back from a 14-point deficit, the Bulls tied the game at 95 midway through the fourth quarter, seemingly with enough momentum to complete it—on the heels of Fred Hoiberg benching Rajon Rondo for the second half after a minus-20 showing in 10 minutes of first half run.

A fourth quarter surge started with Cristiano Felicio getting a follow-up dunk and foul and a dunk from a pick-and-roll from Dwyane Wade. After Nikola Mirotic finally hit an open jumper, the Bulls found themselves trailing by five with 9:02 left—plenty of time to complete the comeback but perhaps not enough energy.

“It’s something where you gotta take it personally,” Hoiberg said. “About a week ago, it was us getting out to good starts. You spend so much energy getting out of it, you don’t have enough to finish.”

Perhaps if the Bulls found a way to keep feeding Doug McDermott on the offensive end, they could’ve stayed afloat as he went without a shot in the second half after going four for five in the first 24 minutes.

But McDermott also blew plenty of coverages defensively, drawing the frustration of his teammates and coaches in the moment.

“We better know what it takes to win games. We gotta be more focused in on our personnel,” said Jimmy Butler, who led the Bulls with 25 points. “We gotta be more focused on what this and that player is gonna do. We can’t take for granted we have good players who can score. Nowadays teams can score 120 points, we gotta lock in on the defensive end. We gotta rebound, it’s the little things we’re not doing that are changing it for the worst.”

When asked if the Bulls are becoming too comfortable falling behind only to have to make late comebacks, Butler couldn’t deny the evidence that’s been on display for several weeks.

“I don’t wanna say that’s what it is. (But) that’s what it’s trending to right now,” he said. “Is it fun for us? I don’t think so but we love to put ourselves in those situations. I can’t put my finger on it. The team that runs and wins the first quarter usually wins the game.”

The Pacers hit their first seven shots and took a 24-10 lead before Paul George finished the night off with some big buckets on his way to 32 points, a game-high.

“Poor start, poor finish. I think everyone wants to win,” Butler said. “We gotta play better in the beginning and down the stretch. We didn’t get stops, from miscues on defense. PG hit tough shots, that’s what he does.”

Missing shots is apparently what the Bulls do.

Mirotic went three for 14, including missing nine of his 11 3-point attempts as the Bulls shot six for 23 from long-range, playing from behind the entire night and never taking the lead.

Wade scored 20 with five assists, but the Bulls shot just 42 percent and surrendered way too many easy baskets to the Pacers as their rivals built a double-digit lead early.

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After the Bulls’ comeback, George slithered around the Bulls defense for a layup to put the Pacers up 102-99, after hitting three free throws from a foul on Butler with the game tied.

George, who was fined after saying the NBA favors other teams against the Pacers in the wake of the Pacers’ close loss to the Bulls Monday, went to the foul line nine times.

The Pacers nearly equaled the Bulls in free-throw attempts (31-30, Bulls) and shot 48 percent as Jeff Teague sliced the Bulls’ defense for 17 assists—partially a reason why Hoiberg could’ve pulled Rondo for the second half.

Thad Young scored 17 and Myles Turner scored 15 as the Bulls again found themselves playing behind the 8-ball—something they seem way too familiar with as this season progresses.

 

Joakim Noah has a new look and it's, uh, interesting

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USA TODAY

Joakim Noah has a new look and it's, uh, interesting

Joakim Noah played in only seven games for the New York Knicks this season, having last appeared in action on Jan. 23. A few weeks later, Noah was granted an indefinite leave of absence by the team.

So what's the former Bull up to now?

Well, apparently he's attempting to audition for one of the latest wild life survival shows.

In honor of Earth Day, Noah showed off his new look on Instagram:

Jah bless the earth

A post shared by Joakim Noah (@stickity13) on

"God bless the Earth and the trees and the sun," he says in the video.

No. God bless you, Joakim.

Why the Bulls should draft Deandre Ayton if they win the Lottery

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USA TODAY

Why the Bulls should draft Deandre Ayton if they win the Lottery

Something special occurred on the campus of Oregon University in late February. The Arizona Wildcats were in town, 24 hours removed from an ESPN report that claimed head coach Sean Miller had discussed paying $100,000 to land blue-chip prospect Deandre Ayton. The report shook the college basketball world, Miller took a leave of absence from the team and the Wildcats, ranked 14th in the country, became the lead story on sports talk shows for all the wrong reasons.

And the 19-year-old Ayton found himself at the center of the turmoil. Heading into Eugene, a place the Ducks were 31-3 at over the last two seasons, the Oregon student section mercilessly heckled Ayton all night, chanting “wi-re tap” and “hun-dred thou-sand” at the freshman star. The 7-foot-1 Bahamian could have crumbled in the moment. No one would have blamed him if he had.

Instead, Ayton dominated. He took over the game for 44 minutes, resting for 66 seconds in the first half before playing the final 26:37 of the overtime thriller. His final line – 28 points, 18 rebounds, 4 blocks – somehow didn’t do the performance justice. He made 11 of 15 shots, including 17-foot jumpers, offensive rebound put-backs, low-post moves and transition dunks. In a season of extraordinary for the Pac-12’s eventual Freshman of the Year and Player of the Year, that Saturday night may have been his most impressive, all things considered.

And it’s one of many reasons why, if that 5.3 percent chance becomes reality, the Bulls can’t pass on Deandre Ayton with the first pick in June’s NBA Draft.

Let’s begin with the raw stats. Ayton joined Duke’s Marvin Bagley as the only freshmen since 1993 to average 20 points, 11 rebounds and shoot 60 percent from the field. What’s more, only 10 others – regardless of year – had accomplished the feat, last done by Oklahoma’s Blake Griffin in 2009. Four of those 10 were drafted first overall (Michael Olowokandi, Tim Duncan, Andrew Bogut and Griffin). So, spoiler alert, there’s precedent for a dominant big man being selected first overall. Ayton certainly could join that list, which we’ll note has a respectable success rate.

Those offensive numbers were compiled in impressive fashion. Ayton has been blessed with a remarkable skill set for a 19-year-old. Per Synergy, his 1.16 points per possession (PPP) ranked in the 98th percentile, and he did while playing out of position most of the season; Miller insisted on playing Ayton alongside 7-footer Dusan Ristic, which clogged up the offense at times. He’ll have more freedom in the NBA.

There’s no denying the 260-pound Ayton was a force around the rim, using his NBA-ready frame to overpower opposing frontcourts; he shot 76 percent from inside 5 feet (200 of 263) and ranked in the 90th percentile in post-up situations (1.05 PPP). But his game, like his frame, is NBA-ready, too. Ayton displayed an above-average jump shot, shooting 38 percent on 104 possessions; Kentucky’s Anthony Davis shot 34 percent on just 67 possessions in 2012. Ayton also spent more time as a pick-and-roll roller (14.6% of his possessions) than Davis, Karl-Anthony Towns or Joel Embiid in their respective college years.

He also expanded his game out to the 3-point line, attempting 35 triples in 35 games. That may not seem like much in “today’s game,” but consider: Joel Embiid (1-for-5), Karl-Anthony Towns (2-for-8) and Anthony Davis (3-for-20) combined for fewer made and attempted 3s than did Ayton in one year; Towns shot 42 percent from deep this past NBA season, Embiid made 66 triples with the Sixers and Davis has increased his made 3s each of his first six NBA seasons. Shooting can be taught, and Ayton is already ahead of schedule, even if he’s going to earn his money 15 feet and in. Ayton will jell in an NBA offense from Day 1. His game was made for the NBA.

That physically imposing frame made him a terror around the rim. Ayton stands 7-foot-1 and weighs 260 pounds; only six NBA players were listed at that size or taller/heavier. Ayton is as physically ready a rookie as we’ve seen in a handful of years.

It also makes some of his defensive metrics perplexing. Ayton’s block percentage, per KenPom.com, was 6.1%; Towns, Davis and Embiid all had double-digit block percentages. Ayton was also a liability defending the post, ranking in just the 34th percentile (allowing .919 PPP). And though some of these ugly numbers can be attributed to playing out of position, his motor has come into question and he looked out lost at times on that end of the floor. It’s certainly an area he’ll need to improve upon; it’s not enough to say he’ll roll out of bed and score 20 points. He’s got the easy part down, standing 7-foot-1 with a 40+-inch vertical. A strong defensive-minded coach will do Ayton wonders early in his career.

So why the Bulls? Well, as you’ll read a lot in this series, the team needs an injection of talent. Team need isn’t going to come into play much after Cristiano Felicio averaged 17.8 minutes per game. The Bulls need talent, and Ayton defines that. It also fits that Ayton would make for a near-perfect 1-2 punch with Lauri Markkanen, a fellow Wildcat. Ayton saw significant time as the “hi” man of Arizona’s hi-low sets with Ristic. With Markkanen maneuvering the perimeter, Ayton would be free to work 15 feet and in where he’s at his best. Having Robin Lopez as a mentor for a year would only improve Ayton’s game, and his pick-and-roll numbers would improve with Kris Dunn, who made even Felicio look serviceable.

Ayton is the best prospect in the class. There isn’t much else to say. As the series progresses we’ll need to make stronger arguments for prospects, but not with Ayton. He’s the best center prospect since Karl-Anthony Towns, and his offensive game is ahead of any frontcourt prospect with two eyebrows the last decade. Prospects like Ayton come along once every few years (Towns, Embiid, Davis) and he’s as close to a sure thing as there is in this draft. If, 10 years after the Lottery gods smiled down on the Bulls, lightning strikes twice, Deandre Ayton is the man to lead the Bulls back to contention in the Eastern Conference.