Bulls

Bulls Season Preview: Improvement from Within

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Bulls Season Preview: Improvement from Within

Friday, September 25

Improvement must come from within

Despite a number of trade rumors this past summer linking the Bulls to potential deals for power forwards Carlos Boozer and David Lee, the front office chose to largely stand pat this offseason and look to the star-studded free agent class of 2010 for their next big roster adjustment. So, with Ben Gordon taking his 20 points a game to Detroit, and Luol Deng returning from the stress fracture that cost him the last six weeks of the regular season and the playoffs, are the Bulls better or worse than the team that took Boston to seven games in that thrilling series last spring?

Let's take a look at the team position by position:

Coaching
Vinny Del Negro figures to improve in all areas as he starts his second season as an NBA head coach. The Bulls did not run a lot of creative offensive sets last season with a first- year coach and a rookie point guard, but look for the playbook to be expanded this season. One of the major strengths of this year's team is its versatility. Several players can handle multiple positions, giving Vinny and his staff a number of ways to attack opposing teams. They can go with a big lineup, using John Salmons at the shooting guard position, with Deng, Tyrus Thomas and Joakim Noah up front. Or, they can try to use a speed lineup with Derrick Rose and Kirk Hinrich in the backcourt, and Salmons and Deng at the forward positions. First round draft pick James Johnson is also a versatile player who can handle both forward spots, and fellow first rounder Taj Gibson could see some time at center in certain lineup combinations.

The Bulls have added a "big man" coach this season to help the rookies, and the other frontline players on the roster. Former Bull Sidney Green will work with the talented young guys to try to refine and improve their low post games. And defending the post will be a big priority this season, especially after the way the Bulls were victimized on the offensive boards against some of the elite teams in the league. Having Green available on a regular basis should be a big help to all the big guys.

Former Bulls guard Pete Myers will take on an expanded role this season, replacing the retired Del Harris on the Bulls bench. Pete is very popular with the players, and is a hard worker who will spend extra time before and after practice with anyone who asks. The Bulls also hired former guard Randy Brown to work with the team's backcourt players in his role as a developmental coach. Bottom line, more attention will be paid to individual skill work, and that should pay off throughout the long NBA season.

Centers

This position has been a trouble spot in recent years, but it looks stronger than ever with an improved Joakim Noah and solid veteran Brad Miller penciled in for most of the minutes. Noah spent part of his summer working with coaches at the I.M.G. Academy to improve his jump shot and low-post moves. If Joakim can make himself more of an offensive threat this season, it will prevent other teams from doubling off him. Noah's confidence is high after an excellent playoff series against Boston. He appears to be ready to make major strides in his third NBA season. Miller brought a new dimension to the Bulls offense after he came over in the trade with Sacramento last February. The former Purdue star is an excellent passer out of the high post, and has shooting range out to the three-point line. He hit all kinds of big shots down the stretch and played a huge role in the Game 6 triple OT win over the Celtics. Having Miller around for an entire season should be a major plus for the Bulls. Del Negro went with Miller and Noah together for stretches of the series against Boston, and that could be a look he'll try again when facing some of the taller front lines around the league.

Aaron Gray is back for his third season to provide depth, and seven-footer Jerome James will get a look in camp to see if he's recovered from the Achilles tendon injury that ended his 2008-2009 season. If nothing else, James' expiring contract could come into play as we approach the trading deadline in February.
Forwards

The return of a healthy Luol Deng could be the key to the Bulls season. Deng told me he's been playing fullcourt games with teammates at the Berto Center and he's confident he's fully recovered from that stress fracture to his right leg. If Luol can return to the form that lead everyone to call him a future All-Star following the playoff series win over Miami in 2007, the Bulls will have a well-rounded offense with several go-to options down the stretch. But, if he struggles through another injury-plagued season, the Bulls might not be able to come up with enough frontcourt scoring to take pressure off Derrick Rose and John Salmons. Tyrus Thomas is back to start at power forward and says he's ready for his best season yet after a productive summer workout program. Thomas has frustrated two different coaching staffs with his inconsistency and reluctance to accept constructive criticism, but entering his fourth NBA season, he wants to show the league he's finally ready to reach his potential. Add in the fact Tyrus is playing for a contract this season and you've got the perfect formula for a breakout year.

The Bulls are intrigued by James Johnson's potential. He's a tweener at 6-8, 260 pounds, but he has the quickness and outside shooting ability to give Deng some rest at the small forward spot and he has the size to backup Thomas at the power forward position. Look for Johnson to get more minutes as the season goes on. Taj Gibson might have trouble earning regular playing time. He played in the low post at USC, but doesn't have the strength to bang with centers in the pros. Still his wiry frame reminds me of former Bull and Piston big man John Salley, and he should be able to contribute as a shot-blocker and defensive specialist off the bench.

Guards

This position figures to be the strength of the team, and why not, with Rookie of the Year Derrick Rose back for his second season with an improved jump shot and a burning desire to improve his defense and late-game decision making. Rose trained with the U.S. Olympic developmental team this summer, and spent countless hours in the gym working on his mid-range jumper. If Derrick consistently hits the 18 to 20 foot shot, opposing defenders will have no chance to guard him. He's easily one of the fastest players in the league, and his first step quickness is off the charts. Once he gets in the paint, he has opposing defenses at his mercy, since he can finish with either hand, and is a very willing passer, unselfishly setting up teammates for easy shots. Plus, Rose has been a winner at every level and his desire to be the best reminds me of a young Michael Jordan.

John Salmons moves to the shooting guard position this season to replace Ben Gordon. Salmons averaged 18 points a game after coming over in the trade with Sacramento, and he lit up Boston during the playoffs with his versatile offensive game. Salmons will be able to take smaller guards into the post, and he'll take advantage of Rose's penetration skills to hit open jumpers from everywhere on the floor, including beyond the three-point line. Salmons is coming off his best season as a pro and there's no reason to think he won't be even better this year. He'll also get some minutes at the small forward spot.

Depth won't be a problem with Captain Kirk Hinrich ready for back-up duty at both guard spots. The Bulls weren't quite the same when Hinrich was sidelined with a thumb injury last season, and his steady play was a big asset in the drive for the playoffs. Hinrich can run the team when Rose is resting and he has the ability to score points in bunches with his long range shooting and ability to drive to the basket. The Bulls also brought back Chicago native Jannero Pargo as a free agent. Pargo is capable of running off 10 to 12 points in limited playing time, and he should get plenty of open three-point shots when paired with Rose in the backcourt. Ageless vet Lindsey Hunter is also back to continue his mentoring of Rose while serving as an "unofficial" assistant coach.

Overview

It's hard to say if the Bulls will be able to improve on last year's 41-41 record and 7th place finish in the Eastern Conference. Teams like Washington and Toronto look to be a lot stronger after missing the playoffs last season and Charlotte and Indiana will be more competitive than what we've seen in recent years. The Bulls are counting on improved play from Rose, Noah and Thomas to go along with a healthy Deng, and savvy vets Salmons, Miller and Hinrich. If the coaches' emphasis on improved defensive play comes to fruition, the Bulls could challenge Atlanta and Miami for the 4th seed in the East. But if Deng isn't 100 percent, and the defense is still shaky, the Bulls could find themselves out of the playoffs and that would be a huge blow to their plans of attracting a premiere free agent next summer. It will be exciting to watch what kind of jump Rose makes in year 2, let's just hope he's playing in meaningful games down the stretch.

Does Rodney Hood make sense for the Bulls?

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USA TODAY

Does Rodney Hood make sense for the Bulls?

New York Times veteran NBA writer Marc Stein tweeted late Friday that multiple teams were interested in fourth-year swingman Rodney Hood.

We know that the Jazz are one of the rumored teams interested in embattled forward Niko Mirotic and while it wouldn’t seem to make sense on the surface, Rodney Hood could be a good fit for the Bulls.

Hood will be a restricted free agent this summer and the Bulls would retain the rights to match any offer if they felt like the former Duke Blue Devil was the right piece to join the new core of Zach LaVine, Lauri Markkanen, and Kris Dunn.

There is one complication in a potential Mirotic for Hood deal; the salaries don’t quite match. Utah would need to send another player like Alec Burks to Chicago in the deal. The Bulls would have to be OK taking on Burks’ $11.5 million salary for the 2018-19 season and his cap hit in free agency. Good news though, the free agent class this summer is very thin at small forward, the main position the Bulls have a need for.

Another road block, the Bulls are set to max out LaVine this July, and they may be wary on tying up a good part of their cap space for the next four years on two players.

Acquiring Hood hurts the ‘tank’ but you’d have a three-month audition of a 25-year old shooter that on paper would seem to work with the current rotation. If the Bulls felt like Hood wasn’t a good fit, let him walk in free agency. They would then keep their cap space intact for the 2019 super free agent class.

Bulls thankful Kris Dunn's injury wasn't worse; Zach LaVine cleared for extended minutes

Bulls thankful Kris Dunn's injury wasn't worse; Zach LaVine cleared for extended minutes

The fall was nasty and the concussion was substantial for Kris Dunn. But at second blush the Bulls are thankful it wasn’t worse.

Given the way his body jerked after Dunn released himself from the rim, the Bulls are glad he didn’t suffer a neck injury in addition to the concussion and dislocated front teeth.

“It could have been a major, major injury,” Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg said. “Obviously, it is a significant one with the concussion. You can't take these things lightly, but with the way that he fell and hit head first, we're really thankful that he'll be back hopefully before too long. But obviously we'll take things very cautiously, a cautious approach with this because of how significant concussions are. But hopefully we'll get him back soon.”

Dunn has braces on the front teeth to stabilize them, and Hoiberg said he’ll see the doctor every day over the next several days, per the league's concussion protocol. There’s a chance Dunn could join the Bulls on the three-game road trip, but he’ll miss at least Saturday’s game in Atlanta. The Bulls travel to New Orleans on Monday and Philadelphia on Wednesday.

It’s the second freak injury Dunn has suffered this season, in addition to dislocating his finger in the preseason. He struggled with it initially upon returning but recently had shown no signs of issues with it.

Dealing with a concussion and also a mouth injury makes things more complicated as far as his playing style. He plays aggressive and fast, bordering on recklessness occasionally.

Hoiberg doesn’t believe that will change when Dunn returns.

“I don't think it's going to change the way Kris plays,” Hoiberg said. “Obviously it was very unfortunate in the timing because he had a couple of really good plays there to get things really turned in our favor and get the momentum going down the stretch and they get a called timeout and get a layup out of it right away. Then we still had our chances late in that game. Kris was responsible as anybody for getting that game to striking distance. Unfortunately, we just couldn't make the plays we needed to to get the win.”

The more conservative style of Jerian Grant will take over in Dunn’s absence. Grant has been steady as a backup, averaging 7.6 points and 4.6 assists. Unlike Dunn, though, Grant hasn’t had issues with turnovers, at a four-to-one assist-to-turnover ratio this year.

Teams will dare Grant to beat them from the outside, as he’s missed 15 of his 16 3-point attempts this month.

“I've been here before, so I'm prepared. I've started a lot of games so far in my career, so I'm ready for it,” Grant said. “The last time I started, we got a win. I did what I had to do so I'm prepared to do whatever we need to do to get a win.”

Where Grant will receive relief is from Zach LaVine getting clearance for more minutes, as he’ll play in the fourth quarters and will have his minute-restriction increased to 24 minutes.

LaVine will likely play some point guard during stretches, and is shooting 38.5 percent from 3-point range in the small sample size of three games and 19.7 minutes.

“We're not going to overextend him right now because he's still obviously very early in the process as far as getting back on the floor and getting in game shape,” Hoiberg said. “We don't want to get him fatigued out there so we'll keep his rotation stretches short. But wee will hopefully have him available some in the fourth quarter to give us what Kris does down the stretch, who's been as good as anybody on our team as far as helping out close games.”