Bulls

Dwyane Wade's 'perfect storm' makes his debut a dramatic one in Bulls' win

Dwyane Wade's 'perfect storm' makes his debut a dramatic one in Bulls' win

The dream opening was turning into a nightmare as the ball rolled out to Dwyane Wade in the corner with the shot clock headed toward danger zone and the Bulls already living there for the last several minutes.

Three seconds later, Wade was signaling to the United Center crowd that it was okay to exhale after a contested, step-back triple over Avery Bradley with 26.3 seconds left, giving the Bulls a five-point lead in their season-opening 105-99 win over the Boston Celtics Thursday night.

“I saw Jimmy (Butler) going to the basket, I saw he was gonna make the pass but they stripped it and it rolled right to me,” Wade said. “It was like the perfect storm.”

After the clinching thunder clap, Wade strutted up the floor and gave a throat-slashing sign that will likely earn him a trip to the Principal’s office—but he’ll take the fine as long as it comes with the result.

“When I released it, I ain’t gonna say I knew it was going in because anything can happen but I felt very good about the shot,” Wade said. “It was a moment where a lot of emotion ran through me.

“I was excited, man. It’s opening night. It’s my first game back home and to be able to make a shot like that to help us get that win, yes I was very excited.”

Moments later, he trailed Gerald Green down the sideline before the ensuing inbounds pass, telling the Celtic some things he certainly didn’t want to hear before stripping Green of his 3-point attempt and knocking it off Green’s hands to stymie Boston’s last best chance at keeping itself in the game.

It was a small reminder that just in case the Chicago Cubs need some help in the ninth inning Friday night, The Closer can step into the phone booth and save the day as Wade the defensive play capped off his night with 22 points, six rebounds and five assists.

“Gerald, that’s my guy, we played together in Miami last year,” Wade said to CSNChicago.com after the win. “Rondo and Butler wanted me to help off and he knew it, so he started talking back after I said something. I told him he wasn’t gonna get that shot off.”

Green proved Wade’s words to be prophetic as he performed yet another magical act in 32 minutes of run, on a night that began with him on his knees as he was introduced to the crowd for the first time in a game that mattered—in front of his parents, family and friends, an event three decades in the making.

“I took that moment in the introduction, I’ve been waiting on that moment for a long time,” Wade said. “It was special for my family. They’ve been waiting just as long. I took the opportunity to thank God to be here. To have this career that I have, to make this decision on my own. I just took in a moment and then, it was game time.”

[SHOP: Gear up, Bulls fans!]

Wasting no time, Wade hit three triples in the first half—nearly halfway to last year’s season total (seven)—as the Bulls jumped out to a 15-point lead.

“Just tweaking a couple things and not redoing (his shot),” said Bulls coach and de-facto shot doctor Fred Hoiberg. “He’s bought into it. And for a guy that’s been in the league as long as he has, that says a lot about him that he’s willing to work and add an element to his game.”

Wade, Butler and Rondo were a big reason why the Bulls shot a surprising 44 percent from long range, which masked their overall bad shooting night of 39 percent compared to the Celtics making half of their 76 attempts.

Butler led the Bulls with 24 points and seven rebounds in 36 minutes, as the night began with a bang but nearly fizzled after the Bulls blew a 15-point lead—with the Celtics threatening to ruin a festive and hopeful atmosphere.

Celtics guard Isaiah Thomas lived up to his namesake, nearly becoming a Bulls’ killer with 25 points on just 15 shots, carrying the Celtics’ offense as it rallied to take advantage of a stagnant Bulls’ showing before Wade saved the night.

The Celtics methodically got themselves together in the third quarter, as Thomas’ triple gave them a 69-68 lead with less than five minutes to play. Bradley scored 16 and Jae Crowder scored 14 for the Celtics, as they held Al Horford to just 11 with seven rebounds in 30 minutes.

Taj Gibson and Michael Carter-Williams took turns charging up the Bulls’ offense, particularly Gibson with his 18 points and 10 rebounds in 27 minutes.

The Bulls had an outsized rebounding advantage, 55-36 with seven players grabbing six rebounds or more to help Gibson and Robin Lopez, with the 18 offensive rebounds leading to more margins for error.

“We know in order for us to make the game so much easier, everybody has to touch the ball, everybody has to have that chance of being guarded,” Butler said. “As long as you move it, it’s probably gonna end up coming to you for a better shot.”

Butler wished the statistician would’ve awarded him with his fourth assist on Wade’s big jumper but isn’t complaining too much.

“He’s done it his entire career, this is just another year for him. I’m just happy he’s doing it for the Chicago Bulls.”

And for the first time, Chicago can cheer its hometown son without conflict.

Jimmy Butler's injury produced memories for Zach LaVine, Fred Hoiberg

Jimmy Butler's injury produced memories for Zach LaVine, Fred Hoiberg

MINNEAPOLIS — That feeling of having your knee buckle out of nowhere, Zach LaVine is all-too familiar with it.

That feeling of being on the sidelines and watching Jimmy Butler’s knee give out, Fred Hoiberg has been there, too.

Different perspectives, and different reactions but Butler’s knee injury produced a sick feeling to many who watched it Friday night. Butler turned to pivot in the Timberwolves’ game against the Houston Rockets and immediately collapsed on the floor, having to be carried off.

LaVine tore his ACL in Detroit over a year ago, while it was revealed Butler suffered a right meniscus injury. But it looked all the same and LaVine understood the uncertainty Butler must’ve been feeling before the MRI revealed it wasn’t an ACL injury.

“It’s scary,” LaVine said following morning shootaround at the Target Center Saturday afternoon. “I wish him the best. You don’t want to see that happen to anybody. Especially a player of his caliber and what he’s done for the team.”

When LaVine injured his ACL, he actually played a few more minutes before being removed and going to the locker room. The time between being evaluated by doctors and them coming back feels like a lifetime.

“It’s scary. You know you hurt yourself, you don’t know how bad,” LaVine said. “You think you’re good, you’re a tough minded person trying to get through it.”

“I saw him on the ground trying to get up, (Rockets guard) Chris Paul made him sit down. Jimmy’s a tough dude. Thoughts and prayers going out to him.”

Butler and LaVine were the centerpieces of the draft day trade involving the Bulls and Timberwolves. With Butler suffering the injury the night before playing his former team a second time, the timing produced a bunch of memories.

In Hoiberg’s first year with the Bulls, Butler went down in a somewhat similar manner in Denver, a non-contact injury. It looked just as bad, and Butler was taken off the floor in a wheelchair.

Thankfully it was a right knee strain that cost him several weeks but it wasn’t as bad as it looked. Considering the minutes he’s played over the last few years, Hoiberg was asked if Butler pushes himself too hard to be on the floor.

“Jimmy he wants to be out there,” Hoiberg said. “I remember the first year in Denver, he went down with what looked to be a serious injury. Thankfully he was back on the floor after 15-16 games.”

Actually, Butler missed 11 consecutive games before coming back for a nationally-televised game against the Rockets, playing 34 minutes in a Bulls win and missing the next three games for recovery.

“We really worried when he went down but it wasn’t something that ended his season,” Hoiberg said. “Jimmy’s a worker. He’s one of the hardest working guys I’ve seen. It’s a huge reason for the type of player he is, that work ethic to make him one of the elite players in the league.”

With Bulls-Timberwolves looming, Jimmy Butler is diagnosed with meniscus injury

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USA TODAY

With Bulls-Timberwolves looming, Jimmy Butler is diagnosed with meniscus injury

Jimmy Butler won't be facing the Bulls a second time this season.

Butler suffered a non-contact knee injury on Friday night in Houston. The initial X-ray only revealed he didn't have any broken bones, but the MRI had to wait until Saturday.

The Timberwolves announced that the MRI revealed a meniscus injury in Butler's right knee. There is not yet word on how long the All-Star guard will be out of action, but if it wasn't already assumed that he wouldn't play against the Bulls, it's now certain.

Avoiding the ACL tear means avoiding the worse case scenario, but this is likely still going to cause Butler to miss a significant amount of time with about a quarter of the regular season remaining. An update from Shams Charania of The Vertical said Butler could return for the postseason.

The Bulls take on the Timberwolves on Saturday night. Butler dropped 38 points at the United Center in his return to Chicago exactly two weeks ago, but the Bulls won 114-113.

Butler posted on Instagram a reaction to the injury.

Saturday's game will be the returns of Zach LaVine and Kris Dunn to Minnesota after they went the other direction in the Butler trade on draft night last June.