Bulls

Sam: Thibodeau will lead Bulls in the right direction

189464.jpg

Sam: Thibodeau will lead Bulls in the right direction

Friday, June 11, 2010
8:32 PM
By Aggrey Sam
CSNChicago.com

With the NBA Finals currently knotted up at two games apiece after Thursday night's Boston home victory, continued praise has been heaped upon the defensive strategies of the Celtics and their associate head coach Tom Thibodeau, who also happens to be the recently-hired head coach of the Chicago Bulls. Although the hiring has not yet been made official--the decision was made last weekend, but won't be announced until after the conclusion of the Finals--the longtime NBA assistant ascension to head coach has been eagerly anticipated amongst his peers seemingly forever.

While any speculation about how Thibodeau, who reportedly has a three-year contract for 6.5 million, will fare as a first-time head coach in the league is premature, there is some insight as to how he would perform in a return to a role he hasn't had since he was a 26-year-old head coach at his alma mater, Salem State College in Massachusetts.

"There's nobody I can think of in the NBA that deserves this opportunity more than Thibodeau does," Paul Biancardi, a college basketball recruiting analyst for ESPN and Scouts, Inc. and high school basketball television analyst for ESPN told CSNChicago.com. "I don't think you ever question how long the process takes."

"He got the opportunity," continued Biancardi. "Some guys get it too quick, some guys it takes a little longer and it was his time to get it."

"He'll probably tell you he's more prepared for this than he was 10 years ago."

Biancardi was a senior, team captain and the sixth man for Thibodeau's Salem State squad during the 1984-85 season.

"I just knew from day one how much he loved the game of basketball, how dedicated he was and he always tried to make himself a better coach," said Biancardi, a longtime college basketball assistant coach at schools like Boston College and Ohio State, as well as the former head coach at Wright State. "He's one of the main reasons I got into the coaching profession of basketball, because I saw such a passion and a persistence in him and it excited me more about the game."

"I was already excited about the game when I played for him and as a captain of his team in '85, but he got me more involved and more passionate about the game. It became a profession for both of us," said Biancardi, who, at 22, was only a bit younger than his head coach, who moved on to be an assistant at Harvard University the next season before being hired as an assistant for the Minnesota Timberwolves in 1989, the first of his many jobs--he went on to be an advanced scout for Seattle, an assistant in San Antonio, a New York Knicks assistant for seven season under Jeff Van Gundy and a Van Gundy assistant in Houston before assuming his current role under Doc Rivers in Boston--around the league.

Biancardi has observed Thibodeau's career arc and believes his former coach will coach will be successful in Chicago.

"Obviously he's been noted and celebrated as an excellent defensive coach," said Biancardi. "He'll get them to play his defensive schemes and there's some talent there, so he'll get that talent to defend."

"He's coached under some great guys--Jeff Van Gundy, he's worked for Doc Rivers--so his offensive philosophy has grown over time," he continued. "I think he'll take the time to invest in and develop the young players. He knows how to invest his time into players, he's committed to making the young players better, he'll understand the veterans that he has and every player on that team will be prepared for their individual matchup and the in-game plan. There won't be a team that will be more prepared and I think that's the difference between him and some of the other coaches in the league."

"Also, his personality has grown over time. He's been an assistant for a long time, but he's been right next to that head coach so I think he'll deal with the players very, very effectively," Biancardi concluded.

Along with his former player's favorable opinion of him, Thibodeau is also well respected by his peers.

"I see Tom being a hands-on coach because he's been a lifelong assistant," Brian James, another longtime NBA assistant, told CSNChicago. "As an assistant coach at his various stops around the league, Thibodeau, always had a series of things his team needs to get done in training camp--different late-game situations, what to do if a team does this. If Tom follows the mold of everything he's been taught and his experience over the last five to 10 years, he's going to be fine."

"He's a protoge of Jeff Van Gundy," said James, who was an assistant under Doug Collins in Detroit and Washington and is expected to join Collins' new staff in Philadelphia, as well as stints in Toronto and Milwaukee, told CSNChicago.com. "He'll have a no-nonsense approach, he lives and dies basketball, that's his passion."

James praised Thibodeau's renowned work ethic ("he devotes 100 percent of his time to the game") and defensive philosophy, but believes Thibodeau's ability to develop players--something key on a young team like the Bulls--is often overlooked.

"I saw the work Tom did with Yao Ming down in Houston. He did a tremendous job with him. Yao had some of the best seasons of his career with Tom there," James, who worked as an advanced scout for Milwaukee this season. "I know tom will work endless hours on his development of players. That's one of Tom's strong suits anyway. He knows how to develop players and push them to their limits."

Still, James acknowledges Thibodeau will certainly have some growing pains in his new role.

"I think anybody under the glaring lights and intensity of Chicago will be analyzed and criticized," said James, who began his coaching career as a high school coach in Illinois, including Glenbrook North High School, where he coached former Duke player and current assistant coach Chris Collins. "It happened with Vinny Del Negro, Doug Collins, you name it, and I think the same goes for Tom."

With Thibodeau's fellow longtime NBA assistant Larry Drew appearing poised to move down one seat on Atlanta's bench as the Hawks' new head coach (in somewhat of a surprise, as most observers expected Dallas assistant Dwane Casey to get the job) and the Hornets' recently hiring of Monty Williams (after Thibodeau reportedly rejected their overtures), an assistant coach in Portland, Thibodeau's hire is not the one of upward mobility. However, New Jersey's hiring of Avery Johnson follows a more typical league trend of recycling previous head coaches, while Cleveland's courting of Michigan State's Tom Izzo (though they are also reportedly considering Johnson's ESPN colleague and former NBA head coach Byron Scott, to an extent) would be a less predictable move of elevating a college coach. That means the last remaining league head-coaching vacancy with no widely-reported front-runner is the Clippers job, and with reports that record executive David Geffen is exploring purchasing a controlling stake of the franchise
from longtime, notoriously tight-fisted owner Donald Sterling, there's at least one organization left where superstar LeBron James can truly pick his coach, as the Clippers have the cap room to sign a max free agent.

All jokes aside, while James' impending free agency has dominated headlines, reports out of Phoenix that Amar'e Stoudemire is leaning toward returning to the Suns means the destination of fellow free agent Chris Bosh could determine the balance of power in the NBA next season. Translation: if Stoudemire is back in Phoenix, he's no longer the first or second option at power forward for other teams, putting more of a premium on acquiring Bosh, who is widely regarded as the player Chicago and other teams with cap space will try to pair with James.

Getting back to Thibodeau, regardless of whether the Bulls end up with James, Bosh or any other top-tier free agent, fans who expect a championship overnight because of his pedigree may not get their wish immediately, but it appears that despite his lack of head coaching experience, the organization has a leader that fits the direction in which they want to be headed. And maybe--just maybe--with a little bit of patience, the Bulls will have the same type of parade the Blackhawks had today.

Bulls Talk Podcast: Do Bulls have a realistic chance of landing Paul George?

4-25_paul_george_usat.jpg
USA TODAY

Bulls Talk Podcast: Do Bulls have a realistic chance of landing Paul George?

On this edition of the Bulls Talk Podcast, Mark Schanowski, Kendall Gill, and Kevin Anderson discuss the chances of the Bulls signing Paul George in free agency this summer.

Plus, would Jimmy Butler really want to finish his career in Chicago? Also, a look around the NBA playoffs including the surprise performance of Derrick Rose, and you don’t want to miss the offer that Kendall makes Vincent Goodwill – it may be too tough for Vinnie to pass up.

Listen to the full Bulls Talk Podcast right here:

NBA Playoffs' youth movement makes clock on long rebuilds tick quicker than ever

NBA Playoffs' youth movement makes clock on long rebuilds tick quicker than ever

New blood has injected life into the opening week of the NBA Playoffs as youthful newcomers have found the bright lights just to their fitting.

For those on the outside looking in, half-decade rebuilding plans appear tougher to sell to fan bases and ownership groups watching players on rookie scale deals outperform their contracts.

Jayson Tatum and Jaylen Brown weren’t expected to lead the Boston Celtics this season, but they’ve been thrust into leading roles after Gordon Hayward’s season-ending injury on Opening Night and Kyrie Irving’s knee troubles shut him down weeks before the postseason.

But they’ve shown there’s no need to be treated with kid gloves, that redshirting is for the minor leagues. Tatum hasn’t gotten the extra publicity of Utah’s Donovan Mitchell and Philadelphia’s Ben Simmons, but he’s not to be forgotten about in the playoff equation.

Brown had the benefit of being a rookie for the Celtics last season, and was more bystander than active participant.

But he’s still 21 years old, months younger than Mitchell and Simmons.

The two frontrunners for Rookie of the Year are certainly franchise players, and although they have major help on their respective rosters by way of veterans or fellow phenoms, one could argue the Utah Jazz and Philadelphia 76ers would have made the playoffs regardless.

The playoffs used to be a place reserved for the veterans, a higher plane of air that young lungs weren’t yet prepared for.

But Simmons is posting numbers that have statisticians scrambling for box scores from the tape-delay era for reference, while Mitchell is showing the teams who passed him up they should check their scouting and decision making.

And even though we could be in store for more of the same in the Finals if LeBron James’ Cavs meet Stephen Curry’s Warriors in June, the road to get there will be filled with so many new faces sure to be more than potholes in the years to come.

Recent NBA history can’t be written without the San Antonio Spurs, Miami Heat and Oklahoma City Thunder having significant ink. But each is on the verge of going fishing, trailing 3-1 after four games.

Instead, the 76ers are now darlings, the Celtics are chugging along without main cogs and the Jazz aren’t far away from catching the attention of casual fans to become must-see TV.

There’s a shift going on in the NBA, with slow-moving franchises hoping for a traditional clock on a rebuild taking the risk of being passed by those more determined, more opportunistic and unbothered by job security in the pursuit of winning now.

If you have something close to a unicorn, your house better be in order. Of the rising stars who have a level of establishment in the league’s hierarchy, only Kristaps Porzingis’ New York Knicks and Devin Booker’s Phoenix Suns are sitting on the outside of the playoff party. Porzingis is recovering from an ACL injury suffered midseason, otherwise the Knicks would have likely been in contention for a playoff spot.

The Suns, well, they’re a mess.

And it’s no coincidence both franchises are on the hunt for new coaches.

The talent pool in the NBA is so vast, its players seemingly so prepared for the transition to the professional game that the clock on franchises to wait on its players ticks louder than it ever has.

Factoring in booming salaries with young players poised to cash in on restricted free agency, franchises need answers on its young players—and they need them in the form of impact, in the form of wins.

Short of the Philadelphia 76ers’ sham and scam of the league’s rules by tanking for half a decade, it’s tough to envision a team duplicating the strategy with lottery reform on the horizon.

If done right, turnarounds can happen quicker than saving yourself a seat at the draft lottery four or five years in a row.

A correct mix of scouting, coach selection and veteran influence can put teams back in the playoff hunt quicker than before—as opposed to having similarly talented players making big money without having proven much.

For some fan bases, it represents hope.

For some front offices, you wonder if a shudder of fear is seeping into their buildings, knowing their clock is ticking.