Cubs

10 Cubs storylines to watch in 2012

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10 Cubs storylines to watch in 2012

Happy New Year to all Cubs fans out there. 2012 is the first full year in the Theo Epstein era. It's a new beginning. No looking back now. You know, except when we have to look back to make sure history doesn't repeat itself and for past stats, etc.

So, on the first day of 2012, CubsTalk has a list of 10 things to watch for in this new year. Some may be over and done with before February even hits, while others still be focal points at this time in 2013. We'll count down, just like you all did last night before midnight hit.
10. Starlin Castro career progression

It doesn't take a rocket scientist to know Castro is already the team's most marketable player, so there's no doubt he'd be a focal point of the franchise in 2012. But at just 21 (he will turn 22 March 24), he is still so new and raw at this game. Will he develop more power this year? Will he cut down on his errors and utilize his athleticism effectively at shortstop? Will he turn in another .300 season and reach the 200-hit plateau again? How will he continue to handle the attenion he gets playing as the biggest name on one of the most popular franchises in all of sports?

9. Tom Ricketts

You can't have a calendar year without addressing the team's owner, especially when the chairman of the franchise lured the biggest front office name in the game to his town. Ricketts will be front and center all year -- as a fan, as a businessman (deals like purchasing the McDonald's and subsequent land across the street from Wrigley are great business moves) and as a chairman.

8. Alfonso Soriano's contract

If the Cubs are rebuilding, it's hard to see Soriano sticking around. He will turn 36 this week and is one of the most grossly overpaid players in the game because of his declining skills. Will the Cubs be able to deal him, even if they eat a huge portion of his contract? If he's not traded, will he play everyday or will young guys like Tony Campana and Dave Sappelt get playing time as part of the youth movementrebuild?

7. Young pitchers

How will Andrew Cashner fare coming off his shoulder injury? Will he be a starter or a reliever for most of 2012? Will Trey McNutt get back on track as the organization's top pitching prospect? Will guys like Rafael Dolis and Jeff Beliveau spend extended time in the big-league bullpen? Will guys like Jeff Samaradzija and James Russell build off their solid 2011 seasons?

6. Matt Garza trade talks

With the way things are shaking out, it appears one of two things will happen before this offseason is up -- either Garza is traded or the Cubs sign him to a long-term deal a la the John Danks contract. Neither has to happen (Garza is under contract through the 2013 season), but it appears this situation is coming to a head here in the first couple months of 2012.

5. Brett Jackson

As the organization's top prospect, many fans are clamoring for the Cubs to have Jackson crack the starting lineup from Day One of spring training. But if Jackson isn't ready, there's no point in pushing him. After all, it would take an awful lot to go right for the Cubs to contend in 2012, so they can take their time and be patient. But either way, one has to figure Jackson will make his MLB debut sometime in 2012. The only question is...when?

4. Carlos Zambrano

Given his outspoken nature and the entertainment factor, Zambrano will always demand attention as long as he is part of the Cubs' organization. The only question is...how much longer will he be with the franchise?

3. Rebuilding effort

The Cubs are rebuilding. No secret about that anymore. As such, every move made will be examined and analyzed and everybody will have an eye toward the future. The real question is, how far down the road will people be looking? Some seem to be impatient and want immediate results, but things don't work like that, especially considering the shape of this franchise when the new front office took over.
2. Ron Santo's Hall of Fame induction

I would love to move this higher up, but there is good reason, I promise. The HOF induction is long overdue for the most beloved Cub ever. Fans will join friends and family of both the Cubs organziation and the Santo family in late July to honor one of baseball's greatest personalities and most passionate players.

1. Theo Epstein

He's so popular, he is just known by one name. Like Madonna. Or Prince. (The singer, not the slugging first baseman everybody wants the Cubs to sign) Theo has celebrity status like no other front office member has ever had, including Billy Beane, who has a whole movie made off his "Moneyball" tactics. Whereas the Santo HOF induction is a fantastic moment and a truly happy occasion, it will only be the focal point of a couple weeks -- at most -- of 2012. Epstein will be in the news every single day of the new year. Every mistake he makes -- and he will make some, that's a guarantee -- he will be second-guessed like no other. Every success, no matter how small, will only add to his legacy.

2012 probably won't bring a World Series ring for Cubs fans, but it will still be a heck of exciting year. Stick right here at CubsTalk for all the latest on news and rumors each and every day.

Offseason of change begins with Cubs firing pitching coach Chris Bosio

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USA TODAY

Offseason of change begins with Cubs firing pitching coach Chris Bosio

"Of course," Cubs manager Joe Maddon said in the middle of the National League Championship — he would like his coaches back in 2018. Pitching coach Chris Bosio told the team's flagship radio station this week that the staff expected to return next year. President of baseball operations Theo Epstein didn't go that far during Friday afternoon's end-of-season news conference at Wrigley Field, but he did say: "Rest assured, Joe will have every coach back that he wants back."

That's Cub: USA Today columnist Bob Nightengale first reported Saturday morning that Bosio had been fired, a source confirming the team declined a club contract option for next year and made a major influence on the Wrigleyville rebuild a free agent. Epstein and Bosio did not immediately respond to text messages and the club has not officially outlined the shape of the 2018 coaching staff.

Those exit meetings on Friday at Wrigley Field are just the beginning of an offseason that could lead to sweeping changes, with the Cubs looking to replace 40 percent of their rotation, identify an established closer (whether or not that's Wade Davis), find another leadoff option and maybe break up their World Series core of hitters to acquire pitching. 

The obvious candidate to replace Bosio is Jim Hickey, Maddon's longtime pitching coach with the Tampa Bay Rays who has Chicago roots and recently parted ways with the small-market franchise that stayed competitive by consistently developing young arms like David Price and Chris Archer.

Of course, Maddon denied that speculation during an NLCS where the Los Angeles Dodgers dominated the Cubs in every phase of the game and the manager's bullpen decisions kept getting second-guessed.

Bosio has a big personality and strong opinions that rocked the boat at times, but he brought instant credibility as an accomplished big-league pitcher who helped implement the team's sophisticated game-planning system.

Originally a Dale Sveum hire for the 2012 season/Epstein regime Year 1 where the Cubs lost 101 games, Bosio helped coach up and market short-term assets like Ryan Dempster, Scott Feldman, Matt Garza and Jeff Samardzija. 

Those win-later trades combined with Bosio's expertise led to a 2016 major-league ERA leader (Kyle Hendricks) and a 2015 NL Cy Young Award winner (Jake Arrieta) plus setup guys Pedro Strop and Carl Edwards Jr. and All-Star shortstop Addison Russell.

Bosio helped set the foundation for the group that won last year's World Series and has made three consecutive trips to the NLCS. But as the Cubs are going to find out this winter, there is a shelf life to everything, even for those who made their mark during a golden age of baseball on the North Side.

Report: Cubs fire pitching coach Chris Bosio after six seasons with team

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USA TODAY

Report: Cubs fire pitching coach Chris Bosio after six seasons with team

In Theo Epstein's end of season press conference on Friday he said that any coach Joe Maddon wants back will return in 2018.

Evidently, there's one coach Maddon didn't want back.

According to USA Today's Bob Nightengale, the Cubs have fired longtime pitching coach Chris Bosio.

Bosio served as the Cubs pitching coach from 2012-17. He was the team's pitching coach under former managers' Dale Sveum (2012-13) and Rick Renteria (2014), and was retained when Maddon was hired as manager of the Cubs in 2015.

Bosio, who is one of the most respected pitching coaches in baseball, was instrumental in the career resurgence of Jake Arrieta who captured the Cy Young award in 2015, and the development of 27-year-old starter Kyle Hendricks (MLB's ERA leader in 2016).

One reason that could've led to Bosio's firing was the pitching staff's control issues during both the regular season and postseason, which Epstein mentioned during Friday's press conference. The Cubs issued the fifth-most walks (554) in the National League during the regular season and the highest total (53) during the postseason.

As the Cubs hit the market for a new pitching coach, Nightengale mentioned that one name that could be on the radar is former Tampa Rays pitching coach Jim Hickey, who parted ways with the organization following the 2017 season.

Hickey served as Maddon's pitching coach in Tampa Bay from 2006-2014.