Cubs

After Sveum, is Maddux in play for Cubs?

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After Sveum, is Maddux in play for Cubs?

Dale Sveum didnt know Mike Maddux had withdrawn from the Red Sox managerial search until a reporter mentioned it to him on Monday night at Wrigley Field. They coached together in Milwaukee and remain good friends. They could be competing for the same job.

There are several subplots here, and Sveum and Maddux are at the center. Theo Epstein started researching candidates while he was working for the Red Sox. The Cubs are screening potential managers the same way they are in Boston.

Sveum who already interviewed at Fenway Park went through it again on Monday at Clark and Addison. Family considerations compelled Maddux to tell the Red Sox no thanks. The Rangers pitching coach is still scheduled to interview on Wednesday with the Cubs.

My wife and two daughters are together in the same state for the first time in three years and words cannot describe my happiness, Maddux said in a statement released to Texas reporters. The game of baseball has many sacrifices, but being apart from family is the toughest. I feel there is too much distance between the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex and Boston to see my family as much as Id enjoy.

What about Chicago? Sveum praised Maddux as perhaps the hardest-working coach in baseball, someone who will make a good manager someday, if not this year.

But Sveum, who will turn 48 this month, can make his own compelling case to be the next Cubs manager. Near the end of his 12-year career in the big leagues, he played for Tony La Russa, Lou Piniella, Jim Leyland and Joe Torre.

The Brewers hitting coach has been given many responsibilities during his six seasons on the Milwaukee staff, including 12 games as interim manager after Ned Yost was fired. That run helped clinch the 2008 wild card and convinced Sveum that he could do the job.

Sveum emphasizes video work and is comfortable with quantitative analysis. He also has the Boston connection with Epsteins inner circle. He was the third-base coach on the 2004 Red Sox team that reversed the curse. He knows what life is like in the big city.

When youre dealing with the Cubs and any major market, Sveum said, youre expected to win that year. Youre not expected to be rebuilding or doing anything other than thinking about winning the World Series.

The Cubs have a long-range plan that makes it seem unrealistic to sign Prince Fielder to a megadeal this winter. But Sveum would vouch for the first baseman, and his influence on a clubhouse.

You wish you had 25 Prince Fielders playing as hard as he does every night, Sveum said. The leadership that he brings by the way he plays is unmatched by anybody in baseball. (I) dont think I see anybody, day in and day out, play every single game as hard as Prince Fielder.

In keeping with Epsteins vision of bringing in the best and the brightest, the Cubs also announced the hiring of Joe Bohringer as pro scouting director. The 41-year-old DeKalb resident graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has more than two decades of experience in professional baseball.

Throughout the organization, there will be new sets of eyes taking hard looks at the way the Cubs do business, trying to figure out why theyve gone so long without winning it all.

The million-dollar question, Sveum said. Being a baseball player and a coach for all these years, you always bring the Cubs up and why (they havent won). Its almost like a fluke that somebody with this kind of firepower hasnt won the World Series before.

A lot of times there is no formula. Sometimes it takes a lot of luck, a ball bouncing this way (to) win the World Series. You saw what happened to the Rangers this year. One little flyball could have been two feet (the other way) and they win the World Series.

Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field

Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field

CLEVELAND — Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field.

Namely, the impact the Cubs left on the floor of the visiting locker room.

With 18 months in between visits, one of the first things the Cubs noticed about their clubhouse at Progressive Field was the new carpet.

"It's probably necessary," Joe Maddon said with a smile. "So some good things have come from all that stuff, too, for the visitors. You get new interior decorating."

After the Indians blew a 3-1 lead in the 2016 World Series, the Cubs — and Bill Murray — dumped an awful lot of champagne and Budwesier on the old carpets.

Like, A LOT. 

"Oh yeah," Addison Russell said, "I think we messed it up pretty good."

It'd be hard to fault the Cubs for an epic celebration to honor the end of a 108-year championship drought, especially the way in which they accomplished the feat with maybe the most incredible baseball game ever played.

As the Cubs returned to the emotional, nostalgic-riddled scene of that historic fall, the parallels were striking.

Exactly 18 months before Tuesday, the Cubs walked into Progressive Field for the start of the World Series in 54 degree Cleveland weather with overcast skies and a pestering little drizzle.

Tuesday, the Cubs walked back into Progressive Field in 54 degree Cleveland weather with overcast skies and a pestering little drizzle.

A bunch of Cubs also found their lockers in the same place in that visiting locker room.

Russell, Ben Zobrist, Kyle Schwarber, Jason Heyward, Anthony Rizzo and Jon Lester all have their lockers in the same spots this week as they had for the 2016 Fall Classic.

Some clubhouses go in numerical order, some go based on position groups. The Indians don't really seem to fall under either camp, considering Lester was surrounded by all position players in the corner of the locker room, where — before Tuesday —was last seen giving a heartfelt "thank you" to the media for "putting up with him" all season.

"Just walking back into the stadium from the bus into the clubhouse, you get the sense of nostalgia," Russell said. "I see that they replaced the carpet, which is nice. But yeah, the weight room, the food room, I just remember walking around here having that World Series Champs shirt on.

"It's a great memory. I think this is the same locker I had as well. Everything's just fitting like a puzzle piece right now and it's pretty awesome."

Kyle Schwarber is basically Superman in Cleveland

Kyle Schwarber is basically Superman in Cleveland

CLEVELAND — Kyle Schwarber LOVES hitting in Cleveland.

It's like he morphs into a superhero just by stepping foot into the left-handed batter's box at Progressive Field.

Playing in Cleveland for the first time since his legendary return to the field in the 2016 World Series, Schwarber went absolutely bonkers on a Josh Tomlin pitch in the second inning Tuesday night:

That wasn't just any homer, however. 

The 117.1 mph dinger was the hardest-hit ball by any Cubs hitter in the era of exit velocity, aka since Statcast was invented in 2015:

Schwarber followed that up with another solo blast into the right-field bleachers in the fourth inning off Tomlin.

Schwarber — an Ohio native — collected his first MLB hit at Progressive Field back on June 17, 2015 in his second career game. He went 6-for-9 in that series with a triple, homer and 4 RBI.

Couple that with his World Series totals and the first two times up Tuesday and Schwarber has hit .500 with a .545 on-base percentage and .900 slugging percentage in his first 33 trips to the plate in Cleveland.