Cubs

Angel Guzman doesnt live with regrets

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Angel Guzman doesnt live with regrets

Tuesday, March 1, 2011
6:30 PM
By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. As good as Carlos Zambrano, the Cubs say when they look back on what Angel Guzman used to be.

That seems like a lifetime ago, but coming up through the system, the Cubs were high on two pitchers from Venezuela. One now has a guaranteed 91.5 million contract, while the other is working on a minor-league deal.

At the age of 29, Guzman does not view that as unfair, or wonder about what might have been. Eleven months after arthroscopic surgery on his right shoulder, he is focused on throwing batting practice on Wednesday, for the first time all over again.

I never paid attention to that at all when I was younger, Guzman said. I wouldnt change anything. I would do it the same way (as Im) doing it right now. Just keep it simple (be) a humble guy and just live in the reality.

Guzman was a pitcher the Cubs could dream about. Perceptions started changing in 2003, when Dr. James Andrews operated on Guzmans shoulder to repair a small tear in the back of his labrum. That was right around the time he should have been playing in the All-Star Futures Game.

My first look at him was like: Oh my God, said Cubs manager Mike Quade, who watched Guzman in camp and had him at Triple-A Iowa. And there were a lot of moments in his career in between the injury issues where thats what you saw. He was an exciting young prospect, for sure: Stuff, stature, a tall (kid with) good life (on his pitches). There were a lot of things to like.

Andrews, one of the most famous names in sports medicine, would also perform Guzmans Tommy John surgery in 2007, as well as the procedure last March. By then, everything was closing in on Guzman. He was already recovering from knee surgery, and dealing with the loss of his brother, who was murdered last year in Venezuela.

Its one of the cruelties of the game, Quade said. Hes a guy you root for, a long shot, (but) Ive played a few of those and cashed.

All this has given Guzman remarkable perspective. He spent all last season in Arizona, fighting the loneliness by working out in the brutal desert heat. Hes feeling better, but through experience knows that this will be a slow process.

Guzmans shown that he can do the job he posted a 2.95 ERA in 55 games out of the Cubs bullpen in 2009 but the Cubs cant count on him because of those medical records. His goal is to leave Mesa by May if everything goes the right way and head to a minor-league affiliate.

They want me to come back and every single guy in this clubhouse is showing me support, Guzman said. Its something that you really have to appreciate. (The Cubs) have been waiting for me for so long. Its something that really motivates you to become a better person, a better player, a better teammate.

Guzman became a free agent this offseason, and could have signed elsewhere, but returned to the organization hes been a part of since the Clinton administration.

The Cubs will keep giving him chances until he finally breaks down and really cant pitch anymore. And then theyll want to hire him to work in their player-development department. Because hed be a strong voice to talk straight with the Latin kids and the pitchers who think they already have it all figured out.

For Guzman, this gets tiresome, because with each injury its the same answers to the same questions. And against the odds, he tries to maintain the same positive outlook.

If youre really into the sport, it gets you, Guzman said, but (it makes you) stronger.

PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Is this catch by Reed Johnson the best of the last decade?

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NBC Sports Chicago

Is this catch by Reed Johnson the best of the last decade?

Ten years ago today, Reed Johnson had one of the best catches in a Cubs uniform.

On April 26, 2008, the Cubs outfielder made a spectacular diving catch off of Nationals' Felipe Lopez's liner to center field. Johnson had to run to his right in what felt like a mile to track down. He then dove for it on the warning track going head first into the wall. Remember this?

How he caught it? Not sure. And how he didn't get hurt? Don't know that either.

But a lot of members on the Cubs at the time raved about the catch (Len Kasper's call was also phenomenal), and joked that they're happy it didn't happen on W. Addison St.

"At Wrigley Field they might have had to call a timeout to find his head in the vines," manager Lou Piniella said after that game.

There have been some outstanding catches since that catch in 2008. Jason Heyward's diving grab in San Francisco, Javier Baez's catch against the Miami Marlins where he dove into the crowd, Anthony Rizzo's tarp catches. There are a handful of them. 

But where does this one rank?

How often do the Cubs think about Game 7?

How often do the Cubs think about Game 7?

CLEVELAND — Diehard Cubs fans probably think about that epic Game 7 every day, right?

It was — arguably — the greatest baseball game ever played given the stakes (a winner-take-all to end one of the two biggest championship droughts in the sport) and all the wild moments.

The highlights still have the power to give Cubs fans chills 18 months later:

But how often do the guys who took part in that game think about those moments?

This week, as the Cubs split a series with the Cleveland Indians and walked the same steps and sat in the same seats and put their stuff in the same lockers as they did almost exactly a year-and-a-half ago, the nostalgia was undeniable.

The first thing Addison Russell noticed was how he was at the same locker (many Cubs were) as the World Series and the visiting locker room carpet was redone.

He also admitted it felt surreal, almost like a dream.

Kyle Schwarber made that Hollywood-style comeback to be able to DH for the four World Series games at Progressive Field, but he doesn't think about his journey back from a devastating knee injury.

No, he preferred to focus on the Cubs' comeback from down 3-1 in the series.

"I like to think about the World Series," Schwarber said. "I really don't think about all that other stuff. I just think about the games that we played. Pretty much all the resiliency and everything right there that we had and how we faced adversity.

"I don't think anyone here doesn't think about it, because I always think about it all the time. It's that moment that we all live for and it's an addicting feeling and we want to get there again, so we just gotta take it a step at a time."

On the other side of the coin, Cubs manager Joe Maddon insists he doesn't spend time looking in the past.

"Not unless I'm asked about it," Maddon said. "I think I'm really good about turning pages and not even realizing it. I often talk about present tense and I think I'm pretty good about it. Unless it's brought up, I don't go there."

Admittedly, a lot has changed for these Cubs since then.

With World Series MVP Ben Zobrist currently on the disabled list, only 13 of the 25 active Cubs were also active in Game 7.

And given this 11-10 team has "World Series or bust" expectations on the 2018 campaign, there's work to be done and not much time to focus on the past.

Take David Bote — a 2012 Cubs draft pick who was just called up to make his MLB debut last weekend — who watched the road to end a 108-year title drought from afar, but is now in the midst of a bid at a new iteration of Even Year Magic.

"The organization does a great job of being all together and we're in one spot [in spring training], so you get to see and experience it with them," Bote said. "Here, what we're talking about is today and how we can win today. We don't really talk about what happened in the past in '16."