Cubs

The catch to Castro's Rookie of the Year push

The catch to Castro's Rookie of the Year push

Saturday, Sept. 18, 2010
8:11 PM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

MIAMI This isnt the Heisman Trophy race, where one highlight-reel moment can change voters minds and win a player the award. But Starlin Castros run from shortstop, full-extension leap across the left-field grass and basket catch diving into foul territory felt like something the Cubs would want to put on a billboard.

Castro is still more than six months away from being able to legally enjoy the Presidente beer his teammates were sipping late Friday night inside the clubhouse at Sun Life Stadium.

The mood might have been different if he hadnt tracked down that ball to end the game. Instead of lining up for high fives after a 2-0 victory, Carlos Marmol would have had to deal with the two Florida Marlins he walked in what would have been a one-run game.

That saved the game not me, Marmol said with a laugh. Hes good. Hes going to be (better) as soon as he finds (more) confidence at shortstop.

At 20, Marmol was pitching in rookie-league ball, trying to figure things out as a converted catcher, with no realistic expectation that he would become a dominant closer. Thats what the Cubs are trying to remind everyone. This will be a process.

Castros defensive instincts were apparent in the ninth inning, but so were his flaws in the seventh and eighth, when he booted a ball into the outfield and bobbled another on a double-play turn.

Sometimes you get scared, you dont want the ball hit to you, Castro said through interpreterthird-base coach Ivan DeJesus. The only way I can figure it out is to concentrate on the next hitter and try to make a play after that.

Castro didnt get in front of a ball hit to his left on Saturday night and committed his 27th error. There will be spectacular catches as well as the lapses in concentration that recently led manager Mike Quade to bench him for two games.

We talk so much about making the plays from six-to-eight feet, left-to-right, making the grinding, routine plays every day, Quade said. If he combines that (with his athleticism), then hes going to be a phenomenal player.

Quade managed Miguel Tejada, a future American League MVP, on his way up through the Oakland system. The As shortstop had 26 errors in 104 games during his first extended stay in the majors, which came at the age of 24.

Derek Jeter, then 22, finished with 22 errors in 157 games during his Rookie of the Year season in 1996. Ten years later, Hanley Ramirez, who was 22 at the time, committed 26 errors in 154 games and won the award.

On Saturday night Castro played in his 112th game since being promoted from Double-A Tennessee on May 7. He entered Saturday hitting .309 three plate appearances shy of qualifying for the National League leader board and .344 since the All-Star break.

When the ballots are due, voters will have to weigh that against Castros defensive issues, which will be hard to ignore, as well as a strong crop of rookies.

Atlantas Jason Heyward (.2881871) and San Franciscos Buster Posey (.3221461) are performing in pennant races. Floridas Gaby Sanchez (.2791878) is another reliable run-producer. St. Louis has been thinking about shutting down left-hander Jaime Garcia (13-8, 2.70), but his numbers deserve consideration.

Castro, who for perspective began last season at Class-A Daytona, says he isnt thinking about the Rookie of the Year award. No matter the results, hell be forced to grow up quick. This patience wont last forever.

Hes 20 years old, but he acts like a man, Alfonso Soriano said. He knows what he wants to do.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Predicting Cubs-Dodgers NLCS Game 5: 'Why not us?'

Predicting Cubs-Dodgers NLCS Game 5: 'Why not us?'

"NOT IN OUR HOUSE!" a Cubs coach yelled as he walked through the media throng awaiting entry into the clubhouse.

There was Kyle Schwarber standing at his locker, emphatically saying, "we're not gonna go down quietly."

There was Jake Arrieta, already making plans for what he would do to celebrate after the Cubs beat the Dodgers in the NLCS.

What a difference a day makes.

The Cubs looked completely beat and worn down after Game 3 Tuesday night. Kris Bryant echoed the same line — "why not us?" — he delivered last fall when the Cubs were down three games to one in the World Series, but this time, it just didn't feel the same.

Bryant looked shellshocked and admitted the team was drained after the NLDS and traveling across country to get steamrolled by the Dodgers in the first two games of the NLCS.

Wednesday night, things were different.

Even though the offense still hasn't broken out. 

Even though all the Cubs' runs still came off early homers — they have yet to score in this series not off a longball.

Even though Wade Davis is unavailable for Game 5 Thursday — the Cubs haven't won a game this postseason in which Davis did not pitch.

Even though the best pitcher on the planet — Clayton Kershaw — awaited the Cubs Thursday night at Wrigley Field.

The belief was back in the home clubhouse at Wrigley, even if it was just for one day.

But was it just for one day? 

I've been saying it all fall — the only time this Cubs team has played up to their potential is when they've had their backs against the wall. Your back couldn't possibly get more against the wall when down 0-3 in the NLCS, a deficit only one team in baseball history has come back from.

Conceivably, yes, the Cubs can pull this off. They can climb all the way out of this hole and make a second straight World Series.

If any team can do it, it's the group that erased the longest championship drought in American sports history and did it in the most dramatic way imaginable.

Will the Cubs be able to pull it off? 

I have no idea, honestly. I know that's a cop-out, but screw predictions at this point of the postseason. 

There's a very real possibility the Cubs offense finally breaks out and takes one more step toward writing this team's entry into the baseball history books.

There's also a very real possibility Kershaw comes out and slams the door on any talk of Cubs magic and finally pitches his way into the World Series for the first time.

Either way, the build-up to Thurday night around Wrigleyville is gonna be fun as hell.

Here's how the Cubs will line up as they try to take down Kershaw:

1. Albert Almora Jr. - CF
2. Kyle Schwarber - LF
3. Kris Bryant - 3B
4. Anthony Rizzo - 1B
5. Willson Contreras - C
6. Addison Russell - SS
7. Javy Baez - 2B
8. Ben Zobrist - RF
9. Jose Quintana - P

It's interesting to see Zobrist so low in the lineup. He's never hit eighth in a Cubs uniform and his last start in that spot in the order came in 2010 with Joe Maddon on the Tampa Bay Rays.

A huge reason for Zobrist's spot so low in Thursday's game is because he hit just .179 with a .553 OPS against left-handed pitchers in 2017 as he dealt through a wrist injury and other ailments that made hitting right-handed difficult.

In another huge playoff moment, Wade Davis stays cool while everything else around Cubs goes crazy

10-18_wade_davis_usat.jpg
USA TODAY

In another huge playoff moment, Wade Davis stays cool while everything else around Cubs goes crazy

This became a three-ring circus on Wednesday night at Wrigley Field, Cubs manager Joe Maddon screaming at the umpires, the video board showing the replay of Curtis Granderson’s swing and the crowd of 42,195 booing and chanting “BULLS#$!!”

The Los Angeles Dodgers are still in command of this National League Championship Series, but the Cubs won’t go quietly into the offseason, unleashing All-Star closer Wade Davis for the final two innings of a 3-2 thriller that kept them alive for at least another night.

The Cubs can worry about the daunting task of winning three more elimination games in the morning. Once Davis forced Cody Bellinger into the double-play groundball that left Justin Turner stranded in the on-deck circle and this one ended at 11:16 p.m., he pulled at his right sleeve and buttoned the top of his jersey while waiting for the Cubs to start the high-five line. “Go Cubs Go” blasted from the stadium’s sound  system and fireworks erupted beyond the center-field scoreboard and Davis acted as if nothing had happened.

To put the idea of beating the Dodgers three times in a row in perspective, the Cubs blasted three homers and got a classic big-game performance out of Jake Arrieta and still needed Davis for a heart-stopping, high-wire act.

Maddon already ruled out Davis for Thursday night’s Game 5 after the closer fired 48 pitches – or four more than he did during last week’s seven-out save that eliminated the Washington Nationals. But at least the Cubs will have those decisions to make instead of cleaning out their lockers.

“I don’t know,” Davis said. “We’ll definitely come in tomorrow and get some treatment and go out and play catch and see how I feel.”

It looks like Davis doesn’t feel anything on the mound. Davis didn’t react to Turner chucking his bat and yelling into the visiting dugout after crushing a 94-mph fastball for a home run to begin the eighth inning. Davis didn’t seem bothered by Yasiel Puig flipping his bat after drawing a walk. And Davis never lost his composure while Maddon got ejected for the second time in four NLCS games.

Maddon flipped out at home plate umpire Jim Wolf – and really the entire crew – when what was initially called a swinging strike three on Granderson got overturned and ruled a foul tip.

“Wade doesn’t care about any of that,” first baseman Anthony Rizzo said. “That’s the right guy to have on the mound. With the mentality he has, he’s going to strike the guy out on the next pitch. Obviously with the replay, it’s not easy to keep your composure. But he’s just different. He’s a different animal.”

While the fans at Wrigley Field got loud and turned angry, Davis chatted with catcher Willson Contreras: “I was just trying to think of the next pitch I was going to throw if he ended up staying in the box.”

Davis got Granderson (0-for-4, four strikeouts) swinging at strike four, walked Yasmani Grandal and then blew away Chase Utley with a 95.1-mph fastball, needing 34 pitches to finish the eighth inning. Davis wasn’t finished, using a Kris Bryant bat to hit against Dodger lefty Tony Cingrani, fouling off five pitches before striking out looking at a 94.9-mph fastball.

“Yeah, I gave up there after a little bit,” Davis said with a look that sort of resembled a smile. “He was bringing it pretty good, and I hadn’t seen a baseball in a while coming in like that.”

If the Cubs are going to match the 2004 Boston Red Sox – the only other team to come back from an 0-3 deficit since the LCS format expanded to seven games in 1985 – they are going to need the offense to generate more runs, a great start from Jose Quintana on Thursday night and someone else to run out of the bullpen. Not that Davis is ruling himself out for Game 5.

“Go get some sleep and then come in tomorrow and start getting ready,” Davis said.