Cubs

Cubs escape rain, start four-game set in Arizona

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Cubs escape rain, start four-game set in Arizona

Thursday, April 28, 2011Posted: 10:25 a.m.

Associated Press

The Chicago Cubs are glad to be headed to some warm weather, but their next opponent could be difficult for Ryan Dempster.

The struggling Dempster has a poor history as a starter against the Arizona Diamondbacks heading into Thursday night's opener of a four-game series at Chase Field.

Chicago (10-13) just completed a homestand that was scheduled for 10 games. Only eight were played after two weather-related postponements, including Wednesday's finale of a three-game set against Colorado. The Cubs, losers of three straight, did not have one game rained out last season.

"We know the conditions are going to be better, you know what to expect in Arizona," manager Mike Quade said. "It can wear on you when you get 10 days of this kind of weather. We'd love to have the conditions we're going get (in Arizona) right here at home. Warm weather will not be frowned upon."

Quade opted to push Casey Coleman's start to Sunday to keep the rest of his rotation in line. That means Dempster (1-2, 7.63 ERA) will try to put aside both his recent woes and his problems against the Diamondbacks (10-13) on Thursday.

The right-hander allowed seven runs and nine hits over 5 2-3 innings Saturday and did not get a decision in a 10-8 victory over the Los Angeles Dodgers. He surrendered three homers to bring his season total to eight in 30 2-3 innings.

"He's just not executing his pitches," Quade told the Cubs' official website.

Dempster is 2-7 with a 6.24 ERA in 14 career starts against Arizona. He yielded five runs over seven innings in a 6-4 loss April 6 at Wrigley Field - the Cubs' only loss in their last nine meetings with the Diamondbacks.

Diamondbacks outfielder Gerardo Parra is 5 for 8 against Dempster, and shortstop Stephen Drew is 4 for 8. Justin Upton has not joined in that success, going 2 for 15 off Dempster.

Arizona center fielder Chris Young hit two homers and drove in three runs in Wednesday's 8-4 home loss to Philadelphia. He's got six homers and 15 RBIs in 12 home games.

The Diamondbacks missed a chance to sweep the Phillies after Ian Kennedy and Daniel Hudson turned in strong starts in the first two games of the series. Joe Saunders allowed six runs over 5 2-3 innings Wednesday.

"You are not going to pitch good in every game," manager Kirk Gibson said. "Give them some credit. They put some good swings on us and hit good pitches as well."

For the opener of this series, Gibson will give the ball to Barry Enright (0-2, 6.65), who is 0-7 with a 7.40 ERA in his last nine starts. He gave up season highs of five runs and 12 hits over 5 2-3 innings Saturday in a 6-4 road loss to the New York Mets.

Enright is 0-1 with a 5.40 ERA in two starts against the Cubs. The right-hander did not receive a decision in a 6-5 loss at Wrigley on April 5, when he yielded four runs over six innings.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field

Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field

CLEVELAND — Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field.

Namely, the impact the Cubs left on the floor of the visiting locker room.

With 18 months in between visits, one of the first things the Cubs noticed about their clubhouse at Progressive Field was the new carpet.

"It's probably necessary," Joe Maddon said with a smile. "So some good things have come from all that stuff, too, for the visitors. You get new interior decorating."

After the Indians blew a 3-1 lead in the 2016 World Series, the Cubs — and Bill Murray — dumped an awful lot of champagne and Budwesier on the old carpets.

Like, A LOT. 

"Oh yeah," Addison Russell said, "I think we messed it up pretty good."

It'd be hard to fault the Cubs for an epic celebration to honor the end of a 108-year championship drought, especially the way in which they accomplished the feat with maybe the most incredible baseball game ever played.

As the Cubs returned to the emotional, nostalgic-riddled scene of that historic fall, the parallels were striking.

Exactly 18 months before Tuesday, the Cubs walked into Progressive Field for the start of the World Series in 54 degree Cleveland weather with overcast skies and a pestering little drizzle.

Tuesday, the Cubs walked back into Progressive Field in 54 degree Cleveland weather with overcast skies and a pestering little drizzle.

A bunch of Cubs also found their lockers in the same place in that visiting locker room.

Russell, Ben Zobrist, Kyle Schwarber, Jason Heyward, Anthony Rizzo and Jon Lester all have their lockers in the same spots this week as they had for the 2016 Fall Classic.

Some clubhouses go in numerical order, some go based on position groups. The Indians don't really seem to fall under either camp, considering Lester was surrounded by all position players in the corner of the locker room, where — before Tuesday —was last seen giving a heartfelt "thank you" to the media for "putting up with him" all season.

"Just walking back into the stadium from the bus into the clubhouse, you get the sense of nostalgia," Russell said. "I see that they replaced the carpet, which is nice. But yeah, the weight room, the food room, I just remember walking around here having that World Series Champs shirt on.

"It's a great memory. I think this is the same locker I had as well. Everything's just fitting like a puzzle piece right now and it's pretty awesome."

Kyle Schwarber is basically Superman in Cleveland

Kyle Schwarber is basically Superman in Cleveland

CLEVELAND — Kyle Schwarber LOVES hitting in Cleveland.

It's like he morphs into a superhero just by stepping foot into the left-handed batter's box at Progressive Field.

Playing in Cleveland for the first time since his legendary return to the field in the 2016 World Series, Schwarber went absolutely bonkers on a Josh Tomlin pitch in the second inning Tuesday night:

That wasn't just any homer, however. 

The 117.1 mph dinger was the hardest-hit ball by any Cubs hitter in the era of exit velocity, aka since Statcast was invented in 2015:

Schwarber followed that up with another solo blast into the right-field bleachers in the fourth inning off Tomlin.

Schwarber — an Ohio native — collected his first MLB hit at Progressive Field back on June 17, 2015 in his second career game. He went 6-for-9 in that series with a triple, homer and 4 RBI.

Couple that with his World Series totals and the first two times up Tuesday and Schwarber has hit .500 with a .545 on-base percentage and .900 slugging percentage in his first 33 trips to the plate in Cleveland.