Cubs

Cubs make first move with DeJesus deal

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Cubs make first move with DeJesus deal

Updated 6:00 p.m.

This isnt a megadeal. But its exactly the kind of incremental, sensible move Theo Epstein seemed to signal when he took over this rebuilding franchise.

The Cubs signed outfielder David DeJesus on Wednesday to a two-year deal with a club option for 2014 while everyone tries to figure out whether they will really go hard after Albert Pujols or Prince Fielder.

Were a major-market team and were going to be involved across the spectrum, general manager Jed Hoyer said. Responding to whether were on or off a certain player, it doesnt really serve our best interests.

This isnt buying at the absolute top of the bubble. DeJesus, who turns 32 next month, will earn 4.25 million in each of the next two seasons, with a 1.5 million buyout built into a 6.5 million option, netting him 10 million guaranteed.

DeJesus has spent his entire major-league career in Kansas City and Oakland. The Cubs view him as an everyday right fielder, an upgrade in several areas the team has been lacking. Hes a left-handed bat, a patient hitter, an athletic defender and a smooth runner on the bases.

DeJesus has a home in Wheaton and will meet the Chicago media on Thursday at Wrigley Field. Epstein has joked about leading the league in press conferences, but this marks the first player signing for the new president of baseball operations.

There are many dominos left to fall. The Cubs dont expect Carlos Pena to accept their arbitration offer, though Hoyer wouldnt say whether the first baseman might fit into their plans as an alternative to Pujols or Fielder.

(Pena) continues to do the same things year after year, which is really impressive, Hoyer said. Hes a very good defender. He gets on base. He has great power. I think hes very confident and he should be that theres a multi-year deal waiting for him.

That could be somewhere else. Ultimately, pitching will become the focus this winter. Hoyer continues to speak with Pat Rooney, the agent for Kerry Wood, and all indications are the new Mr. Cub will return in 2012.

The Cubs are expecting a bounce-back year out of DeJesus, who hit .240 (or 44 points below his career average) with 10 homers and 46 RBI last season in Oakland. They see a .356 lifetime on-base percentage for someone whos struck out only 575 times in more than 4,300 plate appearances.

DeJesus generated 25 homers and 144 RBI combined for Kansas City in 2008 and 2009. He emerged as a sought-after player on the trade market before a thumb injury derailed his 2010 season.

This move turns up the pressure on Tyler Colvin, a first-round pick during the previous administration. Colvin managed to hit 20 homers in only 358 at-bats as a rookie in 2010, but looked lost last season and will have to earn a job in camp.

We signed DeJesus (to) round out our lineup, Hoyer said. Tyler given the year he had needs to bounce back and that comes in spring training. But to say hes out of our plans would be wrong.

Against this backdrop, the Cubs are still absorbing the ramifications of a new collective bargaining agreement.

Labor peace came at a cost to the Cubs, who now wont be able to spend without restraint in the draft and international market. That was supposed to be a centerpiece to their long-term plan, which at first glance didnt seem to have room for a megadeal this winter.

Major League Baseball and the union made these changes for the greater good, Hoyer said. Its our job to figure out how it impacts our strategy. It certainly will. I dont think were at the place right now to be able to say exactly what were going to do because were still meeting on this.

But it is (significant). The teams that adjust quickest theres an advantage (in that) and we need to be among those teams that move quickly.

Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field

Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field

CLEVELAND — Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field.

Namely, the impact the Cubs left on the floor of the visiting locker room.

With 18 months in between visits, one of the first things the Cubs noticed about their clubhouse at Progressive Field was the new carpet.

"It's probably necessary," Joe Maddon said with a smile. "So some good things have come from all that stuff, too, for the visitors. You get new interior decorating."

After the Indians blew a 3-1 lead in the 2016 World Series, the Cubs — and Bill Murray — dumped an awful lot of champagne and Budwesier on the old carpets.

Like, A LOT. 

"Oh yeah," Addison Russell said, "I think we messed it up pretty good."

It'd be hard to fault the Cubs for an epic celebration to honor the end of a 108-year championship drought, especially the way in which they accomplished the feat with maybe the most incredible baseball game ever played.

As the Cubs returned to the emotional, nostalgic-riddled scene of that historic fall, the parallels were striking.

Exactly 18 months before Tuesday, the Cubs walked into Progressive Field for the start of the World Series in 54 degree Cleveland weather with overcast skies and a pestering little drizzle.

Tuesday, the Cubs walked back into Progressive Field in 54 degree Cleveland weather with overcast skies and a pestering little drizzle.

A bunch of Cubs also found their lockers in the same place in that visiting locker room.

Russell, Ben Zobrist, Kyle Schwarber, Jason Heyward, Anthony Rizzo and Jon Lester all have their lockers in the same spots this week as they had for the 2016 Fall Classic.

Some clubhouses go in numerical order, some go based on position groups. The Indians don't really seem to fall under either camp, considering Lester was surrounded by all position players in the corner of the locker room, where — before Tuesday —was last seen giving a heartfelt "thank you" to the media for "putting up with him" all season.

"Just walking back into the stadium from the bus into the clubhouse, you get the sense of nostalgia," Russell said. "I see that they replaced the carpet, which is nice. But yeah, the weight room, the food room, I just remember walking around here having that World Series Champs shirt on.

"It's a great memory. I think this is the same locker I had as well. Everything's just fitting like a puzzle piece right now and it's pretty awesome."

Kyle Schwarber is basically Superman in Cleveland

Kyle Schwarber is basically Superman in Cleveland

CLEVELAND — Kyle Schwarber LOVES hitting in Cleveland.

It's like he morphs into a superhero just by stepping foot into the left-handed batter's box at Progressive Field.

Playing in Cleveland for the first time since his legendary return to the field in the 2016 World Series, Schwarber went absolutely bonkers on a Josh Tomlin pitch in the second inning Tuesday night:

That wasn't just any homer, however. 

The 117.1 mph dinger was the hardest-hit ball by any Cubs hitter in the era of exit velocity, aka since Statcast was invented in 2015:

Schwarber followed that up with another solo blast into the right-field bleachers in the fourth inning off Tomlin.

Schwarber — an Ohio native — collected his first MLB hit at Progressive Field back on June 17, 2015 in his second career game. He went 6-for-9 in that series with a triple, homer and 4 RBI.

Couple that with his World Series totals and the first two times up Tuesday and Schwarber has hit .500 with a .545 on-base percentage and .900 slugging percentage in his first 33 trips to the plate in Cleveland.