Cubs

Cubs: No long-term concerns about Baez

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Cubs: No long-term concerns about Baez

Javier Baez is missing out on the chance to develop further in the Arizona Fall League. But the Cubs dont have long-term concerns about a player they think will one day become part of their core.

How did Baez wind up with a non-displaced fracture on the tip of his right thumb? To borrow a medical term from Lou Piniella, it might be classified as a Cubbie occurrence.

Celebratory high-five or (something like that), general manager Jed Hoyer said Thursday. They dont know exactly when he did it, but it was some sort of odd, non-baseball-playing injury. It certainly wasnt anything negative. He didnt punch a wall or anything. But it sounds like he was celebrating and might have hit it wrong.

People whove watched Baez extensively say he plays with swagger, almost out of control at times. But the ninth overall pick in the 2011 draft has made great strides. At 19, he was the second-youngest prospect in the Arizona Fall League.

Baseball America ranked Baez as the No. 1 prospect in the Midwest League after he hit .333 with a .979 OPS and 20 stolen bases in 57 games with Class-A Peoria. Hes a shortstop for now at least, or until hes close enough to the big leagues to think about playing alongside Starlin Castro. A logical path would have him returning to Class-A Daytona for the beginning of next season before finishing at Double-A Tennessee.

Baez tried to play through the injury before leaving Saturdays game. He hit .211 with four homers and 16 RBI in 14 games with the Mesa Solar Sox. Hes expected to be 100 percent by spring training.

He had had some really good moments in the Fall League, Hoyer said. Being such a young player in the Fall League and having to make those adjustments was really good for him. Thats the unfortunate part. The injurys not going to hinder anything going forward.

Yadier Molina claps back at Willson Contreras

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USA TODAY

Yadier Molina claps back at Willson Contreras

The Cubs-Cardinals rivalry is heating up early, it appears.

Just a few days after Willson Contreras told Chicago Sun-Times' Steve Greenberg that he believes he's going to be better than Yadier Molina and Buster Posey, Molina clapped back with an Instagram post:

That translates to "respect the ranks" showing Molina standing side-by-side with Posey.

At Cubs Convention over the weekend, Contreras said:


"I used to watch a lot of those guys but now I'm watching myself because I know that I'm going to be better than them. That's my plan. That's my mindset. 

“I know that I have a lot of talent and I thank God every day for giving me this kind of talent that I have. In my mind, I want to be the best catcher in the game for a long time — like it was with Yadier Molina, like it is with Buster Posey.”


MLB stoked the flames of this fire by Tweeting out a quote graphic Wednesday morning:

Neither Molina nor Contreras are strangers to keeping it real and saying how they truly feel, so this could get fun.

To be fair, though, it's not like Contreras said anything bad. He's a confident kid who believes he will eventually be the best catcher in the game (though the argument could easily be made that he's already close).

No issue in that. 

Molina has a point, too, that Contreras has only spent the last year-and-a-half in the majors, so maybe not the best time to be making such proclamations, but whatever.

Brian Duensing's return to Cubs is big, but where does he fit in new-look bullpen?

Brian Duensing's return to Cubs is big, but where does he fit in new-look bullpen?

Brian Duensing isn't the marquee pitcher Cubs fans were hoping their team would sign on the morning of Jan. 17, but he is one of the heroes they need.

Duensing is back in the Cubs' bullpen for the next two years at a discount of $7 million. It's a raise for him — he made $2 million in 2017 — but he left a lot of money on the table, joining players like Ben Zobrist who signed for less.

The veteran lefty was somebody the Cubs' "Geek Squad" and scouting department targeted last winter and made a priority to sign a year ago.

That worked out awfully well, as the 34-year-old Duensing put up the best season of his life with a 2.74 ERA, 1.22 WHIP and struck out a career-high 8.8 batters per nine innings.

Even Duensing himself was surprised by the strikeout totals:

"A lot of swings and misses — I don't know what that's about, to be honest," Duensing said back in August when he joined the Cubs Talk Podcast. "I really don't know what's going on there. Just things are working really well right now and hopefully they continue."

Duensing's success didn't quite continue on a linear path from there, as he followed up a stellar August (1.93 ERA) with a 4.82 ERA and 1.82 WHIP in September while striking out only six batters in 9.1 innings.

That poor last month was part of the reason why Duensing fell out of Joe Maddon's circle of trust entering the postseason, and while the veteran southpaw put up a 1.69 ERA and allowed just five baserunners in 5.1 innings, he didn't pitch often in high-leverage situations in October.

As for where Duensing fits in the Cubs bullpen in 2018 and 2019, he provides another reliable arm and helps work toward the front office's goal of getting more strike-throwers in a bullpen that struggled in that department in 2017.

Duensing walked just 18 batters in 62.1 innings and was not a part of the overall problem that saw the Cubs' bullpen post one of the worst BB/9 rates in Major League Baseball.

Of Duensing's 68 appearances in 2017, 15 of them went for more than three outs. While he wasn't a true long-relief option like Mike Montgomery, the former Minnesota Twin does have a background as a starter and can help eat up innings if a Cubs starter is knocked out early or the other bullpen arms need a rest.

He also provides another left-handed option for the 'pen with Justin Wilson a major question mark after his struggles in Chicago and Montgomery currently slotted in as a starter and expected to serve in a swingman capacity for parts of 2018. Reliable left-handed relievers are in short supply in the majors, and the Cubs are investing as much capital as they can in their bullpen.

Duensing probably isn't a guy that would fill in at closer at all if Brandon Morrow is injured or ineffective — Duensing has just two career saves — but he's another glue guy to a bullpen that looks like this:

Brandon Morrow
Carl Edwards Jr.
Pedro Strop
Justin Wilson
Steve Cishek
Justin Grimm
Brian Duensing

Another arm — whether that's Montgomery or somebody else — should slot in there by the end of spring training as the Cubs are expected to roll with eight arms in their bullpen for much of the season.

The big question with Duensing is how he'll be used in October, assuming the Cubs make it there again. Maddon's bullpen usage in the postseason has been oft-questioned, but he clearly saw something in Duensing that made him lose trust on the game's biggest stage.

Does that happen again in 2018?