Cubs

Cubs think Sorianos bat can still play

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Cubs think Sorianos bat can still play

MESA, Ariz. The Cubs fans who are tired of watching Alfonso Soriano would love to see Dale Sveum bench their 136 million man for not sprinting out of the box.

You should have seen the ball that slammed off the left-field scoreboard at HoHoKam Stadium. Yes, Soriano is feeling very good at home plate.

Soriano smashed two home runs during Tuesdays 11-4 win over the Colorado Rockies, a reminder that he can still be a force, even at the age of 36. Soriano who was batting cleanup as the designated hitter doubled and homered while leading off an inning.

I just prepare my mind to be 100 percent, Soriano said. It doesnt matter leadoff, fourth, fifth, sixth. I just want to be in the lineup and be healthy and help the team win.

My goal (is to) show the fans, my teammates and the coaches that Im here to play the game.

A new Cubs front office with a deep background in statistical analysis knows the lineup debates are just noise. Bill James, the sabermetrics pioneer and Red Sox advisor, was asked years ago about the importance of batting order during a chat with ESPN.com.

There is no real evidence that it matters, James wrote. What matters is having good hitters. Who hits second and who hits sixththere is little evidence that it makes any difference.

Soriano generated 26 homers and 88 RBIs last season and still got booed at the Cubs Convention. He started hitting in January and focused on an agility program at the teams academy in the Dominican Republic. He said it usually takes about 25 at-bats in spring training before he starts feeling comfortable.

His manager is going to do everything he can to make Soriano feel that way. Batting leadoff or cleanup could boost Sorianos confidence. And Sveum knows that he needs Soriano to produce in a lineup that is mostly unproven.

We know 162 games is out of the question, but its vital to keep those legs as fresh as possible to where he can do things like he did today, Sveum said. (Well) give him those day games after night games (off), when we fly back home and then have a day game, things like that. (Its) vital (when) your legs arent what they used to be. But that bat still plays, so its important to give him those breathers.

Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field

Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field

CLEVELAND — Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field.

Namely, the impact the Cubs left on the floor of the visiting locker room.

With 18 months in between visits, one of the first things the Cubs noticed about their clubhouse at Progressive Field was the new carpet.

"It's probably necessary," Joe Maddon said with a smile. "So some good things have come from all that stuff, too, for the visitors. You get new interior decorating."

After the Indians blew a 3-1 lead in the 2016 World Series, the Cubs — and Bill Murray — dumped an awful lot of champagne and Budwesier on the old carpets.

Like, A LOT. 

"Oh yeah," Addison Russell said, "I think we messed it up pretty good."

It'd be hard to fault the Cubs for an epic celebration to honor the end of a 108-year championship drought, especially the way in which they accomplished the feat with maybe the most incredible baseball game ever played.

As the Cubs returned to the emotional, nostalgic-riddled scene of that historic fall, the parallels were striking.

Exactly 18 months before Tuesday, the Cubs walked into Progressive Field for the start of the World Series in 54 degree Cleveland weather with overcast skies and a pestering little drizzle.

Tuesday, the Cubs walked back into Progressive Field in 54 degree Cleveland weather with overcast skies and a pestering little drizzle.

A bunch of Cubs also found their lockers in the same place in that visiting locker room.

Russell, Ben Zobrist, Kyle Schwarber, Jason Heyward, Anthony Rizzo and Jon Lester all have their lockers in the same spots this week as they had for the 2016 Fall Classic.

Some clubhouses go in numerical order, some go based on position groups. The Indians don't really seem to fall under either camp, considering Lester was surrounded by all position players in the corner of the locker room, where — before Tuesday —was last seen giving a heartfelt "thank you" to the media for "putting up with him" all season.

"Just walking back into the stadium from the bus into the clubhouse, you get the sense of nostalgia," Russell said. "I see that they replaced the carpet, which is nice. But yeah, the weight room, the food room, I just remember walking around here having that World Series Champs shirt on.

"It's a great memory. I think this is the same locker I had as well. Everything's just fitting like a puzzle piece right now and it's pretty awesome."

Kyle Schwarber is basically Superman in Cleveland

Kyle Schwarber is basically Superman in Cleveland

CLEVELAND — Kyle Schwarber LOVES hitting in Cleveland.

It's like he morphs into a superhero just by stepping foot into the left-handed batter's box at Progressive Field.

Playing in Cleveland for the first time since his legendary return to the field in the 2016 World Series, Schwarber went absolutely bonkers on a Josh Tomlin pitch in the second inning Tuesday night:

That wasn't just any homer, however. 

The 117.1 mph dinger was the hardest-hit ball by any Cubs hitter in the era of exit velocity, aka since Statcast was invented in 2015:

Schwarber followed that up with another solo blast into the right-field bleachers in the fourth inning off Tomlin.

Schwarber — an Ohio native — collected his first MLB hit at Progressive Field back on June 17, 2015 in his second career game. He went 6-for-9 in that series with a triple, homer and 4 RBI.

Couple that with his World Series totals and the first two times up Tuesday and Schwarber has hit .500 with a .545 on-base percentage and .900 slugging percentage in his first 33 trips to the plate in Cleveland.