Cubs

Cubs won't give Sandberg a September call-up

253336.jpg

Cubs won't give Sandberg a September call-up

Tuesday, Sept. 7, 2010
9:17 PM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

The legend of Ryne Sandberg seems to grow every time another player is promoted from Triple-A Iowa. Everyone wants to know about the Hall of Famer who throws batting practice and rides buses from one city to the next.

Finally, Jeff Samardzija just had to laugh at a reporters line of questioning on Tuesday afternoon inside the Cubs clubhouse.

No, we carried all his bags for him every time, Samardzija said. He big-leagued us the whole time.

Samardzija was joking and in a pretty good mood after being brought up from Iowa along with reliever Justin Berg, infielder Bobby Scales, and outfielders Sam Fuld and Brad Snyder. To make room for Scales and Snyder on the 40-man roster, the Cubs transferred pitchers John Grabow and Esmailin Caridad to the 60-day disabled list.

Barring injuries, general manager Jim Hendry does not plan to make any more September call-ups. And he gave no thoughts to adding Sandberg to the major-league coaching staff for the final 27 days of the season.

No, no, no, never considered that, Hendry said. Thats not something that would be conducive.

Hendry visited with Sandberg last week during a scouting trip to Albuquerque, N.M., but wouldnt classify their meeting as a formal interview during his search for the next Cubs manager.

Sandberg suddenly showing up for work this week at Wrigley Field where the fans adore him and the Ricketts family used to root for him would be a massive distraction to the team.

And it would be unfair to Mike Quade, the other candidate Hendry publicly identified. Quade, who used to manage in Iowa, learned a great deal during his Septembers in Chicago with Dusty Baker. But he also doesnt want to give this up.

Iowas season ended abruptly on Monday with a 7-6 loss to the Memphis Redbirds in Des Moines. At 82-62, Iowa finished tied for first in its division, but Memphis won the tiebreaker and advanced to the playoffs.

Even if the Cubs dont hire Sandberg the Pacific Coast League's Manager of the Year in 2010 his work wont go unnoticed by other organizations.

He never aired us out or (anything) like that, Scales said. I dont think he really had to. We played so well all year long that he just had a steady hand on the team (and) a good pulse on the clubhouse.

For his part, Quade hasnt been paralyzed by decisions, or overwhelmed by the public nature of his job. On the same day Iowa was eliminated from playoff contention, Quade benched Starlin Castro (and did so again Tuesday night).

The manager said he might challenge a veteran, and wont necessarily confront young players the same way.

Some of (Castros) lapses of concentration, Quade said, just (have) youth written all over it. You discipline your six-year-old different than you discipline your 17-year-old. Its case-by-case.

In sitting the 20-year-old shortstop for at least two games, it didnt sound like Quade was acting alone, though he wont be on the phone constantly asking permission.

(Jims) given me leeway to do what I want, Quade said. But I think any time you do something like thisits just not in my nature to do it and not talk to Jim or (assistant general manager Randy Bush) or my staff and say, Look, this is what Im thinking.

I get feedback from all over the place. But Ive been real happy because Jims given me the opportunity and said, Just do it. So in these situations Im kind of doing what I want.

Building consensus will be the responsibility of whoever manages the Cubs in 2011. Its not like hell enjoy the autonomy Bill Belichick does with the New England Patriots, or even the level of influence Lou Piniella used to wield earlier in his career.

Itll be about teaching, reading moods and developing relationships, or what worked for Sandberg during the fourth season of his apprenticeship.

It wasnt anything crazy, Scales said. He knew his team. He knew his guys. And its managing it doesnt matter what it is. Whether youre managing a team or a business, you got to know your personnel, and he did. (He) had a great handle on us all year.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Is this catch by Reed Johnson the best of the last decade?

4-25_reed_johnson_nbc.jpg
NBC Sports Chicago

Is this catch by Reed Johnson the best of the last decade?

Ten years ago today, Reed Johnson had one of the best catches in a Cubs uniform.

On April 26, 2008, the Cubs outfielder made a spectacular diving catch off of Nationals' Felipe Lopez's liner to center field. Johnson had to run to his right in what felt like a mile to track down. He then dove for it on the warning track going head first into the wall. Remember this?

How he caught it? Not sure. And how he didn't get hurt? Don't know that either.

But a lot of members on the Cubs at the time raved about the catch (Len Kasper's call was also phenomenal), and joked that they're happy it didn't happen on W. Addison St.

"At Wrigley Field they might have had to call a timeout to find his head in the vines," manager Lou Piniella said after that game.

There have been some outstanding catches since that catch in 2008. Jason Heyward's diving grab in San Francisco, Javier Baez's catch against the Miami Marlins where he dove into the crowd, Anthony Rizzo's tarp catches. There are a handful of them. 

But where does this one rank?

How often do the Cubs think about Game 7?

How often do the Cubs think about Game 7?

CLEVELAND — Diehard Cubs fans probably think about that epic Game 7 every day, right?

It was — arguably — the greatest baseball game ever played given the stakes (a winner-take-all to end one of the two biggest championship droughts in the sport) and all the wild moments.

The highlights still have the power to give Cubs fans chills 18 months later:

But how often do the guys who took part in that game think about those moments?

This week, as the Cubs split a series with the Cleveland Indians and walked the same steps and sat in the same seats and put their stuff in the same lockers as they did almost exactly a year-and-a-half ago, the nostalgia was undeniable.

The first thing Addison Russell noticed was how he was at the same locker (many Cubs were) as the World Series and the visiting locker room carpet was redone.

He also admitted it felt surreal, almost like a dream.

Kyle Schwarber made that Hollywood-style comeback to be able to DH for the four World Series games at Progressive Field, but he doesn't think about his journey back from a devastating knee injury.

No, he preferred to focus on the Cubs' comeback from down 3-1 in the series.

"I like to think about the World Series," Schwarber said. "I really don't think about all that other stuff. I just think about the games that we played. Pretty much all the resiliency and everything right there that we had and how we faced adversity.

"I don't think anyone here doesn't think about it, because I always think about it all the time. It's that moment that we all live for and it's an addicting feeling and we want to get there again, so we just gotta take it a step at a time."

On the other side of the coin, Cubs manager Joe Maddon insists he doesn't spend time looking in the past.

"Not unless I'm asked about it," Maddon said. "I think I'm really good about turning pages and not even realizing it. I often talk about present tense and I think I'm pretty good about it. Unless it's brought up, I don't go there."

Admittedly, a lot has changed for these Cubs since then.

With World Series MVP Ben Zobrist currently on the disabled list, only 13 of the 25 active Cubs were also active in Game 7.

And given this 11-10 team has "World Series or bust" expectations on the 2018 campaign, there's work to be done and not much time to focus on the past.

Take David Bote — a 2012 Cubs draft pick who was just called up to make his MLB debut last weekend — who watched the road to end a 108-year title drought from afar, but is now in the midst of a bid at a new iteration of Even Year Magic.

"The organization does a great job of being all together and we're in one spot [in spring training], so you get to see and experience it with them," Bote said. "Here, what we're talking about is today and how we can win today. We don't really talk about what happened in the past in '16."