Cubs

The End: Cubs cant see into the future

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The End: Cubs cant see into the future

Box Score
PENA: I'd love to return
READ: Ricketts leaves Cubs waiting for answers
SORIANO: I don't want to be on another losing team
DEMPSTER: It's an end to what's been a rough season

SAN DIEGO They pulled beers from the cooler and stood around the clubhouse, watching the fantastic finishes in Baltimore and Tampa Bay, not wanting to walk out to the bus just yet.

They cheered and screamed at the side-by-side television screens that showed the Red Sox collapsing and the Rays celebrating. No one in the room knew what that meant for their general manager search. But everyone understood that change is coming.

The Cubs knew they werent going to the playoffs months ago. It was a lost summer without much on-field drama or suspense.

Year 103 without a World Series title officially ended inside PETCO Park at 8:13 p.m. Pacific time. The same group that finished at 71-91 after Wednesdays 9-2 loss to the Padres wont be brought back together again.

Another fifth-place finish already cost Jim Hendry his job. It could take down manager Mike Quade and his coaching staff before the next head of baseball operations starts gutting the roster. The blame game will continue in what should be a very long winter.

You can bring here whoever you think the best manager in the big leagues is, Aramis Ramirez said. I dont think its going to be any different. The bottom line is as players we didnt get it done.

The manager doesnt take the field. The players take the field. The numbers dont lie. Go ahead and look at the numbers offensively, defensively, pitching-wise we didnt get it done. The manager had nothing to do with it.

Pitching and defense is supposed to be the name of the game. The Cubs led the majors in errors (134), and their staff never did live up to expectations (4.33 ERA). They didnt hit with runners in scoring position either.

Their rotation couldnt withstand the loss of Randy Wells and Andrew Cashner during the first week of the season. Their roster was paralyzed by the big-money contracts handed out during the final days of the Tribune Co.

The faces of the franchise are about to change.

Ramirez could follow Ozzie Guillen and take his talents to South Beach. Carlos Zambranos collection of bobblehead dolls is already cleared out of the clubhouse, and no one expects to see him pitch for this team again. Alfonso Soriano may have played his final game in a Cubs uniform.

I dont think about it, Soriano said. If they want to trade me, (I) hope they trade me to a good team, a contender. If not, I want to be here. I love it here. It all depends on what they want to do."

The next general manager will probably want to build around Starlin Castro, a 21-year-old All-Star shortstop who finished the season with 207 hits and by reaching base safely in 40 consecutive games. The Hall of Fame requested his jersey from Wednesdays game.

I know I can do better, Castro said.

Besides Castros flashes of brilliance and moments where he totally lost concentration there was the sight of Matt Garza screaming into his glove yet again. And Marlon Byrd kicking his legs into the air after a fastball knocked him to the ground and shattered his face. And Ryan Dempster yelling at Quade from the top step of the dugout.

There was the silence of one of the best-kept secrets in franchise history, Hendry doing his job for almost a month knowing that he was fired. He kept almost the entire team intact at the trade deadline, closed on a draft class that cost almost 12 million and loved calling Zambrano on his retirement bluff.

The Cubs didnt unload Carlos Pena because they wanted the next management team to have the option of re-signing the first baseman, assuming they dont go hard after Albert Pujols or Prince Fielder. Pena watched Wednesdays game thinking this might be the end.

I would be lying if (I said) that didnt go through my mind, Pena said. I try to focus on the fact that I had the privilege of playing for the Cubs. I wore the uniform with a lot of pride and Im very grateful for the opportunity.

I also understand how the business of baseball works and that there are some things the Cubs need to do in the top office. (They) have their hands full (and) I understand that. (I) would love to return. I just really dont know what the future holds.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Offseason of change begins with Cubs firing pitching coach Chris Bosio

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USA TODAY

Offseason of change begins with Cubs firing pitching coach Chris Bosio

"Of course," Cubs manager Joe Maddon said in the middle of the National League Championship Series — he would like his coaches back in 2018. Pitching coach Chris Bosio told the team's flagship radio station this week that the staff expected to return next year. President of baseball operations Theo Epstein didn't go that far during Friday afternoon's end-of-season news conference at Wrigley Field, but he did say: "Rest assured, Joe will have every coach back that he wants back."

That's Cub: USA Today columnist Bob Nightengale first reported Saturday morning that Bosio had been fired, a source confirming the team declined a club contract option for next year and made a major influence on the Wrigleyville rebuild a free agent. Epstein and Bosio did not immediately respond to text messages and the club has not officially outlined the shape of the 2018 coaching staff.

Those exit meetings on Friday at Wrigley Field are just the beginning of an offseason that could lead to sweeping changes, with the Cubs looking to replace 40 percent of their rotation, identify an established closer (whether or not that's Wade Davis), find another leadoff option and maybe break up their World Series core of hitters to acquire pitching. 

The obvious candidate to replace Bosio is Jim Hickey, Maddon's longtime pitching coach with the Tampa Bay Rays who has Chicago roots and recently parted ways with the small-market franchise that stayed competitive by consistently developing young arms like David Price and Chris Archer.

Of course, Maddon denied that speculation during an NLCS where the Los Angeles Dodgers dominated the Cubs in every phase of the game and the manager's bullpen decisions kept getting second-guessed.

Bosio has a big personality and strong opinions that rocked the boat at times, but he brought instant credibility as an accomplished big-league pitcher who helped implement the team's sophisticated game-planning system.

Originally a Dale Sveum hire for the 2012 season/Epstein regime Year 1 where the Cubs lost 101 games, Bosio helped coach up and market short-term assets like Ryan Dempster, Scott Feldman, Matt Garza and Jeff Samardzija. 

Those win-later trades combined with Bosio's expertise led to a 2016 major-league ERA leader (Kyle Hendricks) and a 2015 NL Cy Young Award winner (Jake Arrieta) plus setup guys Pedro Strop and Carl Edwards Jr. and All-Star shortstop Addison Russell.

Bosio helped set the foundation for the group that won last year's World Series and has made three consecutive trips to the NLCS. But as the Cubs are going to find out this winter, there is a shelf life to everything, even for those who made their mark during a golden age of baseball on the North Side.

Report: Cubs fire pitching coach Chris Bosio after six seasons with team

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USA TODAY

Report: Cubs fire pitching coach Chris Bosio after six seasons with team

In Theo Epstein's end of season press conference on Friday he said that any coach Joe Maddon wants back will return in 2018.

Evidently, there's one coach Maddon didn't want back.

According to USA Today's Bob Nightengale, the Cubs have fired longtime pitching coach Chris Bosio.

Bosio served as the Cubs pitching coach from 2012-17. He was the team's pitching coach under former managers' Dale Sveum (2012-13) and Rick Renteria (2014), and was retained when Maddon was hired as manager of the Cubs in 2015.

Bosio, who is one of the most respected pitching coaches in baseball, was instrumental in the career resurgence of Jake Arrieta who captured the Cy Young award in 2015, and the development of 27-year-old starter Kyle Hendricks (MLB's ERA leader in 2016).

One reason that could've led to Bosio's firing was the pitching staff's control issues during both the regular season and postseason, which Epstein mentioned during Friday's press conference. The Cubs issued the fifth-most walks (554) in the National League during the regular season and the highest total (53) during the postseason.

As the Cubs hit the market for a new pitching coach, Nightengale mentioned that one name that could be on the radar is former Tampa Rays pitching coach Jim Hickey, who parted ways with the organization following the 2017 season.

Hickey served as Maddon's pitching coach in Tampa Bay from 2006-2014.