Cubs

Ninth-inning rally earns Garza first win with Cubs

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Ninth-inning rally earns Garza first win with Cubs

Saturday, April 30, 2011
Posted: 9:50 p.m. Updated: 11:15 p.m.

By Drew Silverman
CSNChicago.com Contributor

It was, in every sense, a night of firsts at Chase Field.

The first win for Matt Garza as a member of the Cubs. The first ejection for Mike Quade as Cubs skipper. The first 10-homer April for any Cubs player. And the first month of the season ending on a high note thanks to, of course, a first-year starter.

Darwin Barney delivered a two-out, go-ahead single in the ninth inning, helping Garza earn his first win of the season with a 5-3 victory over the Arizona Diamondbacks on Saturday night.

The decisive rally came compliments of some shaky defense by the Diamondbacks. Included in the ninth-inning sequence was a controversial call at second base that led to Quades early dismissal.

Following the ejection, two of Quade's youngest players came up with big hits. With runners on the corners and two down, Barney laced a single up the middle off J.J. Putz (0-1) to put the Cubs ahead 4-3. Starlin Castro followed with a base hit through the left side to make it a two-run game.

He knows what hes doing, Barney said of Quade. He can get us riled up any time he wants. It was a good time for it.

Carlos Marmol worked around a walk in the bottom of the ninth for his seventh save. The Cubs have now won two straight games after suffering an 11-2 defeat in the series opener.

Whoever coined the phrase 'Pitching is 90 percent of the game' either was really smart or was stating the obvious, Quade said. Its about setting the tone and keeping your club in the game. We feel like we have the guys in place in the rotation.

Making his sixth start with the Cubs, Garza (1-3) truly deserved to win the ballgame. He worked eight innings and struck out 10 his most since striking out 12 Pirates in his season debut. The right-hander allowed just six hits and two walks and finished his night in style, striking out the side in the eighth inning.

After posting a 6.27 ERA through his first three starts for the Cubs, Garza has a sparkling 1.80 ERA in his last three outings.

I dont have to win every game - as long as we win every game I throw, Garza said.

Garza did put the Cubs in a 1-0 hole in the first inning, when Justin Upton doubled with two outs and came around to score on a base hit by Stephen Drew.

However, the red-hot Alfonso Soriano answered in the Cubs next at-bat, belting a first-pitch fastball from Ian Kennedy off the batters eye in straightaway center for his third homer in the last two nights. The mammoth home run was Sorianos 10th of the season, setting a new team record for the month of April.

Soriano wasnt done, though. In the fourth, he delivered a two-out RBI single to put the visitors ahead 2-1. The base hit gave Soriano six RBIs in his last four games after he managed a total of two RBIs in his previous seven contests.

Aramis Ramirezs RBI double in the fifth gave the Cubs a 3-1 edge, but Garza gave the lead back in the sixth.

The Cubs righty walked Chris Young to open the inning. (Note: Young has walked three times in the last two games against the Cubs after walking a total of three times in his first 24 games.) Gerardo Parra followed with an RBI triple to make it 3-2. Garza recovered to strike out Upton, but Drew followed with a base hit to forge a 3-3 tie.

That's the way things stood until the decisive ninth inning, when Marlon Byrd led off with a single. Geovany Soto then bunted to Putz, whose wild throw nearly pulled Drew off the bag at second. Replays showed that the Arizona shortstop held the bag barely but Quade argued ferociously, to no avail of course.

Lets start with that, Quade said. Im very angry. And Im very wrong. (Umpire Dan Bellino) got it right. I was mad at everything and couldnt believe Drew kept his foot on the bag.

A walk to Tyler Colvin then put two runners on before Kosuke Fukudome hit a comebacker to Putz that should have been an inning-ending double play. Putz made a good throw to second base this time, but Drew had trouble getting the ball out of his glove and Fukudome beat the relay to first.

Stephen did everything he could and (first baseman Russell Branyan) had a good stretch, but he just beat it, Putz said. It was just me not making a good pitch with two strikes on a guy, getting ahead but just not being able to finish.

Barney and Castro followed with their base hits, Marmol did his thing in the ninth, and Garza had his first win for the Cubs.

Everyones battling, Barney said. This team doesnt give up. Were just trying to enjoy it, thrive on it, and keep winning.

Notes
Chicago first baseman Jeff Baker was injured running out a grounder in the eighth inning. He was replaced by Carlos Pena after suffering what the team called left shoulder soreness. Cubs pitchers have allowed 11 first-inning runs over their last four games. Chicago matched a season high by homering for a fifth straight game. With his 10 strikeouts, Garza set the franchise record for punchouts in the month of April with 51, surpassing Kerry Wood (46 in 2001). He also temporarily took over the NL lead in the category, passing Giants ace Tim Lincecum, who has 45 strikeouts on the season.

Up next

Casey Coleman (1-1, 7.42) squares off against Daniel Hudson (1-4, 5.64) in Sundays series finale. As was the case with Garza, Coleman will be facing the Diamondbacks for the first time in his career. Likewise, Hudson the former White Sox right-hander has never faced the Cubs before. First pitch is at 3:10 p.m. on WGN.

Box Score

The craziest stats from Cubs 2017 postseason run

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AP

The craziest stats from Cubs 2017 postseason run

The Cubs go home for the winter with a bad taste in their mouths for the 108th time in the last 109 years.

But such is the nature of professional sports, where only one team and its fanbase gets to experience euphoria on the final day of the season.

The Cubs didn't play as well as they would've liked in the 2017 postseason, something they readily admit.

But the numbers behind the October run are pretty astounding.

Here are some of the most eye-popping stats from this fall, courtesy of NBC Sports Chicago stat guru Chris Kamka:

—The Cubs had the second-lowest batting average (.156) of any team in a best-of-7 League Championship Series.

The only team lower is the Houston Astros through five games, hitting .147 entering play Friday night against the New York Yankees.

The next lowest batting averages in a best-of-7 LCS:

.157 - 2012 Yankees
.164 - 2015 Cubs
.168 - 2016 Indians

—The Cubs also had the lowest batting average in a single postseason in baseball history among teams who have played at least eight postseason games.

And it's not a particularly close margin:

.168 - 2017 Cubs
.188 - 2012 Yankees
.198 - 1974 A's (won World Series with no LDS)
.204 - 2015 Cubs
.207 - 1973 A's (won World Series with no LDS)

—2017 was an interesting year when it came to home runs for the Cubs.

In the regular season, the Cubs were 77-37 (.675 winning percentage) when hitting at least one homer and just 15-33 (.313 winning percentage) when not homering.

But in the postseason, that script was completely flipped.

The Cubs were only 1-5 (.167) in October when homering and 3-1 when going homerless.

—The offensive issues go far beyond just homers for the Cubs.

They scored nine runs in that epic Game 5 of the NLDS but scored just eight runs as a whole in the NLCS. 

What's even crazier — all nine runs in Game 5 came without benefit of a homer. Every NLCS run the Cubs plated was off a longball as they went 0-for-14 with runners in scoring position.

And then there's this:

—The difference in offensive execution in the NLCS can be summed up just by looking at the strikeout-to-walk ratio of each team.

The Cubs struck out 53 times in the five games compared to only five walks.

The Dodgers, meanwhile, struck out just 41 times with a whopping 28 walks. 

—A huge reason for the Cubs' downfall was the disappearance of Bryzzo in the NLCS.

Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo combined for a .135/.179/.216 slash line with one walk and one hit by pitch. Their only run and RBI combined came on Bryant's homer in Game 5 Thursday when the Cubs were already down 9-0.

—Here's how each spot in the Cubs order fared in the postseason:

1. 4-for-36 (.111 AVG)
2. 7-for-38 (.184)
3. 7-for-38 (.184)
4. 5-for-33 (.152)
5. 10-for-37 (.270)
6. 7-for-33 (.212)
7. 5-for-30 (.167)
8. 0-for-31 (.000)
9. 6-for-28 (.214)

Total: 51-for-304 (.168)

—In the Cubs' defense, they were going up against an elite starting staff led by Clayton Kershaw (whom they faced twice) and a bullpen that ranks among the best in baseball history.

The Dodgers had the second-best bullpen WHIP in an LCS in baseball history, coming in at 0.294 in 17 innings pitched.

The only team better? The 2005 White Sox bullpen, though they only had to get two outs in that ALCS.

The 2016 Blue Jays bullpen came close, posting a 0.553 WHIP in 12.2 innings against the Indians last fall.

Dusty Baker takes the fall for Nationals meltdown against Cubs

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USA TODAY

Dusty Baker takes the fall for Nationals meltdown against Cubs

The Washington Nationals must have been sitting at home, watching the National League Championship Series and wondering: How did we lose to this team?

The Cubs poured so much physical effort, mental focus and emotional energy into those five playoff games against the Nationals that they didn’t have much left in the tank for the bigger, better Los Angeles Dodgers team that dominated the defending World Series champs in every phase and captured the NL pennant on Thursday night at Wrigley Field.

By midday Friday, the Nationals announced that manager Dusty Baker will not return for the 2018 season, while the contracts for the big-league coaching staff have also expired, leaving a franchise with chain-of-command issues in damage-control mode.

This is a bitter disappointment for Baker, who needs a World Series ring as a manager to put the final bullet point on a Hall of Fame resume and still grumbles about how things ended in 2006 after four up-and-down years managing the Cubs.

Baker, 68, a former Marine, All-Star player and all-around Renaissance man with a great feel for dealing with people and managing the clubhouse, apparently couldn’t overcome last week’s elimination-game meltdown at Nationals Park, where the Cubs hung on for a 9-8 victory and forced Washington into its fourth first-round playoff exit since 2012.

Baker’s in-game decision-making was already under the microscope and his teams have now lost 10 straight postseason close-out games, a major-league record, according to Elias Sports Bureau.

The Nationals also needlessly subjected Stephen Strasburg to withering criticism when Baker said the $175 million pitcher was feeling under the weather — maybe because of Chicago mold and hotel air-conditioning units — and being saved for Game 5. Only to flip-flop and watch Strasburg throw seven scoreless innings in a dominant Game 4 performance at Wrigley Field.

That unforced error and yet another manager search is not a good look for the Nationals, who made the announcement through the Lerner family ownership group after general manager Mike Rizzo repeatedly signaled that he expected to reach a new agreement with Baker after winning 192 games combined in two years and back-to-back division titles.

Since the franchise relocated from Montreal and abandoned the Expos logo in 2005, the Nationals have employed seven different managers and will be starting all over again in 2018, when Bryce Harper will be in his last season before becoming a free agent and probably wondering if Washington can finally get its act together.