Cubs

No pressure: Coleman gets the job done for Cubs

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No pressure: Coleman gets the job done for Cubs

Saturday, April 16, 2011
Posted: 10:33 p.m. Updated: 11:56 p.m.
By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

DENVER Casey Coleman does not pitch scared. Its in his DNA.

Drop Coleman into Coors Field in front of 40,264 fans against the hottest team in baseball and see what happens. The Cubs didnt have much of a choice, but theyve long liked the savvy of this third-generation big-league pitcher.

Coleman kept the Colorado Rockies in check on Saturday night before the Cubs exploded for a huge inning and rolled to an 8-3 victory.

Coleman hasnt eased into this at all. The 23-year-old wasnt stretched out much in spring training that was for Triple-A Iowa. The Cubs viewed him as the ideal insurance policy when someone got injured. They just didnt think it would happen so soon.

Coleman has a clear idea of what he wants to do on the mound and he made big pitches at critical moments. Overall the Rockies went 0-for-12 with runners in scoring position and left 13 men on base.

Hes got a lot of guts, catcher Koyie Hill said. The thing that really helps Casey out is hes the same guy whether hes got a six-run lead or its a tie game. It makes those situations more manageable.

Coleman left with two outs in the sixth inning after a line drive hit the top of his foot. It wasnt a serious injury, but it was time to turn the game over to the bullpen. By then, he had given up only one run on four hits.

Coleman allowed the Rockies (11-3) to get the leadoff man on in four consecutive innings, but minimized the damage. He walked three and hit two more, the cost of establishing a presence inside.

They can take it however they want it, but I dont see that hitting guys is really such a negative all the time, especially for Casey, Hill said. The guys 5-foot-8 Im not knocking him. But its nice to sometimes let them know that hes going to come in there. Those are all accidents, but hes still pitching in, which is a big part of his game plan.

Coleman wont overpower hitters. He has to help himself by handling the bat and fielding his position. He showed all that in the fifth inning.

Coleman singled, raced to third on a double and scored the go-ahead run to give the Cubs a 2-1 lead. Back on the mound, he handled a sharp ground ball, looked a runner back to third and got the out at first. The inning ended with Coleman sprinting to cover first.

Hes got all the intangibles, manager Mike Quade said. Hes not huge of stature. He doesnt light up the gun, but he does everything else to make himself a good pitcher and needs to. He deserves a lot of credit and he should take a lot of pride in that, whether its composure (or) the way he handles himself in the clubhouse.

From Day 1 when he got here: Whos Casey Coleman? Hes been fantastic.

Randy Wells (forearm) and Andrew Cashner (rotator cuff) will be re-evaluated this week. The Cubs will likely go with James Russell on Tuesday against the San Diego Padres. But neither Russell nor Jeff Samardzija is viewed as a fifth-starter solution.

The way it lines up now, the Cubs could win a series against the first-place Rockies and finish 5-4 on this road trip, which few saw coming.

The Cubs (7-7) stepped up their offensive support Alfonso Soriano hit his fifth home run of the season and Starlin Castro hammered a three-run shot into the left-field seats to key a five-run seventh inning.

There are many unanswered questions left about this team. But for one night Coleman showed that his eight starts late last season (4-2, 3.33 ERA) werent a mirage.

As much as anything, this had to be reassuring for the Cubs: Maybe they only have to worry about one rotation spot. If the Rockies and Coors Field didnt faze Coleman, then what will?

I can see how its tough, Coleman said. You get the rubbed-up balls and then throw one pitch and theyre all slick again. So you have to make adjustments, but its definitely good to make it out of here alive.

Box Score

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Offseason of change begins with Cubs firing pitching coach Chris Bosio

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USA TODAY

Offseason of change begins with Cubs firing pitching coach Chris Bosio

"Of course," Cubs manager Joe Maddon said in the middle of the National League Championship — he would like his coaches back in 2018. Pitching coach Chris Bosio told the team's flagship radio station this week that the staff expected to return next year. President of baseball operations Theo Epstein didn't go that far during Friday afternoon's end-of-season news conference at Wrigley Field, but he did say: "Rest assured, Joe will have every coach back that he wants back."

That's Cub: USA Today columnist Bob Nightengale first reported Saturday morning that Bosio had been fired, a source confirming the team declined a club contract option for next year and made a major influence on the Wrigleyville rebuild a free agent. Epstein and Bosio did not immediately respond to text messages and the club has not officially outlined the shape of the 2018 coaching staff.

Those exit meetings on Friday at Wrigley Field are just the beginning of an offseason that could lead to sweeping changes, with the Cubs looking to replace 40 percent of their rotation, identify an established closer (whether or not that's Wade Davis), find another leadoff option and maybe break up their World Series core of hitters to acquire pitching. 

The obvious candidate to replace Bosio is Jim Hickey, Maddon's longtime pitching coach with the Tampa Bay Rays who has Chicago roots and recently parted ways with the small-market franchise that stayed competitive by consistently developing young arms like David Price and Chris Archer.

Of course, Maddon denied that speculation during an NLCS where the Los Angeles Dodgers dominated the Cubs in every phase of the game and the manager's bullpen decisions kept getting second-guessed.

Bosio has a big personality and strong opinions that rocked the boat at times, but he brought instant credibility as an accomplished big-league pitcher who helped implement the team's sophisticated game-planning system.

Originally a Dale Sveum hire for the 2012 season/Epstein regime Year 1 where the Cubs lost 101 games, Bosio helped coach up and market short-term assets like Ryan Dempster, Scott Feldman, Matt Garza and Jeff Samardzija. 

Those win-later trades combined with Bosio's expertise led to a 2016 major-league ERA leader (Kyle Hendricks) and a 2015 NL Cy Young Award winner (Jake Arrieta) plus setup guys Pedro Strop and Carl Edwards Jr. and All-Star shortstop Addison Russell.

Bosio helped set the foundation for the group that won last year's World Series and has made three consecutive trips to the NLCS. But as the Cubs are going to find out this winter, there is a shelf life to everything, even for those who made their mark during a golden age of baseball on the North Side.

Report: Cubs fire pitching coach Chris Bosio after six seasons with team

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USA TODAY

Report: Cubs fire pitching coach Chris Bosio after six seasons with team

In Theo Epstein's end of season press conference on Friday he said that any coach Joe Maddon wants back will return in 2018.

Evidently, there's one coach Maddon didn't want back.

According to USA Today's Bob Nightengale, the Cubs have fired longtime pitching coach Chris Bosio.

Bosio served as the Cubs pitching coach from 2012-17. He was the team's pitching coach under former managers' Dale Sveum (2012-13) and Rick Renteria (2014), and was retained when Maddon was hired as manager of the Cubs in 2015.

Bosio, who is one of the most respected pitching coaches in baseball, was instrumental in the career resurgence of Jake Arrieta who captured the Cy Young award in 2015, and the development of 27-year-old starter Kyle Hendricks (MLB's ERA leader in 2016).

One reason that could've led to Bosio's firing was the pitching staff's control issues during both the regular season and postseason, which Epstein mentioned during Friday's press conference. The Cubs issued the fifth-most walks (554) in the National League during the regular season and the highest total (53) during the postseason.

As the Cubs hit the market for a new pitching coach, Nightengale mentioned that one name that could be on the radar is former Tampa Rays pitching coach Jim Hickey, who parted ways with the organization following the 2017 season.

Hickey served as Maddon's pitching coach in Tampa Bay from 2006-2014.