Cubs

Replacing Marshall wont be easy for Cubs

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Replacing Marshall wont be easy for Cubs

MESA, Ariz. Sean Marshall had the perfect temperament to play at Wrigley Field.

Nothing seemed to bother Marshall, who never complained when the Cubs moved him in and out of the rotation. That sense of calm surrounded him while he evolved into perhaps the best left-handed reliever in the game.

Once the initial shock wore off, Marshall knew why Theo Epsteins front office engineered a four-player trade with the Cincinnati Reds just before Christmas.

I understood the moves they were making, Marshall said. I know its a business and Ive been lucky to be on the same team. I see lefties move all over the league each year, so I was lucky for my time in Chicago. From a business aspect, thats just the way it goes.

Marshall is reunited with Dusty Baker his manager when he broke into the big leagues in 2006 on a team built to win now. He threw one scoreless inning in an 8-6 loss to the Cubs on Monday at HoHoKam Stadium, and the Cubs werent going to find him enough high-leverage situations.

The 29-year-old Marshall who could have become a free agent after making 3.1 million this season decided against testing the market. He recently agreed to a three-year, 16.5 million extension with the Reds, closing the door on a return to the Cubs.

It was something that we thought was a good idea for my family, Marshall said. I understand Ive been very lucky to be in a Cubs uniform for nine seasons. There are a lot of players that get traded every couple years. (I) was always thankful for all my days at Wrigley Field.

The Cubs shipped out Marshall because they think Travis Wood, 25, could be in the rotation for years, and they also got useful pieces in outfielder Dave Sappelt and infield prospect Ronald Torreyes. Marshall could have been gone in months (though even now he still plans to keep his house in the Chicago area).

This could leave a huge hole in the bullpen.

Combined Marshall appeared in 158 games across the last two seasons. He finished last year with a 2.26 ERA and can get left-handed and right-handed hitters out. He would have been an option if closer Carlos Marmol who on Monday walked two and gave up three runs in one inning doesnt return to form.

The Cubs need to identify a second setup man to go along with Kerry Wood. Lefty James Russell who sought out Marshall on the field before Mondays game would like the job.

I know hes been looking forward to the opportunity, Marshall said. I think hes more than capable of doing what I did.

Russell became one of several young pitchers who gravitated toward Marshall over the years. Whether it was leading the relievers out for their pregame routine or at his locker showing them new electronic gadgets, teammates wanted to be around him.

Consistency, really, what else is there to say about Sean? Jeff Samardzija said. Im not just talking about on the field. Sean was great off the field, too. He came in every day and did his work and showed the younger guys how youre supposed to do it. He meant a lot to us.

Marshall saw so much in a Cubs uniform. He pitched for Baker and Lou Piniella. He played with Greg Maddux and Mark Prior, Milton Bradley and Carlos Zambrano. He finished in first place and last. Win or lose, you could find him at his locker.

I loved every moment I spent there, Marshall said. Im kind of the enemy now, but I loved being a Cub. I wouldnt change it for the world.

Is Joe Maddon covering for Wade Davis? Where do Cubs go from here?

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USA TODAY

Is Joe Maddon covering for Wade Davis? Where do Cubs go from here?

Is Cubs manager Joe Maddon taking the heat and covering for Wade Davis while the All-Star closer deals with atypical soreness in his right arm?

“No, no,” Maddon said Tuesday when asked if Davis felt anything unusual that lingered into the National League Championship Series after last week’s all-out effort eliminated the Washington Nationals from the divisional round.

The Los Angeles Dodgers took a 2-0 lead in this best-of-seven bullpen battle without Davis throwing a single pitch, the backlash from Cubs fans, Twitter and the national media again putting Maddon on the defensive, the year after he got second-guessed for pushing Aroldis Chapman so hard during the World Series.

This NLCS truly is a bizarro world, with Maddon comparing the Buster Posey Rule to the Chicago soda tax, getting so little benefit of the doubt – the Cubs really did beat the Cleveland Indians in Game 7 – and working the baseball term “dry-hump” into one answer during Monday’s Wrigley Field press conference.

Maddon said he would have to check first with Davis – who would have almost five full days in between relief appearances – if the Cubs need a four- or five-out save in Game 3.

“Nevertheless, I always check,” Maddon said. “I can’t just assume that.”

Maddon’s Game 2 calculus on Sunday night at Dodger Stadium – sticking with lefty reliever Brian Duensing in a 1-1 game to start the ninth inning and then bringing in John Lackey to serve up the walk-off, three-run homer to Justin Turner – made you wonder if Davis was still dragging after ending Washington’s season and traveling on the overnight cross-country flight that got diverted to New Mexico for about five hours when Jose Quintana’s wife experienced a panic attack.

“I think he just got mentally exhausted,” Maddon said. “Physically, 44 pitches, he hasn’t done that in a while. But also the seven outs and what it meant and the plane ride itself, sitting on the tarmac, there was a lot of non-rest going on right there, so it was harder to recover.

“So, no, he was fine for the last game, but we set up the parameters before the game.”

Maddon is sticking with his story, that he would only deploy Davis in a save situation and not use him for one out against Turner (1.115 career postseason OPS) or have him totally warm up without the guarantee of getting him into the game.

“To put Wade in that position would be wrong on my part,” Maddon said. “We had already talked about the circumstances, so my loyalty there lies with Wade, or my decision-making lies with Wade, nobody else.

“That was a heavy day for him (in Washington). Going into the last game in L.A., like I talked about, we talked about one inning only, and not to get up and not put him in the game.

“If you get him up and sit him down, then you have no idea what it’s going to look like. My responsibility is to him, also, and to the players, so I told him that before the game, so I had to stick with our decision.”

Before finalizing the Jorge Soler trade at the winter meetings, the Kansas City Royals took the unusual step of allowing the Cubs to meet with Davis at his home in New York’s Hudson Valley and go through a physical exam. The Cubs wanted reassurances after Davis spent parts of last season on the disabled list with a forearm strain and a flexor strain.

The Cubs wondered if “dry-humping” had contributed to those injuries, and tried to stay conservative with Davis during his free-agent year, watching him convert his first 32 save chances and using him for three-plus outs only three times during the regular season, all in mid-to-late September.

“If you look at the numbers this year, I thought going into the playoffs his usage has been really good,” Maddon said. “Minimal, in a sense. We didn’t get him up hardly at all where we didn’t utilize him.

“He just wasn’t set up for it the other day. So honestly, I think he’s in really good shape right now, actually. I don’t think he could have gone those seven outs the other day if he had been overly dried up during the course of the season. He felt good. But that was above and beyond, and that wasn’t part of the game plan the other night.”

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Ben Zobrist shares his leadoff approach

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SportsTalk Live Podcast: Ben Zobrist shares his leadoff approach

Sports Talk Live is on location at the Brickhouse Tavern at Wrigley Field to get you set for Game 3 of the NLCS. David Haugh (Chicago Tribune), Jesse Rogers (ESPNChicago.com) and Bob Nightengale (USA Today) join Kap on the panel. 

Plus, Ben Zobrist and Curtis Granderson drop by to talk about the big matchup.

Listen to the full SportsTalk Live Podcast right here: