Cubs

Ricketts changes the Wrigley argument: 'Were not a museum'

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Ricketts changes the Wrigley argument: 'Were not a museum'

The Cubs changed the argument while unveiling their plans to renovate Wrigley Field.

The lobbying efforts will revolve around asking the city to ease restrictions on the ancient ballpark, and not begging for public assistance, which had become such a non-starter, especially during a bitter presidential election.

Chairman Tom Ricketts reset the public-relations campaign on Saturday at the Cubs Convention, with his executives revealing conceptual designs for a $300 million restoration project in front of a standing-room only crowd packed into a downtown Sheraton ballroom.

Ricketts signaled that using amusement taxes to help fund construction is off the table.

The negotiations will center around allowing the Cubs to put up more advertising signage, a move that would take aim at the rooftop owners, and schedule games at times that would maximize revenue. In this light, Sheffield Avenue could be turned into their version of Yawkey Way, the pedestrian space outside Fenway Park, and the Jumbotron-type video board(s) could be in play.

Given that kind of flexibility, president of business operations Crane Kenney said the Ricketts family would be prepared to write the entire check themselves.

"We're not talking about [amusement taxes] right now," Ricketts said. "We're looking at other things instead. One of the ways we look at it is: Treat us like a private institution. Let us go about doing our business and then well take care of ourselves."

The Cubs made a clumsy attempt to get financing in the fall of 2010, asking the state to float $200 million in bonds while the Ricketts family promised to match $200 million more in private investment around the neighborhood. Ricketts father, Joe, runs Ending Spending, the conservative political organization.

Team officials appeared to be making progress last year until a New York Times report exposed the Super PAC backed by the Ricketts patriarch, how it looked into bankrolling racially charged advertisements against President Barack Obama. That power play angered Mayor Rahm Emanuel, the former White House chief of staff. The story went viral in May and killed any momentum.

Ricketts said he still hasn't spoken directly with Emanuel, though team officials are in regular contact with the mayors office.

"They've been very positive conversations," Kenney said. "It's just a matter of [Emanuel] wants to protect the taxpayer. We understand that. This cannot have a negative impact on taxpayers and it has to create substantial jobs. [So the] ticket to play is no negative impact on taxpayers and it has to create a lot of jobs. Everything we've talked about does both of those."

The Cubs claim the project  which will be phased in across five offseasons will create 2,100 jobs. Kenney said the Cubs would not play in another stadium  such as U.S. Cellular Field or Milwaukee's Miller Park  while the renovations take place.

Kenney said the Cubs do not need Wrigley Field's landmark status removed because "most of those elements we would never want to touch anyway -- the marquee and the ivy and the scoreboard."

The Cubs are looking broadly for the city to relax some rules, like permitting them to play 3:05 p.m. games on Fridays, an idea enthusiastically approved by their focus groups.

"We're treated like a public facility, like a library or a school," Kenney said. "Here's what you can do. Here's what you can't do. We, the public, are going to tell you what you can do with your building. [Our] view is: As long as someones going to tell us what we can do, maybe you should help us fix it."
 
This is where the Cubs are framing the debate now. Ricketts is too polite to come out and say it: Get off my lawn. But that could be part of the compromise with the city.

"We're not a museum," Ricketts said. "We're a business."

If you can't wait for baseball to be back, take a look at the Cubs' spring training schedule

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USA TODAY

If you can't wait for baseball to be back, take a look at the Cubs' spring training schedule

Set your alarm, there are only three more months till baseball is back.

The Cubs announced their spring training schedule Monday, getting folks all amped up for the 34 exhibition games in February and March.

Spring game action gets started Feb. 23 out in Arizona, with the Cubs taking on the Milwaukee Brewers to kick off Cactus League play. The Cubs' first home spring game at Sloan Park in Mesa comes the next day, Feb. 24.

In addition to a 32-game Cactus League slate, the Cubs will take on the Cleveland Indians in a pair of exhibition games in Las Vegas. That 2016 World Series rematch comes March 17 and 18.

And of course, there will be three meetings with the White Sox, as both Chicago teams play their spring schedule out in Arizona. Those "Cactus Crosstown" games will be played Feb. 27 and March 10 in Mesa and March 16 in Glendale.

Here's the full schedule:

What if Jake Arrieta stays in the NL Central and repeatedly haunts the Cubs?

What if Jake Arrieta stays in the NL Central and repeatedly haunts the Cubs?

Jake Arrieta in a Brewers uniform?

That's not a sight Cubs fans would like to see, but the North Siders' I-94 rivals are apparently keen on trying to add Arrieta, the free-agent pitcher who's been one of the National League's top arms for the past several seasons.

The Cubs have their own decision to make on whether or not they're going to pursue re-signing Arrieta, a guy who over the past three seasons has posted a 2.71 ERA and struck out 589 batters, winning 54 games in 94 starts for a team that won the 2016 World Series and has advanced to three consecutive NL Championship Series.

The downside to losing Arrieta is obvious, as the Cubs would lose a huge part of their formidable starting rotation, but there would be an added downside if Arrieta were to remain in the NL Central and repeatedly haunt his former team.

Given Arrieta's track record, adding him would make sense for any team in the majors, but the Brewers in particular could use a front-of-the-line starting pitcher to boost their chances of besting the Cubs for the Central crown. The Brew Crew staged a surprising threat to do just that in 2017, perhaps proving that their rebuilding effort has yielded fruit ahead of schedule.

But there are questions in that rotation, with Jimmy Nelson expected to miss time next season after having shoulder surgery. Chase Anderson was great last season, and Zach Davies was solid, too. Brewers starters posted an ERA of 4.10 on the season, good for fifth in the NL. The four teams ahead of them, including the Cubs, all made the playoffs. Adding an arm as good as Arrieta's could make the difference in jumping past the Cubs in the Central and getting the Crew to the postseason for the first time since 2011.

And it'd be a plus for the Brewers to make it so Arrieta couldn't shut down their hitters anymore. In 15 career starts against the Crew, Arrieta is 8-4 with a 2.74 ERA. However, they'd surely love to have him call Miller Park home. He's never lost there in five starts, boasting a 2.03 ERA with 30 strikeouts.

There's an argument to be made that Arrieta would be able to seek revenge on the Cubs no matter what team he ends up pitching for, be it an NL team facing off against the Cubs in the playoffs or an American League squad meeting the Cubs in the World Series. After all, as Scott Boras put it, signing Arrieta is a ticket to "Playoffville."

But should Arrieta make the short drive to Wisconsin and set up shop in America's Dairyland, turning the Brewers into a legitimate playoff contender and challenger to the Cubs' grip on the NL Central crown? Well, consider the Cubs-Brewers rivalry cranked up to 11.