Cubs

The ring isn't everything to Kerry Wood

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The ring isn't everything to Kerry Wood

This is the new Mr. Cub. Kerry Wood has too much invested here to leave now and become a mercenary and chase a ring.

Who knows how long the Cubs will be playing meaningful baseball this summer, or how much Wood will have left when theyre good again. But the 34-year-old reliever has spent almost half his life in this organization, and his family has made this city their home.

Ultimately, that outweighed the interest Wood received from contenders like the Detroit Tigers (before they signed Prince Fielder) and the Philadelphia Phillies. Thats why hes traveling to Arizona this week to begin spring training with a team that has almost no external expectations and is playing for the future.

Even if it took until the middle of January to agree on a one-year, 3 million deal that was synched up to the opening of the Cubs Convention. It was perfect public relations timing, though even chairman Tom Ricketts had to admit: We probably could have done it a little sooner.

One offer from an unidentified team got to the point where Wood thought he was going to take a physical.

It was a three-week rollercoaster there for a little while I was in four different cities, Wood said Monday night before the Comcast SportsNet Sports Awards at the Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers. It worked out perfect. This is where we want to play. But, yeah, its definitely tempting to go win a ring. Thats why we play the game.

If I (had) won a ring with the Yankees in 2010 that would have been great. But I dont think it would have meant as much as spending the time that you spend here on all the bad teams and then turning it around and getting so close. It means more for me (to) be part of a winning organization that maybe turns some things around.

There were veteran guys when I was younger I still remember things that they told me and that still helps. I dont want to be labeled as that guy, but its nice to tell a young kid something and see them go out and figure it out and have success.

Wood can still pitch, but this is a team that will need that presence in the clubhouse.

This winter, the Cubs were content to let the media feed the perception that they were in on all the big-ticket items, and then watch them all the fall off the board: Albert Pujols; Yu Darvish; Fielder; and Yoenis Cespedes, who on Monday agreed to a reported four-year, 36 million deal with the Oakland As.

Looking toward 2014 and beyond, Theo Epstein showed no desire to make a splash, instead buying low on young players with potential upside who are under club control. The new president of baseball operations might be the only one with the credibility to sell a long-term rebuilding process to the fan base.

If these fans are going to be patient, this is the guy theyre going to be patient with, Wood said. Hes got a track record with what he did in Boston and turning that organization around and bringing (that) city (the) championship they desperately wanted and needed for so long.

He was the guy that got it done there. Does it mean hes going to do it here? There (are) no guarantees, but hes got a great owner he works for and hes in the best city, in my opinion, for baseball. He gets the owner on his side and the fans on his side hell do great things.

Epstein has promised that the Cubs will build a sustainable model where theyre playing in October every year. Wood, whos about to begin his 16th season in the organization, has lived through the boom-and-bust cycles at Clark and Addison. His contract includes a 3 million club option for 2013.

At this point, its one year, Wood said. At this stage of the career, I think its a re-assess at the end of the year to take a few weeks off and see where everythings at and see if its something that I want to continue to do. But I feel like Ive got two or three years left. My body feels good.

Theres no announcement or anything (like): This is going to be the last one.

It seems like Wood enjoys not being the story anymore. He understands the pulse of the city better than most players, and knows that right now no ones making big predictions.

Its Chicago, Wood said. Its a result-oriented city. Thats just the way it goes, especially with baseball on the North Side. I dont think anyones expecting us to walk out there and run away with the thing and win the World Series. (Thats) a little delusional. But I think weve got a good enough team to surprise some people and compete in our division.

If any of those future core players emerge in 2012, they might follow Woods example, and ask him about doing your job while handling the spotlight, and what it might be like if the Cubs ever win.

Offseason of change begins with Cubs firing pitching coach Chris Bosio

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USA TODAY

Offseason of change begins with Cubs firing pitching coach Chris Bosio

"Of course," Cubs manager Joe Maddon said in the middle of the National League Championship Series — he would like his coaches back in 2018. Pitching coach Chris Bosio told the team's flagship radio station this week that the staff expected to return next year. President of baseball operations Theo Epstein didn't go that far during Friday afternoon's end-of-season news conference at Wrigley Field, but he did say: "Rest assured, Joe will have every coach back that he wants back."

That's Cub: USA Today columnist Bob Nightengale first reported Saturday morning that Bosio had been fired, a source confirming the team declined a club contract option for next year and made a major influence on the Wrigleyville rebuild a free agent. Epstein and Bosio did not immediately respond to text messages and the club has not officially outlined the shape of the 2018 coaching staff.

Those exit meetings on Friday at Wrigley Field are just the beginning of an offseason that could lead to sweeping changes, with the Cubs looking to replace 40 percent of their rotation, identify an established closer (whether or not that's Wade Davis), find another leadoff option and maybe break up their World Series core of hitters to acquire pitching. 

The obvious candidate to replace Bosio is Jim Hickey, Maddon's longtime pitching coach with the Tampa Bay Rays who has Chicago roots and recently parted ways with the small-market franchise that stayed competitive by consistently developing young arms like David Price and Chris Archer.

Of course, Maddon denied that speculation during an NLCS where the Los Angeles Dodgers dominated the Cubs in every phase of the game and the manager's bullpen decisions kept getting second-guessed.

Bosio has a big personality and strong opinions that rocked the boat at times, but he brought instant credibility as an accomplished big-league pitcher who helped implement the team's sophisticated game-planning system.

Originally a Dale Sveum hire for the 2012 season/Epstein regime Year 1 where the Cubs lost 101 games, Bosio helped coach up and market short-term assets like Ryan Dempster, Scott Feldman, Matt Garza and Jeff Samardzija. 

Those win-later trades combined with Bosio's expertise led to a 2016 major-league ERA leader (Kyle Hendricks) and a 2015 NL Cy Young Award winner (Jake Arrieta) plus setup guys Pedro Strop and Carl Edwards Jr. and All-Star shortstop Addison Russell.

Bosio helped set the foundation for the group that won last year's World Series and has made three consecutive trips to the NLCS. But as the Cubs are going to find out this winter, there is a shelf life to everything, even for those who made their mark during a golden age of baseball on the North Side.

Report: Cubs fire pitching coach Chris Bosio after six seasons with team

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USA TODAY

Report: Cubs fire pitching coach Chris Bosio after six seasons with team

In Theo Epstein's end of season press conference on Friday he said that any coach Joe Maddon wants back will return in 2018.

Evidently, there's one coach Maddon didn't want back.

According to USA Today's Bob Nightengale, the Cubs have fired longtime pitching coach Chris Bosio.

Bosio served as the Cubs pitching coach from 2012-17. He was the team's pitching coach under former managers' Dale Sveum (2012-13) and Rick Renteria (2014), and was retained when Maddon was hired as manager of the Cubs in 2015.

Bosio, who is one of the most respected pitching coaches in baseball, was instrumental in the career resurgence of Jake Arrieta who captured the Cy Young award in 2015, and the development of 27-year-old starter Kyle Hendricks (MLB's ERA leader in 2016).

One reason that could've led to Bosio's firing was the pitching staff's control issues during both the regular season and postseason, which Epstein mentioned during Friday's press conference. The Cubs issued the fifth-most walks (554) in the National League during the regular season and the highest total (53) during the postseason.

As the Cubs hit the market for a new pitching coach, Nightengale mentioned that one name that could be on the radar is former Tampa Rays pitching coach Jim Hickey, who parted ways with the organization following the 2017 season.

Hickey served as Maddon's pitching coach in Tampa Bay from 2006-2014.