Cubs

Scenes from Wrigley Field: Astros shut out Cubs

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Scenes from Wrigley Field: Astros shut out Cubs

Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2010
11:58 PM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

Mike Quade has been recognized waiting for the L, and people wonder what the Cubs manager is doing taking public transportation. From the night of Aug. 21, when he found out that he would be taking over for Lou Piniella, he vowed to do it his way.

Quade grew up in Mount Prospect, so it figured that he wouldnt be blindsided by all the attention his new job would generate. He knows the city, follows its politics and planned to spend part of Thursdays off day catching up on the coverage of Mayor Richard M. Daleys decision not to run again.

The Cubs (60-80) realize how valuable it can be to get away from the distractions of Wrigley Field. This season Carlos Zambrano made his first bullpen appearance in almost eight years in Milwaukee, returned to the rotation in Houston and apologized to his teammates in Colorado.

Starlin Castro had his big-league debut in Cincinnati. And when Piniella talked about starting Tyler Colvin at first base an idea abandoned for now he promised it would be down the road.

So it was for Quade, who managed his first game in the majors 15 days ago in Washington before 17,921 fans at Nationals Park.

Quades first homestand ended with Wednesdays 4-0 loss to the Houston Astros. The Cubs went 5-4 and won two of three series during that time. The 51st manager in franchise history has been calling it a process and said, So far, so good.

Here are a few snapshots of what goes on around the man standing on the top step of the dugout:

Now that Triple-A Iowas season is over, Ryne Sandberg is free to have his formal interview with general manager Jim Hendry. Sandberg has earned the respect of his players, but theyre simply answering questions from reporters, not lobbying for him to get the job. This weeks September call-ups brought another wave.

Rynos awesome, plain and simple, Brad Snyder said. Every day hes the exact same and you know what youre going to get from him. (He) doesnt say a whole lot, but he gets his point across and we know what he expects out of us and we get the job done for him.

There will be inconsistency. One night the Cubs won a game 14-2 with Zambrano, the player they suspended two months earlier in part because of his perceived selfishness. The next they lost 14-7 behind starter Ryan Dempster, who deferred part of his 2010 salary so the front office could have payroll flexibility and add a piece to the roster. Both games came against the Pittsburgh Pirates, the worst team in baseball.

Wrigley Field isnt just an office, and its not only about baseball. During this homestand alone: its smallest crowd in nearly four years came out for Andre Dawson night; Harry Carays statue was rededicated; Billy Williams statue was unveiled; and board member Todd Ricketts filmed an episode of Undercover Boss, a CBS reality show.

The 33,623 fans said to be there on a 61-degree Wednesday night saw Brett Myers retire the first 14 Cubs and give up only three hits across seven scoreless innings. Myers has accounted for at least six innings in 29 consecutive starts, the longest streak to start a season in the majors since 2002, when Curt Schilling did it through 35 for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Randy Wells gave himself mixed reviews after allowing four runs in six innings. Quade indicated that there are no immediate plans to move Wells to the bullpen so the organization can take a look at some other potential starters.

If anything, Quade said, We might end up with a six- or seven-man rotation.

If given the choice of ending the season now and starting over again with 2011 spring training, Wells (6-13, 4.61) wouldnt take it.

You got to try to finish on some kind of positive note, he said. The four days between starts are the worst for me right now. No matter what happens out on the mound or the outcome of the game by far the worst part about it is sitting there waiting. So Im anxious to get the ball again.

Some of the same people that are evaluating Wells are studying Quade, who survived his first homestand as manager surrounded by family, and almost everyone speculating about his future.

(Im) more relaxed, Quade said. Im more comfortable in my surroundings here at home, thats for sure.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Offseason of change begins with Cubs firing pitching coach Chris Bosio

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USA TODAY

Offseason of change begins with Cubs firing pitching coach Chris Bosio

"Of course," Cubs manager Joe Maddon said in the middle of the National League Championship Series — he would like his coaches back in 2018. Pitching coach Chris Bosio told the team's flagship radio station this week that the staff expected to return next year. President of baseball operations Theo Epstein didn't go that far during Friday afternoon's end-of-season news conference at Wrigley Field, but he did say: "Rest assured, Joe will have every coach back that he wants back."

That's Cub: USA Today columnist Bob Nightengale first reported Saturday morning that Bosio had been fired, a source confirming the team declined a club contract option for next year and made a major influence on the Wrigleyville rebuild a free agent. Epstein and Bosio did not immediately respond to text messages and the club has not officially outlined the shape of the 2018 coaching staff.

Those exit meetings on Friday at Wrigley Field are just the beginning of an offseason that could lead to sweeping changes, with the Cubs looking to replace 40 percent of their rotation, identify an established closer (whether or not that's Wade Davis), find another leadoff option and maybe break up their World Series core of hitters to acquire pitching. 

The obvious candidate to replace Bosio is Jim Hickey, Maddon's longtime pitching coach with the Tampa Bay Rays who has Chicago roots and recently parted ways with the small-market franchise that stayed competitive by consistently developing young arms like David Price and Chris Archer.

Of course, Maddon denied that speculation during an NLCS where the Los Angeles Dodgers dominated the Cubs in every phase of the game and the manager's bullpen decisions kept getting second-guessed.

Bosio has a big personality and strong opinions that rocked the boat at times, but he brought instant credibility as an accomplished big-league pitcher who helped implement the team's sophisticated game-planning system.

Originally a Dale Sveum hire for the 2012 season/Epstein regime Year 1 where the Cubs lost 101 games, Bosio helped coach up and market short-term assets like Ryan Dempster, Scott Feldman, Matt Garza and Jeff Samardzija. 

Those win-later trades combined with Bosio's expertise led to a 2016 major-league ERA leader (Kyle Hendricks) and a 2015 NL Cy Young Award winner (Jake Arrieta) plus setup guys Pedro Strop and Carl Edwards Jr. and All-Star shortstop Addison Russell.

Bosio helped set the foundation for the group that won last year's World Series and has made three consecutive trips to the NLCS. But as the Cubs are going to find out this winter, there is a shelf life to everything, even for those who made their mark during a golden age of baseball on the North Side.

Report: Cubs fire pitching coach Chris Bosio after six seasons with team

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USA TODAY

Report: Cubs fire pitching coach Chris Bosio after six seasons with team

In Theo Epstein's end of season press conference on Friday he said that any coach Joe Maddon wants back will return in 2018.

Evidently, there's one coach Maddon didn't want back.

According to USA Today's Bob Nightengale, the Cubs have fired longtime pitching coach Chris Bosio.

Bosio served as the Cubs pitching coach from 2012-17. He was the team's pitching coach under former managers' Dale Sveum (2012-13) and Rick Renteria (2014), and was retained when Maddon was hired as manager of the Cubs in 2015.

Bosio, who is one of the most respected pitching coaches in baseball, was instrumental in the career resurgence of Jake Arrieta who captured the Cy Young award in 2015, and the development of 27-year-old starter Kyle Hendricks (MLB's ERA leader in 2016).

One reason that could've led to Bosio's firing was the pitching staff's control issues during both the regular season and postseason, which Epstein mentioned during Friday's press conference. The Cubs issued the fifth-most walks (554) in the National League during the regular season and the highest total (53) during the postseason.

As the Cubs hit the market for a new pitching coach, Nightengale mentioned that one name that could be on the radar is former Tampa Rays pitching coach Jim Hickey, who parted ways with the organization following the 2017 season.

Hickey served as Maddon's pitching coach in Tampa Bay from 2006-2014.