Cubs

Zambrano's not out of the Cubs picture yet

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Zambrano's not out of the Cubs picture yet

DALLAS The Cubs arent talking about Carlos Zambrano in the past tense yet.

There are enough people left over from the old regime that the new administration knows Zambranos history, how he has said sorry before.

Publicly, the Cubs have presented the opportunity to earn his way back, though its unclear whether its because theyre desperate for innings or trying to create some sort of trade value.

Dale Sveum brought out a familiar talking point on Tuesday in Dallas, saying that a top three of Matt Garza, Ryan Dempster and Zambrano would be enough to hang in the National League Central.

The new manager hasnt spoken with Zambrano yet, but wants to get to know him and is trying to contact every player before Christmas.

I dont think theres a message you send with a guy, Sveum said. He knows his track record. Its not something I have to mention to him. He knows what hes done in the past and knows hes got to change that past. If you put those three guys at the top of your rotation, you got a chance of winning with the bullpen that we have.

The Miami Marlins remain a logical landing spot, because of Zambranos relationship with manager Ozzie Guillen, his close friend from Venezuela. People close to Zambrano say he would benefit greatly from a change of scenery, and would be hungry to prove himself again.

In trying to create the same sort of buzz the Miami Heat did, the Marlins could wind up spending more than 300 million this week on Jose Reyes and Albert Pujols. They are box-office draws and offensive catalysts. But, eventually, the Marlins will have to focus on starting pitching.

Zambrano is owed 18 million next season, while Alfonso Soriano is guaranteed 54 million across the next three years. The Cubs would have to pay a huge sum to get rid of either player.

In general, I think eating money on a deal if the return is right then sometimes it can make sense, general manager Jed Hoyer said.

Both players have no-trade rights, and the Cubs will be extremely reluctant to include those clauses in future contracts.

You never want to say never, Hoyer said, but at the same time, it was a strict policy in Boston against giving no-trades. And I think its the right policy because you end up in those situations where youre in a tough spot. Theyre to be avoided.

The Cubs will have to be creative in finding pitching solutions, because there arent many frontline starters available and the cost figures to be prohibitive. Hoyer pointed to under-the-radar signings like Ryan Vogelsong, who hadnt pitched in the big leagues since 2006 but signed late and went 13-7 with a 2.71 ERA for the San Francisco Giants last season.

Our assessment of Carlos hasnt changed, Hoyer said. Pitchings hard to find, theres no question. I think ideally you need to develop your own. But if you look at where pitching comes from, its not always the biggest names that sign at the winter meetings.

There (are) a lot of guys that have impact and you cant just focus on the big guys (because) some of the best seasons could come from guys that arent being discussed in the lobby this week.

Whoever ultimately reports to Arizona will be working with new pitching coach Chris Bosio. Sveum and Bosio go way back. They played high school football against each other in California and became teammates on the Milwaukee Brewers.

Bosio has credibility after pitching 11 seasons in the big leagues. Sveum described Bosio as a baseball rat who doesnt back down from anything.

The question becomes: Will they have to confront Zambrano?

Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field

Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field

CLEVELAND — Even the Indians can't deny the lasting impact Cubs have on Progressive Field.

Namely, the impact the Cubs left on the floor of the visiting locker room.

With 18 months in between visits, one of the first things the Cubs noticed about their clubhouse at Progressive Field was the new carpet.

"It's probably necessary," Joe Maddon said with a smile. "So some good things have come from all that stuff, too, for the visitors. You get new interior decorating."

After the Indians blew a 3-1 lead in the 2016 World Series, the Cubs — and Bill Murray — dumped an awful lot of champagne and Budwesier on the old carpets.

Like, A LOT. 

"Oh yeah," Addison Russell said, "I think we messed it up pretty good."

It'd be hard to fault the Cubs for an epic celebration to honor the end of a 108-year championship drought, especially the way in which they accomplished the feat with maybe the most incredible baseball game ever played.

As the Cubs returned to the emotional, nostalgic-riddled scene of that historic fall, the parallels were striking.

Exactly 18 months before Tuesday, the Cubs walked into Progressive Field for the start of the World Series in 54 degree Cleveland weather with overcast skies and a pestering little drizzle.

Tuesday, the Cubs walked back into Progressive Field in 54 degree Cleveland weather with overcast skies and a pestering little drizzle.

A bunch of Cubs also found their lockers in the same place in that visiting locker room.

Russell, Ben Zobrist, Kyle Schwarber, Jason Heyward, Anthony Rizzo and Jon Lester all have their lockers in the same spots this week as they had for the 2016 Fall Classic.

Some clubhouses go in numerical order, some go based on position groups. The Indians don't really seem to fall under either camp, considering Lester was surrounded by all position players in the corner of the locker room, where — before Tuesday —was last seen giving a heartfelt "thank you" to the media for "putting up with him" all season.

"Just walking back into the stadium from the bus into the clubhouse, you get the sense of nostalgia," Russell said. "I see that they replaced the carpet, which is nice. But yeah, the weight room, the food room, I just remember walking around here having that World Series Champs shirt on.

"It's a great memory. I think this is the same locker I had as well. Everything's just fitting like a puzzle piece right now and it's pretty awesome."

Kyle Schwarber is basically Superman in Cleveland

Kyle Schwarber is basically Superman in Cleveland

CLEVELAND — Kyle Schwarber LOVES hitting in Cleveland.

It's like he morphs into a superhero just by stepping foot into the left-handed batter's box at Progressive Field.

Playing in Cleveland for the first time since his legendary return to the field in the 2016 World Series, Schwarber went absolutely bonkers on a Josh Tomlin pitch in the second inning Tuesday night:

That wasn't just any homer, however. 

The 117.1 mph dinger was the hardest-hit ball by any Cubs hitter in the era of exit velocity, aka since Statcast was invented in 2015:

Schwarber followed that up with another solo blast into the right-field bleachers in the fourth inning off Tomlin.

Schwarber — an Ohio native — collected his first MLB hit at Progressive Field back on June 17, 2015 in his second career game. He went 6-for-9 in that series with a triple, homer and 4 RBI.

Couple that with his World Series totals and the first two times up Tuesday and Schwarber has hit .500 with a .545 on-base percentage and .900 slugging percentage in his first 33 trips to the plate in Cleveland.