White Sox

14 years later, White Sox Robin Ventura still emotional over 9/11

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14 years later, White Sox Robin Ventura still emotional over 9/11

The emotions from Sept. 11, 2001 haven't gone away and remain strong for White Sox manager Robin Ventura when he thinks about the attacks on the World Trade Center. 

Ventura was a third baseman for the New York Mets when that tragic event occurred and witnessed baseball play a role in healing not only a city but a nation.

“Playing for the Mets that time at Shea Stadium was a place where they put everything," Ventura said. "All the supplies coming into New York were staged at Shea Stadium so we got to see first hand the recovery effort of what we’re trying to do, what people were doing, firefighters coming in from all over the place. It’s sad. We knew some people that had been in there. Everyone knew somebody.”

Baseball didn’t resume across the country until six days later. The Mets were still on the road, facing the Pittsburgh Pirates but returned home on September 21st to play the first professional sporting event in New York City since the attacks. Thanks to a dramatic, late-inning Mike Piazza home run, Mets fans went home as winners that evening against the Atlanta Braves. One moment that Ventura will remember most about that game came in the pregame ceremonies when fallen firefighters and policemen were honored with the playing of bagpipes.

[MORE: White Sox to skip Carlos Rodon’s next start in upcoming series]

“Anytime they play bagpipes for firefighters, policemen anything like that, for somebody to hear that and realize for us every game back you’re always dealing with kids who lost a parent or somebody close to them,” Ventura said. “Anytime you hear that it affects people differently. But it’s hard anytime you hear it.”

The return to New York also made it clear for Ventura and the Mets that they would need to be leaders in helping a city heal and move on from such a devastating day.

“When you play the game in New York, you realize you do actually have to move on and do something. You can’t just stay stagnant and not do anything. It’s hard even as players for us to go out and play at that point because it was there. Everywhere you went you were dealing with people that lost somebody.”

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Rick Hahn gives an update on the state of the White Sox rebuild

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USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Rick Hahn gives an update on the state of the White Sox rebuild

In this episode of the SportsTalk Live Podcast, Danny Parkins (670 The Score), Chris Bleck (ESPN 1000) and Scott King (WGN Radio) join David Kaplan on the panel.

Ryan Pace’s offseason begins. Josh Sitton and Jerrell Freeman are gone, but what will he do with Kyle Fuller?

Plus, Rick Hahn joins Kap from Glendale, Ariz., to discuss the state of the White Sox rebuild, how tough it is to keep their best prospects in the minors and why Jose Abreu is so important for his young team?

Listen to the full episode at this link or in the embedded player below:

White Sox Talk Podcast on The Three Amigos: Jimenez, Robert and Adolfo

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast on The Three Amigos: Jimenez, Robert and Adolfo

The White Sox three outfield prospects are creating a lot of buzz at spring training.

On this edition of the podcast, Micker Adolfo tells Chuck Garfien about a conversation they all had about one day becoming the starting outfield for the White Sox. Adolfo talks about his longtime friendship with Eloy Jimenez, his impressions of Luis Robert, Luis Basabe and the White Sox future.

But first, it's a conversation with MLB.com's Jesse Sanchez who has great insight on many of the White Sox players: Jimenez, Robert, Yoan Moncada and Jose Abreu. He tells an amazing story about why Jimenez decided to sign with the Cubs when he was a teenager, how much Abreu is revered in Cuba and much more.

Listen to the full episode at this link (iOS users can go here) or in the embedded player below. Subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts.