White Sox

Ballantini: Six-man savings sputter out

Ballantini: Six-man savings sputter out

Friday, Sept. 16, 2011Posted: 8:48 p.m. Updated: 9:10 p.m.

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com White Sox InsiderFollow @CSNChi_Beatnik
The Chicago White Sox ran out a six-man rotation as of Jake Peavys return on May 11 and have flirted with it for the balance of the season since then, most recently returning to it by choice (strong starts from Phil Humber and Zach Stewart) and necessity (two doubleheaders in the span of 15 days).

The wisdom of sticking with the unorthodox approach wasnt only driven by starters merit but the thought that few starts at midseason could pay off with stronger finishes in the dog days.

Coincidence, bad luck, or failed wisdom, the six-man rotation did not pay such stretch-run dividends.

For the season, White Sox starters have averaged a 51.5 game score, 4.12 ERA, 1.28 WHIP and 19.0 outs per start. But if the season is cut off after games of Aug. 29, those marks improve to 52.7 game score, 3.88 ERA, 1.24 WHIP and 19.2 outs per start.

In the stretch from August 30 to September 15, the rotation has averaged a 42.4 game score, 4.64 ERA, 1.34 WHIP and 16.9 outs per start. Trim the recent slump more narrowly, to the last nine starts of the season (Sept. 7-15), and the other peripherals hover around the same but the game score average drops to a paltry 39.9.

We did everything for them, White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen said before Fridays game. We shuffled one to another to make sure those guys feeling strong. I dont think Coop, or myself can be blamed, that we didnt do the right thing for them to finish strong, because we did. We had many meetings about that situation because in the past Mark Buehrle kind of tended to lay down a little bit, Gavin Floyd struggled, Peavy was injured, Humber never threw that many innings in the big leagues. We did the right thing for them to finish strong. Right now theyre scuffling, but we put those guys in the best situation. We thought we were going to be in pennant race all the way to the end and thought it would help them.

Humber did not appear to be helping matters, with five runs (four earned) in the first four innings of Fridays game vs. the Kansas City Royals, lining up a game score of 32 to that point.

Ozzie twitterpates dangerously late

In eerie foreshadowing, Ozzie Guillen Jr., oldest son of Chicago White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen, remarked to media gathering in the managers office before Thursday nights game: Dont tweet after 10 p.m.

The son cited an adage that is akin to not picking up the phone for make a call and drunk dialing, referring to the concept of having less clarity in what you write as day turns to night.

Jr.s warning came into play on Thursday night, when his father got back to the team hotel and saw New York Mets manager being attacked by Harold Reynolds on the MLB Network for postgame comments that were critical of his players.

Reacting to Reynolds calling for Collins to be fired, Guillen let loose on Twitter, saying Thas all job is easy to judge manager from the studio, and U dont know what happen. His third tweet on the subject, as Guillen Jr. tried to ease him away from his tweeting phone, said, I know I play the game.

I dont know Terry Collins, a great baseball man, but I dont know him personally, Guillen said before Fridays game, explaining his tweets. But when you hear those comments he should get fired because hes not a players manager and you ask for a guys head?

Guillen thought Collins comments were childs play compared to what he typically says after a disappointing loss.

I stayed up till 1 oclock in the morning to see what Collins said because I think it will be fun, like, Wow, I might learn something from this, Guillen said. I didnt see anything. He just said the players arent playing good. They got swept and left so many people on base. What does the manager have to say? Why cant we get mad? Why cant we say whats on our minds? Why do people say, Well, the players arent going to play hard for him. Theyre going to hate him. Well, at the end of the day, if the players dont play hard for you, youre going to get fired I see the comment Collins made, and thats in diapers compared to the comments that I make. I know analysts are getting paid to criticize people, but when you call for somebodys head, thats different.

Among Guillens final comments directed at the MLB Network was a gem and probably a truthful one at that, given how in demand his services are for postseason analysis is whenever the White Sox arent involved.

Is if my english was better I be doing what u doing lol but you guys cant do what I doing or terry lol lol.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.com's White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox information.

White Sox Talk Podcast: 'Searching for a safe space in Cubslandia'

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: 'Searching for a safe space in Cubslandia'

With the Cubs back in the NLCS, White Sox fans have had to deal with another post-season of Cubs this and Cubs that. How does one escape it? Diehard White Sox fan John Kass of the Chicago Tribune comes on the podcast to talk with Chuck Garfien about his recent column entitled "Searching for a safe space in Cubslandia." Kass talks about how he's dealing with the Cubs success and how White Sox fans can find this safe space. He tells the story about taking the White Sox World Series trophy into a Chicago Tribune board meeting in 2005 to rub it in the faces of the Trib's executives who were all Cubs fans.  

Kass talks about how he watches the Cubs in the playoffs, the Chicago media coverage of their playoff run and how Cubs fans will react if they don't repeat as champions. Garfien and Kass also discuss the White Sox rebuild, the Cubs losing in 2003 and why Kass will be calling Cubs Pre and Post host David Kaplan in the middle of the night if and when the Cubs are eliminated.  

White Sox mourn passing of former pitcher Daniel Webb

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USA TODAY

White Sox mourn passing of former pitcher Daniel Webb

Former White Sox pitcher Daniel Webb died at the age of 28 in an ATV accident on Saturday night, according to Humphreys County Sheriff Chris Davis.

Davis called it a “tragic accident, and we should rally around the family.”

Webb, a Paducah, Ky. native, was with the White Sox from 2013-16 and went 7-5 with a 4.50 ERA.

The White Sox released this statement:

Daniel left many friends within the Chicago White Sox organization, and we are all shocked and stunned by the news of last night's terrible accident. He was a terrific young man with a full life ahead of him. All thoughts and prayers go to his family and friends as they deal with today's tragic news.