White Sox

BBQ: Carlos Quentin Flying the Coop?

243535.jpg

BBQ: Carlos Quentin Flying the Coop?

Tuesday, November 2, 2010
9:14 PM

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

With rumors, whispers, and team sources ever swirling through the offseason, turn to the BBQ to provide a bit of a reality check. Heres an examination of the rumor that Chicago White Sox GM Ken Williams is looking to swap right-fielder Carlos Quentin for St. Louis Cardinals outfielder Colby Rasmus:

Dont Williams and manager Ozzie Guillen like Quentin?

Love him. Both Williams and Guillen expressed support and admiration for their fiery and oft-injured right fielder in their season-assessing comments last month. Williams sees a lot of himself in the youngster, both with their football backgrounds and the challenges that being too intense presents (Williams has lamented that the week-long buildup that football provides is a better fit for his brand of hyperintensity.) Meanwhile the skipper went so far as to call Quentin one of his three model players that September call-ups should emulate.

So why would Quentin be on the trading block?

The reality of the situation is that Williams was unable to translate his intensity to baseball and fears the same from Quentin. If Quentin is unable to stop beating himself up over setbacks, his value dissipates.

Hes averaged just 120 games per season with the White Soxisnt Quentins biggest problem being hurt physically, not mentally?

To the Chicago brain trust, everything negative about young Qfrom his injuries and slumps, even to defensive lapses or awkward work on the basepathsstems not from physical limitations or being injury prone, but self-criticism.
Has Quentin finally gotten the message that he needs to lighten up?

Late in the year, the media-shy Quentin finally acknowledged a need to lighten up. Apparently was convincing enough in meetings with Williams and Guillen for that pair to anticipate big things in 2011, Quentins fourth full major league season.

Is Quentin still a good fit for the White Sox?

Well, the clock is starting to run out on Quentin in Chicago. His defensive lapsesgraver for a right-fielder than when he roamed in leftare now completely offsetting his offensive worth. His best fit with the White Sox, despite being just 28 and with the wear of less than 500 major league games on his legs, is designated hitter. Meanwhile, his yearly arbitration price is only rising (3.2 million in 2010 and a safe bet for 4 million in 2011).

Rasmus is just 24 years oldwhy would he be available?

In spite of Cards GM John Mozeliak giving no indication Rasmus would be dealt this winter, hes yet to hear Williams offer, sure to be Quentin-plus. Rasmus did get in some sort of row with St. Louis skipper Tony LaRussa and while everyone is making nice right now, teams are inclined to make nice with potential superstars.

Wont the White Sox have sellers remorse if Quentin returns to 2008 form?

Even if Q was coming off a near-miss MVP season as was his 2008 (.965 OPS and 36 homers in 130 games), Chicago would be inclined to consider Rasmus, a left-handed batter who is a defensive aid rather than a liability. As superb as Alex Rios was in center in 2010, acquiring Rasmus would push Rios to right, and along with Juan Pierre patrolling left field, would give Chicago center field-speed at all three outfield positions. Offensively, Rasmus is no slouch. Four years younger than Quentin and all-importantly under team control until 2016, the lefty swatted 23 homers en route to an .859 OPS in 2010. He had a colossal 149 strikeouts, but would trim his Ks as he matures.

Would trading for Rasmus affect any other White Sox free agent decisions?

Acquiring Rasmus and his middle-order (he batted fifth for St. Louis in 2010), left-handed bat might also alleviate the need to automatically bring back A.J. Pierzynski and potentially avoid overpaying for a booming lefty like Fielder, Martinez, or Dunn.

BBQ Verdict: Tasty

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.com's White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute White Sox information.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Class A manager Justin Jirschele, youngest manager in professional baseball

justin.png

White Sox Talk Podcast: Class A manager Justin Jirschele, youngest manager in professional baseball

27-year-old Justin Jirschele made quite an impression in his first season as manager of the White Sox Class-A affiliate in Kannapolis. He helped lead the Intimidators to the South Atlantic League championship, and was named White Sox Minor League Coach of the Year. Jirschele came on the podcast to speak with Chuck Garfien about how he went from playing minor league baseball with the White Sox to coaching in their system. He talks about how growing up with a dad who was coaching minor league baseball helped mold him as a manager who is wise beyond his years. Jirschele also gives a report on some of the top White Sox prospects he managed last season such as Jake Burger, Alec Hansen, Dane Dunning and Miker Adolfo.

After baseball punishes Braves, one ranker says White Sox have game's best farm system

1121_chicago_white_sox.jpg
USA TODAY

After baseball punishes Braves, one ranker says White Sox have game's best farm system

The White Sox farm system is baseball's best, according to one of the people making those rankings.

In the wake of Major League Baseball's punishment of the Atlanta Braves for breaking rules regarding the signing of international players — which included the removal of 12 illegally signed prospects from the Braves' organization — MLB.com's Jim Callis tweeted out his updated top 10, and the White Sox are back in first place.

Now obviously there are circumstances that weakened the Braves' system, allowing the White Sox to look stronger by comparison. But this is still an impressive thing considering that three of the White Sox highest-rated prospects from the past year are now full-time big leaguers.

Yoan Moncada used to be baseball's No. 1 prospect, and pitchers Lucas Giolito and Reynaldo Lopez weren't too far behind. That trio helped bolster the highly ranked White Sox system. Without them, despite plenty of other highly touted prospects, common sense would say that the White Sox would slide down the rankings.

But the White Sox still being capable of having baseball's top-ranked system is a testament to the organizational depth Rick Hahn has built in such a short period of time.

While prospect rankings are sure to be refreshed throughout the offseason, here's how MLB Pipeline's rankings look right now in regards to the White Sox:

4. Eloy Jimenez
9. Michael Kopech
22. Luis Robert
39. Blake Rutherford
57. Dylan Cease
90. Alec Hansen