White Sox

With Frasor gone, who's in the Sox bullpen?

627542.png

With Frasor gone, who's in the Sox bullpen?

As Jason Frasor makes his way back to Toronto, the White Sox 2012 bullpen currently has four locks: Addison Reed, Jesse Crain, Matt Thornton and Will Ohman. That leaves three spots open.
One of those will probably go to Zach Stewart to fill a long reliever role, although Dylan Axelrod could pitch his way into a roster spot if he has a good spring or Stewart tanks in Arizona. Maybe the Sox take both Axelrod and Stewart, although whoever doesn't end up in the MLB pen would be better served pitching out of Charlotte's starting rotation.
So with two spots open, here's a rundown of who could break camp with the Sox in early April:
Hector Santiago: The screwballing lefty fits more as a long reliever if he'll be in a bullpen role, but he's perhaps the most impressive arm the Sox currently could call upon. That being said, the Sox could also elect to put Santiago in Charlotte's starting rotation -- a move that would be worth it, since starting pitching is much more valuable than long relief.

Gregory Infante: Control is still an issue for Infante, who walked 32 with 59 strikeouts in 68 13 innings across Double-A, Triple-A and the majors last year. He has a power arm but not the gaudy minor league strikeout totals to back it up. That being said, he's on the 40-man roster and will be 25 in July. He's also one of the better options the Sox have under their control at this point, which, depending on your point of view, may not be a good thing.
Brian Bruney: The Sox brought Bruney back on a minor-league contract with an invite to spring training after the righty posted a 5.87 ERA with the Sox in 2011. He had some decent results in the majors before regressing hard in his final few games, after which he was designated for assignment. He doesn't have much upside, but at least the Sox will be aware of what they're getting if he winds up in the 2012 bullpen.
Jhan Marinez: One of the players the Sox received from Miami in the Ozzie Guillen swap, Marinez is a power arm with even more control issues than Infante. Over 58 innings in Double-A last season, Marinez walked 42 with 74 strikeouts. It's hard to imagine the Sox going with a guy who averaged 6.5 walks per nine innings unless he blows everyone away in the spring.
Deunte Heath: Another guy with control issues, Heath walked 62 in 102 23 innings splitting time between the rotation and bullpen in Charlotte last year. He did strike out 117 and does have the ability to throw multiple innings, but he didn't walk a batter in just two of his 14 relief appearances in Triple-A last year. And he walked two or more in half of those appearances.
Simon Castro: The righty acquired from San Diego in the Carlos Quentin trade may ultimately wind up as a reliever, but the Sox will almost certainly give him a shot at starting first before dumping him in the bullpen.
Jacob Petricka: He's another guy who may wind up pitching in relief but will get a shot to start next season, albeit at Double-A.
Other less likely candidates: Anthony Carter, Nathan Jones, Donnie Veal
An outside source: Adding a reliever via either free agency or a trade could be a route the Sox go, but if they do, they need to be careful to not overpay for the fourth or fifth guy out of their bullpen -- in other words, someone who won't have as big an impact as Thornton, Crain or Reed.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Class A manager Justin Jirschele, youngest manager in professional baseball

justin.png

White Sox Talk Podcast: Class A manager Justin Jirschele, youngest manager in professional baseball

27-year-old Justin Jirschele made quite an impression in his first season as manager of the White Sox Class-A affiliate in Kannapolis. He helped lead the Intimidators to the South Atlantic League championship, and was named White Sox Minor League Coach of the Year. Jirschele came on the podcast to speak with Chuck Garfien about how he went from playing minor league baseball with the White Sox to coaching in their system. He talks about how growing up with a dad who was coaching minor league baseball helped mold him as a manager who is wise beyond his years. Jirschele also gives a report on some of the top White Sox prospects he managed last season such as Jake Burger, Alec Hansen, Dane Dunning and Miker Adolfo.

After baseball punishes Braves, one ranker says White Sox have game's best farm system

1121_chicago_white_sox.jpg
USA TODAY

After baseball punishes Braves, one ranker says White Sox have game's best farm system

The White Sox farm system is baseball's best, according to one of the people making those rankings.

In the wake of Major League Baseball's punishment of the Atlanta Braves for breaking rules regarding the signing of international players — which included the removal of 12 illegally signed prospects from the Braves' organization — MLB.com's Jim Callis tweeted out his updated top 10, and the White Sox are back in first place.

Now obviously there are circumstances that weakened the Braves' system, allowing the White Sox to look stronger by comparison. But this is still an impressive thing considering that three of the White Sox highest-rated prospects from the past year are now full-time big leaguers.

Yoan Moncada used to be baseball's No. 1 prospect, and pitchers Lucas Giolito and Reynaldo Lopez weren't too far behind. That trio helped bolster the highly ranked White Sox system. Without them, despite plenty of other highly touted prospects, common sense would say that the White Sox would slide down the rankings.

But the White Sox still being capable of having baseball's top-ranked system is a testament to the organizational depth Rick Hahn has built in such a short period of time.

While prospect rankings are sure to be refreshed throughout the offseason, here's how MLB Pipeline's rankings look right now in regards to the White Sox:

4. Eloy Jimenez
9. Michael Kopech
22. Luis Robert
39. Blake Rutherford
57. Dylan Cease
90. Alec Hansen