White Sox

Ozzie unloads on Ohman; Quentin keeps it cool

Ozzie unloads on Ohman; Quentin keeps it cool

Tuesday, April 5, 2011
Posted 8:07 p.m. Updated 8:42 p.m.

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Chicago White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen remained supportive of beleaguered reliever Will Ohman, who packed a 27.00 ERA with him from Cleveland to Kansas City. But that doesnt mean he was unwilling to give the crafty lefty a kick in the hiney.

Hes hereI have to use him. Weve got only 11 pitchers, Guillen said before the White Sox faced the Royals on Tuesday. I dont have the luxury to matchup Ohman to lefties. Maybe later on I will. But hes got to get his head out of his a.

Guillen was speaking soberly, but with a smile, knowing full well that the White Soxs 2-1 start has been somewhat shadowed by the troubles his bullpen has encountered. The poster boy for those troubles so far has been Ohman, a nine-year veteran signed this offseason to a two-year, 4 million deal.

I dont want to punish the kid, Guillen continued. He had what, two bad games? He knows that, we all know that. Im not going to change anything. I dont care what the fans think or what the media says. Its my problem He needs to pitch.

Ohman, while clearly scuffling in Cleveland, pronounced himself fully healthy and ready for more relief work, ASAP. His usual wry manner accompanied his diagnosis of the Wahoos series: When you throw the ball over the middle of the plate, guys hit it, and thats what it was. When I left the ball up, they hit it, and when I left the ball over the middle, they hit it.

Especially considering his team broke camp with just 11 pitchers, Guillen knows how important a productive Ohman is.

We need him pitching, he said. If hes not going to help us, well put people in his place that will I want to show this kid I still have confidence in him and that he can get people out. I still believe he can help us.

To that end, Guillen ran Ohman right back out on Sunday after a poor season debut on Opening Day.

The reason I put him back in on Sunday was to let him regroup, Guillen said. We were already losing; giving him another inning gives us a chance to rest the other relievers, but he couldnt do it.

Guillen was aware that he was catching criticism for his use of Ohman in the opening series, and predictably, the confident manager could care less.

I will take the blame every time the kids on the mound, Guillen said. I will take all the heat. Its my problem, however good or bad hes going to pitch.

Carlos Quentin, one day after being named the first AL Player of the Week for his offensive outburst vs. the Cleveland Indians during opening weekend, called the award a nice surprise but couched it in the context of how nice it was, with two wins in Cleveland.

Quentin went 6-for-11 in three starts over the weekend, getting on base at a .583 clip and slugging 1.091 for an outrageous 1.674 OPS. While the White Sox mostly pummeled Wahoos pitching, slugging at a .459 clip, only Adam Dunns eight total bases approached Quentins tidy dozen in Cleveland.

Through three games, Quentin led the AL in batting average (.545) and is tied for the lead in doubles (three) and RBI (seven).

The occasionally-manic right fielder credited an improved mental and emotional approach to the game for his early success.

What I was looking for was a chance to build on things, develop good habits on and off the field, and set a routine I feel comfortable with, day-in and day-out, Quentin said. Thats what I'm going to do, come in here and, for lack of better way to say it, do my work, play the game. Either way it turns out Ill hope for the victory, go home at night and know everything I did was said and done, turn in my card, punch it and come back the next day.

Quentin also credited his veteran teammates for contributing to a more mature and mentally strong approach so far this season. His willingness to learn from them could contribute to more than one Player of the Week honor this season, as Quentin is the consummate strap-Sox-on-his-back slugger.

There are great mentors on this team, professionals playing longer than I have, Quentin said. Im always watching and always want to treat every day the same, whether it be good or bad. I want to learn and pay attention to people who are successfultry to pay attention to and copy them.

Quentin's new approach

Carlos Quentin, one day after being named the first AL Player of the Week for his offensive outburst vs. the Cleveland Indians during opening weekend, called the award a nice surprise but couched it in the context of how nice it was, with two wins in Cleveland.

Quentin went 6-for-11 in three starts over the weekend, getting on base at a .583 clip and slugging 1.091 for an outrageous 1.674 OPS. While the White Sox mostly pummeled Wahoos pitching, slugging at a .459 clip, only Adam Dunns eight total bases approached Quentins tidy dozen in Cleveland.

Through three games, Quentin led the AL in batting average (.545) and is tied for the lead in doubles (three) and RBI (seven).

The occasionally-manic right fielder credited an improved mental and emotional approach to the game for his early success.

What I was looking for was a chance to build on things, develop good habits on and off the field, and set a routine I feel comfortable with, day-in and day-out, Quentin said. Thats what I'm going to do, come in here and, for lack of better way to say it, do my work, play the game. Either way it turns out Ill hope for the victory, go home at night and know everything I did was said and done, turn in my card, punch it and come back the next day.

Quentin also credited his veteran teammates for contributing to a more mature and mentally strong approach so far this season. His willingness to learn from them could contribute to more than one Player of the Week honor this season, as Quentin is the consummate strap-Sox-on-his-back slugger.

There are great mentors on this team, professionals playing longer than I have, Quentin said. Im always watching and always want to treat every day the same, whether it be good or bad. I want to learn and pay attention to people who are successfultry to pay attention to and copy them.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.coms White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox information.

Meet the Prospects: Carson Fulmer

Meet the Prospects: Carson Fulmer

The White Sox rebuild is in full swing. While it might still be a year or two before the big league team is expected to start competing for championships, the minor leagues are stocked with highly touted talent fans will be eagerly following in 2018. With that in mind, it's time to Meet the Prospects and get to know the future of the South Side.

Carson Fulmer

Fulmer, the 24-year-old right-handed hurler, looks to be on the verge of getting his chance to show the White Sox what he can do as a starter at the major league level.

In other words, he won't be a prospect for much longer.

A Florida native, Fulmer was the eighth-overall pick in the 2015 draft. After pitching at Vanderbilt University, he made eight 2015 starts at Class A Winston-Salem, posting a 2.05 ERA in 22 innings. Things didn't go quite as well in his first full professional season in 2016. He made 17 starts at Double-A Birmingham, turning in a 4.76 ERA there. He made four more at Triple-A Charlotte and had a 3.94 ERA in a mere 16 innings. He also got some work out of the big league bullpen that year, struggling to the tune of 11 runs surrendered in 11.2 innings of work.

Fulmer's ERA continued to jump in 2017, all the way up to 5.79 in his 25 starts at Charlotte. He again got some big league time, though, starting in five of his seven appearances with the White Sox. Throw out the first start, an emergency spot start in one half of a doubleheader in which he got shelled, and the late-season results are a lot more promising. In his final four starts of the season, all in September, Fulmer gave up just three runs in 17.1 innings, striking out 16 batters.

Fulmer figures to be given a shot at a spot in the White Sox rotation this spring, as the team is eager to see what they have and see if Fulmer can carve out his own spot in a crowded projected rotation of the future.

As of their most recent rankings, MLB Pipeline had Fulmer rated as the No. 9 prospect in the White Sox organization.

Get to know Fulmer in the video above.

Meet the Prospects: Zack Burdi

Meet the Prospects: Zack Burdi

The White Sox rebuild is in full swing. While it might still be a year or two before the big league team is expected to start competing for championships, the minor leagues are stocked with highly touted talent fans will be eagerly following in 2018. With that in mind, it's time to Meet the Prospects and get to know the future of the South Side.

Zack Burdi

Burdi, the 22-year-old right-handed hurler, has only thrown 71.1 innings in his two seasons with the White Sox.

A Downers Grove native, Burdi was a first-round draft pick in 2016 and already is at the Triple-A level. After playing college ball at the University of Louisville and posting a 3.32 ERA in 26 games over four different levels of minor league baseball in 2016, Burdi tossed just 33.1 innings at Charlotte last season. He turned in a 4.05 ERA in 29 appearances for the Knights before his season came to an end in early July.

As of their most recent rankings, MLB Pipeline had Burdi rated as the No. 12 prospect in the White Sox organization.

Get to know Burdi in the video above.