White Sox

The return for Gavin Floyd

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The return for Gavin Floyd

Today's bogus rumor: The Blue Jays and White Sox had agreed to a swap that would send Gavin Floyd to Toronto for pitchers Deck McGuire and Kyle Drabek.

There are about 100 reasons why this rumor is bogus -- it came from someone who claimed his cousin married Floyd or something and seriously, Toronto is not trading those two guys for Floyd.

That being said, Eno Sarris of FanGraphs viewed the rumor as a good thinking exercise regarding Floyd's trade value. That's a good way to take a false rumor -- as an aside, please, if you don't have sources don't act like you do, it's just annoying -- especially because the idea of a Drabek-for-Floyd swap isn't entirely outlandish.

Drabek was the centerpiece going to Toronto in the Roy Halladay trade of a few years ago, but he completely wiped out in 2011. He had some horrific control issues with the Blue Jays, walking more than he struck out in 78 23 innings. After being sent back to Triple-A, Drabek actually pitched worse, although he did manage to barely strikeout more than he walked.

He's 24 and isn't all that far-removed from success. His struggles weren't an issue of velocity, which is good -- everything appears to be mental, mechanical or some combination of the two.

But would he be an acceptable return for Floyd?

My first reaction was no, the Sox shouldn't take another flier on someone who struggled in 2011 as they did with Simon Castro. But Floyd hasn't thrown 200 innings in the last three seasons and has posted an ERA above 4 in each of them. His FIPs have been around .50 points lower than his ERA, which normally would be an encouraging sign -- but three years is a pretty decent trend, and FIP or not, Floyd's pretty much a 190-inning, 4.00 ERA guy.

That's not bad, but there's not a ton of room for improvement there, either. Floyd will be 29 later this month, which is solidly in his prime. Essentially, what you see is what you get from Floyd.

He's still a bargain, making 7 million in 2012 with a 9.5 million club option for 2013 that's likely to be picked up. Given the going rate for pitching, that's a fair-at-worst deal.

But Floyd isn't someone a team will deal premium talent like McGuire for. So that means the Sox could either acquire once-premium talent (like Drabek) or good talent (like a few B-grade prospects).

Given the need for pitching in the farm system, the safe option would be to go with, say, a B and B-minusC-plus pitcher in exchange for Floyd. Drabek is intriguing, and maybe he'd be another Don Coooper success story. But he's not an ideal return for Floyd.

Of course, this is all hypothetical. We have no idea if the Sox have even discussed Floyd with Toronto, or if Drabek's name has even come up. But it's still interesting to discuss in relation to Floyd's trade value.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Class A manager Justin Jirschele, youngest manager in professional baseball

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White Sox Talk Podcast: Class A manager Justin Jirschele, youngest manager in professional baseball

27-year-old Justin Jirschele made quite an impression in his first season as manager of the White Sox Class-A affiliate in Kannapolis. He helped lead the Intimidators to the South Atlantic League championship, and was named White Sox Minor League Coach of the Year. Jirschele came on the podcast to speak with Chuck Garfien about how he went from playing minor league baseball with the White Sox to coaching in their system. He talks about how growing up with a dad who was coaching minor league baseball helped mold him as a manager who is wise beyond his years. Jirschele also gives a report on some of the top White Sox prospects he managed last season such as Jake Burger, Alec Hansen, Dane Dunning and Miker Adolfo.

After baseball punishes Braves, one ranker says White Sox have game's best farm system

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USA TODAY

After baseball punishes Braves, one ranker says White Sox have game's best farm system

The White Sox farm system is baseball's best, according to one of the people making those rankings.

In the wake of Major League Baseball's punishment of the Atlanta Braves for breaking rules regarding the signing of international players — which included the removal of 12 illegally signed prospects from the Braves' organization — MLB.com's Jim Callis tweeted out his updated top 10, and the White Sox are back in first place.

Now obviously there are circumstances that weakened the Braves' system, allowing the White Sox to look stronger by comparison. But this is still an impressive thing considering that three of the White Sox highest-rated prospects from the past year are now full-time big leaguers.

Yoan Moncada used to be baseball's No. 1 prospect, and pitchers Lucas Giolito and Reynaldo Lopez weren't too far behind. That trio helped bolster the highly ranked White Sox system. Without them, despite plenty of other highly touted prospects, common sense would say that the White Sox would slide down the rankings.

But the White Sox still being capable of having baseball's top-ranked system is a testament to the organizational depth Rick Hahn has built in such a short period of time.

While prospect rankings are sure to be refreshed throughout the offseason, here's how MLB Pipeline's rankings look right now in regards to the White Sox:

4. Eloy Jimenez
9. Michael Kopech
22. Luis Robert
39. Blake Rutherford
57. Dylan Cease
90. Alec Hansen