White Sox

Sox Drawer: For starters, Peavy will... Sale won't


Sox Drawer: For starters, Peavy will... Sale won't

Thursday, Feb. 17, 2011
Posted 9:05 p.m.

By Chuck Garfien

Glendale, Ariz. - When Jake Peavy arrived for his physical Thursday at Camelback Ranch a towering figure hovered a few feet away, anxiously hoping the doctors wouldnt find any snags in the comeback of his 55 million dollar pitcher.

Fortunately for White Sox GM Kenny Williams, Peavy received a clean bill of health, and Day One of White Sox spring training was underway.

Peavy went to his locker and spoke to the media about patience, a word that had never existed in the mans vocabulary until reality struck his body like a lightning bolt last July when the former Cy Young winner tore the lat muscle in the back of his shoulder - a clean rip off the bone.

His season over. His career? Still to be determined.

And yet there was Peavy taking the mound, throwing 40 pitches to catcher A.J. Pierzynski, a session Peavy described as free and easy, and added, Were going ahead and feel like Im one of the guys.

Good sign. And then came another.

WATCH: Thornton wants to close

Chris Sale is going to be in the bullpen. That was Williams, around five minutes into his media session, announcing that Sale (the perceived Peavy insurance policy), would not be needed in the rotation after all.

Why the quick and sudden turnaround? Heres one reason:

I wanted three lefties (in the bullpen) because there are a few players in the division that get on my nerves, and Im tired of watching them run around the bases, Williams said.

Oh, you mean Joe Mauer, Justin Morneau, and Shin-Soo Choo? Got it.

And heres the other reason: The Sox are quietly and cautiously optimistic that Peavy will be able to return sooner rather than later. Williams even mentioned the possibility of Peavy taking the mound when his first start comes up April 10th... if things went his way.

But considering the severity of the injury and the Sox priority to be very cautious with him, Peavy will more than likely miss the first month of the season (2 or 3 starts), and hopefully be ready by May.

It's our job to make sure that competitive nature doesn't get the best of him, and get him to point where he's doing something more premature than he should," Williams said. "We will watch him closely and be very cautious dealing with him as I explained to him today. Whenever he gets out there we want him at 100 percent. We don't want him to start at 80 percent and then stay at 80 percent because he hasn't given himself that extra three weeks or a month."

Williams cautioned that there could be some blips along the way in Peavys recovery.

"That's obviously not what you want to hear, but I'm going to listen to my body, Peavy said. At the same time, I'm going to push it as hard as I can push it to get back out there. But at the same time, I have to be honest with myself and the staff. I'm excited. I really don't think I'm going to be that far behind."

For a competitor like Peavy, talking over and over again about injuries and not victories has burned the fire inside him even more. But it's also changed his perspective about his baseball career.

"The last few years have been tough for me," Peavy admitted. "To be healthy for eight years in your career and never miss any significant time, and then be traded and miss all the time that I've missed here, it's been frustrating. But at the same time, I have a greater appreciation to be here, to play the game and be healthy when you are healthy."

So White Sox fans, keep your fingers crossed, and believe in the power of healing.

"I have a lot of motivation to get back out there and play, and be who I can be."

He's not close. But closer.

Chuck Garfien hosts White Sox Pregame and Postgame Live on Comcast SportsNet with former Sox sluggers Frank Thomas and Bill Melton. Follow Chuck @ChuckGarfien on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox news and views.

Will Ozzie Guillen ever manage again? 'I think my time's going to come up, maybe'


Will Ozzie Guillen ever manage again? 'I think my time's going to come up, maybe'

Will Ozzie Guillen ever manage again?

He was the guy who helped bring a World Series championship to the South Side in 2005 hasn't been a big league skipper since 2012, in his one ill-fated season managing the Miami Marlins. But his name has come up as a social-media suggestion for open jobs for years, including just two winters ago when the White Sox needed to replace Robin Ventura.

But Guillen, who spent eight seasons as the White Sox manager, said on the latest edition of the White Sox Talk Podcast that he hasn't interviewed for any jobs since leaving the Marlins and discussed the trend of hiring young managers who just recently finished their playing careers.

"A couple tried, not to interview me but say, 'Can we talk to you about it?' And I knew I'm not going to be the manager of that team," Guillen told NBC Sports Chicago's Chuck Garfien. "When you look at the manager list, you're going to interview me and you have kid, kid, kid, kid, kid, Ozzie. What's the chance I'm going to manage that team? None. 'Thank you for thinking about me,' and it's cool.

"I've known I'm not going to be the guy because the list. Before, they interview you for a managing job, it's two or three or four guys. Now they've got 30. Nowadays, it's harder to become a manager than win the World Series. Because there are so many interviews.

But does that mean he'll never manage again?

"I think my time's going to come up, maybe," Guillen said. "I always think about (former Florida Marlins manager) Jack McKeon. Jack McKeon was out of baseball for 30 years and all of a sudden came out and won the World Series (in 2003). ... I hope I don't die before that. Jack was 70-plus when he was managing. But we'll see."

Guillen talked about his hopes to be more involved in the White Sox organization after the way his tenure ended back in 2011, saying he hopes to be at spring training with the team one day.

"I'd like to go to spring training with them, that's the first time I'm going to say that, just because I see everybody in baseball, they're bringing former players to the field," he said. "But the problem is, I go there, here we go. 'Why is it ... you're coming here?'

"I don't (want to be a distraction), and I never will be."

Hear more of Garfien's interview with Guillen on the White Sox Talk Podcast.

Eighteen White Sox questions for 2018: Will Avisail Garcia be on the White Sox by season's end?


Eighteen White Sox questions for 2018: Will Avisail Garcia be on the White Sox by season's end?

White Sox fans might have their eyes on the future, but the 2018 season has plenty of intrigue all its own. As Opening Day nears, let's take a look at the 18 most pressing questions for the 2018 edition of the South Side baseball team.

Avisail Garcia was great last year for the White Sox.

But does that mean he's a long-term part of this rebuilding team or a potential trade piece?

How Garcia follows things up in 2018 will go a long way in determining the answer to that question, as well as a perhaps more pressing one: Will Garcia still be on the White Sox when the 2018 campaign comes to a close?

Whatever your scouting-eye impressions might have been, statistically, Garcia was one of baseball's best hitters last season. He ranked second in the American League with a .346 batting average. Only league MVP Jose Altuve ranked above Garcia. The White Sox right fielder also ranked sixth in the AL with a .380 on-base percentage. His .885 OPS ranked in the top 10 in the Junior Circuit.

It was the much-anticipated breakout for a guy who's had big expectations ever since he hit the bigs as a 21-year-old in 2012, when he carried a pressure-packed comparison to Detroit Tigers teammate and future Hall of Famer Miguel Cabrera. After coming to the South Side in a mid-2013 trade, his first three seasons were impacted by injuries and featured an unimpressive .250/.308/.380 slash line with only 32 homers in 314 games.

But last season, that all changed. He had a career year, slashing .330/.380/.506 with 18 homers, 80 RBIs, 27 doubles and 171 hits. Garcia was named to the AL All-Star team and established himself as the second best hitter on a team where the best hitter, Jose Abreu, is one of baseball's most productive and most consistent.

So can he do it again? That remains to be seen, of course. The scale of the improvements in so many statistical categories make one think that Garcia being able to do it two years in a row would almost be as surprising or more surprising than him doing it just once.

But if Garcia can repeat his performance, at least in the season's first few months, he could potentially draw the eyes of numerous contending teams looking for a bat to add to their lineups. One season of production perhaps wasn't enough to demand the kind of return package Rick Hahn's front office got in return for Chris Sale, Adam Eaton and Jose Quintana. But a few good months at the outset of 2018 could draw plenty of interest, making the question of whether Garcia will stay in a White Sox uniform for the entirety of the season a valid one.

All that being said, Garcia's situation — he's under team control for two more seasons — allows the White Sox to be flexible. Garcia's still young, entering his age-27 season. The White Sox could opt to keep a talented hitter, extend him and make him a part of the rebuilding effort, penciling him into the lineup of the future alongside younger hitters like Yoan Moncada, Eloy Jimenez and Luis Robert. Or they could wait to move him, perhaps next offseason or at the 2019 trade deadline.

But Garcia's performance will dictate how viable each of those options ends up being. He finally put it all together in 2017. In 2018, he'll have to keep it all together.