White Sox

Sox Drawer: The White Sox on 911

533534.jpg

Sox Drawer: The White Sox on 911

Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011
Posted: 3:09 p.m.

By Chuck Garfien
CSNChicago.com
It was the most devastating thing that your mind could ever imagine. -- Hawk Harrelson

They were saying 10-12 planes were unaccounted for, and were staying at Grand Central Station. We said, Lets get out of here. -- Paul Konerko
It was the first time I actually thought we were going to die.-- Mark Buehrle

At 2:00 a.m. of the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, the Chicago White Sox arrived at the Grand Hyatt Hotel in the heart of Manhattan. They were scheduled to start a three-game series that night with the New York Yankees.

But later that morning, the world as we knew it would change forever.

Kip Wells called me and said, Turn on the TV, the World Trade Center is getting bombed, Mark Buehrle said. I went to the TV to see what was going on, turned it on, and there it was.

A few doors down, a similar phone call went to Ed Cassin, the White Sox traveling secretary.

I picked up the phone, and it was my wife, Cassin recalled. She said, Are you okay? Im like, Why wouldnt I be okay? Whats going on? She told me to turn on the television. I asked, What channel? She said, It doesnt matter.

Yankees catcher Jorge Posada was in a New York City hospital that Sept. 11th morning, at the bedside of his young son who had just had surgery.

He wanted to watch a videotape, and while Im rewinding it, I see the first plane going into the building, Posada said. I didnt think anything. I just thought it was something made up, some kind of show. But then I see the second plane go into the second building, and then Im like, Hold on a second, somethings going on here. So I go outside to tell the nurse just in case people were coming in, and what to do about all the lines if they needed extra tables or extra beds. Posada paused. But nobody came in.

Back at the White Sox hotel, which was about four miles from the World Trade Center, Paul Konerko said he woke up to panic on the street, alarms at the hotel. He and teammates Sean Lowe, Keith Foulke, and Bob Howry gathered in the lobby. With glazed looks on their faces, they went outside and noticed the exact same expression on everyone else.

Anybody whos been to New York, normally people are walking the streets doing their own thing, but there were really millions of people all thinking about the same thing at one time, it was a very odd feeling, explained Konerko.

From one captain to another, Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter shared Konerkos point of view.

It was surreal to see Manhattan with no cars, no traffic, just people walking in the middle of the street not saying too much, almost something that was out of a movie set, you know? Jeter said. Anyone whos spent time in Manhattan knows how busy it is, all the noise. But it was a ghost town.

Hearing that several planes were unaccounted for, and realizing that they were very close to the Empire State Building, a possible target, Konerko and his three teammates concluded that the safest place to be was actually where it had been the most dangerous.

To me, it just sounded smart to go to where the terrorists already hit, because then youre away from everything else. So we walked down to the World Trade Center, as far as we could, enough to where we could get close and see debris and smoke, Konerko said. Youre still thinking that something could happen again. At that moment, there was still talk that it could.

The fear that engulfed Manhattan was overwhelming, certainly for the 21-year-old Buehrle, in his second season with the White Sox, who was in New York City for the very first time.

I remember walking back to my hotel room and just looking over my back thinking that somebodys going to jump out of a door and kill me or come attack us thinking that terrorists were staying at our hotel, Buehrle said.I mean there was a lot of stuff going through your mind.

With the series against the Yankees cancelled, and all surrounding airports closed, Ken Williams, in his first season as White Sox general manager, called Ed Cassin and gave him a single directive.

I dont care what you do, get us out of town.

Over the next several hours, Cassins ear would remain glued to his cell phone as he attempted to get the White Sox back to Chicago, and doing it from the city of our countrys greatest single-day tragedy since Japan bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941.

I called Major League Baseball and their security agents, who put me in contact with the Port Authority police, the New York state police, the New York City police, because they had basically stopped all traffic coming into Manhattan, Cassin explained. So our plan was to try to get a couple buses off Manhattan the next day and we had to have approvals from all authorities. It took a lot of phone calls. Obviously, they were quite busy dealing with the situation to worry about the Chicago White Sox. We were probably the last thing on their minds.

Thanks to Cassins relentless determination, two buses arrived at the White Sox hotel at 7:00 a.m. the next morning. Amidst the chaos and extreme devastation in lower Manhattan, the White Sox found a way back home.

It was an eerie, eerie ride, Hawk Harrelson remembered. Everybody was very quiet. And I was just looking out the window and looking up at the sky and I never saw one plane. Not one plane the whole trip from New York to Chicago because they had canceled all the flights, not even a military plane did I see.

It was the shortest and most relaxing 15 or 20 hour bus ride I ever had in my life, Buehrle said. I just remember driving through the country and seeing trees and I think that was the first moment in a day and a half where you could breathe and say, Im finally safe.

Six days after the attacks, with emotions still raw, the grieving process just beginning, baseball returned to a dark and solemn America. The following day on Sept. 18th, the White Sox and Yankees coincidentally resumed play at U.S. Cellular Field. It was Chicagos first sporting event since 911, and a passionate crowd opened its hearts, not just for the White Sox, but even the visiting Yankees, whose city was still reeling from the terrorist attacks.

Its a memory that remains with the Yankees now 10 years later.

There was a big sign in right field that said Chicago loves New York. I will never forget that, Posada said. I think it was just a very, very exciting time for people to see baseball again.

It seemed like even people that hated the Yankees were almost pulling for New York so to speak, Jeter explained. Im sure there were fans who wanted us to lose, but it seemed like there were a lot less boos and a lot less hatred towards our team at that point.

When the White Sox returned to New York City in October to play the postponed games with the Yankees, a policeman at Yankee Stadium who was a friend of Hawk Harrelsons, took the White Sox play-by-play announcer for a visit to Ground Zero.

Clearing his throat, an emotional Harrelson recalled seeing a canine unit coming back from an unsuccessful mission at the site.

The dogs had their tails between their legs with their heads down, just walking. Someone came over to us and said, These dogs are taking it as hard as we are because theyre trained to find life, and they cant find it.
"There was a big sign in right field that said 'Chicago loves New York.' I will never forget that.-- Yankees catcher Jorge Posada
Harrelson brought a small bag with him to collect some of the debris from Ground Zero. His policeman friend said to him, Do you know what youre putting in there?

Harrelsons eyes well up.

Thats vaporized concrete, vaporized steel, and vaporized bodies.

A few weeks later, Harrelson shared some of the debris with his good friend, golfer Arnold Palmer.

I said, Arnold I want you to have this. And I put it in his hand, and he started crying. It was the most devastating thing that your mind could ever imagine, and its just a shame that so quickly so many people have forgotten it, Harrelson said.

That might not be the case in New York City, Washington, DC, and Shanksville, Pennsylvania, the sites of the terrorist attacks, where the emotional toll can still be felt, unspeakable pain that might never go away. However, with Sept. 11th now 10 years in the rearview mirror, it is important to remember the feeling of that day and how we bonded together as a country in the days that followed. While parts of America have likely moved on from 911, burying the memories of that frightful time, Harrelson has chosen to keep the tragedy close to his heart.

He feels like hes in the minority.

I have never loved this country more than I do right now, never. I didnt like it so much after the Vietnam War, but its changed me. Its changed my whole family, Harrelson said. I just hope people remember. They say that they do, but its bull----. They dont.

Sunday marks the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11th. The White Sox will host the Indians in Chicago, the Yankees will be in Anaheim to play the Angels. But most will have their hearts and minds in New York City, the place where the world changed, the same with all of our lives.

I think the one thing that you appreciate is you appreciate the freedom we have in our country, Jeter said. It was an unfortunate event, but it opened a lot of eyes.

Baseball for me is not everything. Family comes first, added Posada.

Obviously, being there and seeing it, its one of those things where I dont take life for granted, Buehrle explained. Thats why I go out there and have as much fun as I can no matter what Im doing. Even baseball can come to an end, so just never take life for granted.

Chuck Garfien hosts White Sox Pregame and Postgame Live on Comcast SportsNet with former Sox slugger Bill Melton. Follow Chuck @ChuckGarfien on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox news and views.

Volstad, Santiago show capability as rotation alternatives, but White Sox still have starting-pitching mystery this weekend

0424-chris-volstad.jpg
USA TODAY

Volstad, Santiago show capability as rotation alternatives, but White Sox still have starting-pitching mystery this weekend

Chris Volstad and Hector Santiago combined for one of the best outings by a White Sox starting pitcher this season.

These weren’t the names anyone expected to fit that description when the season began. But with struggles all around from James Shields, Lucas Giolito, Miguel Gonzalez and Carson Fulmer, here the White Sox sit as they approach the one-month mark of the 2018 campaign.

Reynaldo Lopez has been excellent, no doubt about it, and Fulmer has turned in a couple nice outings, including in Monday’s win over the visiting Seattle Mariners. But against that same M’s lineup Tuesday afternoon, Volstad — who lasted 4.1 innings in a 1-0 loss — became the first White Sox starter this season not to issue a walk.

It was an important outing for Volstad, as well as for Santiago, who followed him up with 3.1 shutout innings of his own. The duo showed they’re both capable of serving as reliable fill-ins in a White Sox rotation that got a hole punched in it Monday, when Gonzalez went to the disabled list.

Shields, Giolito, Lopez, Fulmer. Those guys aren’t going anywhere. But should Gonzalez remain on the DL for an extended period of time, it doesn’t seem as if the White Sox need to be searching for options.

“Volstad and Hector both did a nice job. I thought they gave us plenty of outs, they gave us plenty of opportunity,” manager Rick Renteria said after Tuesday’s game.

But that doesn’t mean the South Siders are out of the starting-pitching woods for the remainder of this week. Shields will go in Wednesday’s finale with the Mariners. Giolito and Lopez are set to pitch in the first two games of a five-game road series against the Kansas City Royals on Thursday and Friday, respectively.

But Saturday presents a mystery, one that doesn’t seem to have an easy answer.

Thanks to that opening-weekend snow-out, there’s a doubleheader Saturday, and while Fulmer is in line to start one of those games, who will start the other? The White Sox will get a 26th man for that day, and that spot is typically given to a spot starter brought up from Triple-A. But given the White Sox current situation on the 40-man roster, there aren’t many options, meaning a player might need to be outrighted in order to make room for a spot starter.

Let’s get this out of the way first: It seems unlikely that Michael Kopech will make his major league debut in a spot start during an April doubleheader in Kansas City. Yes, Kopech has been good in his three starts with Charlotte, sporting a 2.40 ERA with 21 strikeouts. But he’s got just six total starts at the Triple-A level, and the White Sox have made it abundantly clear throughout the last several months that the necessities of the big league team during this rebuilding season and Kopech’s readiness for the majors are independent of one another.

It makes no sense to potentially cut short Kopech’s development at the Triple-A level because the big league rotation needs a spot starter.

The options, however, are limited.

Of the seven players who have started games for the Knights this season, two are on the big league roster right now (Volstad and Chris Beck), one is Kopech and one has a 9.75 ERA (T.J. House). One is on the 40-man roster, Ricardo Pinto, who made his first start at Charlotte on Tuesday. Pinto, though, would be on short rest Saturday.

The other two are Dylan Covey, who turned in a 7.71 ERA with the White Sox last season, and Donn Roach, who has made two career major league starts, most recently giving up four runs in 3.1 innings in a spot start for the Cubs in 2015. Covey and Roach have 2.95 and 1.88 ERAs at Charlotte, respectively. But the White Sox would need to make room on the 40-man roster to bring either up, even just for a day.

While it would be on “short rest,” perhaps the most logical option is just to start Volstad or Santiago on Saturday and start the other on Sunday. Tuesday, Volstad threw 66 pitches and Santiago threw 59 pitches, neither total approaching the qualification of a heavy workload, especially considering both veterans have plenty of starting experience under their belts.

Renteria talked about how well it worked using both guys in tandem Tuesday, but he might have to split them up to staff his rotation this weekend. It would also eliminate the need to remove someone from the 40-man roster. The White Sox could just bring up another bullpen arm as the 26th man, someone like Juan Minaya, who was on the Opening Day roster.

Renteria has already shown willingness to use his pitchers outside of the traditional “every fifth day” strategy. Shields and Fulmer both pitched in back-to-back games just last week. And Fulmer’s turn was moved up when Gonzalez went on the DL, pressing him into his third appearance in six days Monday.

The mystery likely won’t be solved, at least publicly, anytime soon. We’ll likely have to wait a few days to know for sure. Until then, it’s a guessing game.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Trayce Thompson - 'This is home'

trayce_thompson.jpg
USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Trayce Thompson - 'This is home'

Drafted by the White Sox in 2009, Trayce Thompson never wanted to play for another team but the White Sox. 

All that changed in 2015 when he was dealt to the Dodgers in the Todd Frazier trade. Now back with the White Sox, Thompson talks with Chuck Garfien about the trials and tribulations of the last few years, the whirlwind of being on 4 teams in the last 4 weeks, how the White Sox threw him a lifeline bringing him back, how he wants to make the best of this new opportunity and more. 

Take a listen here or in the embedded player below.