White Sox

White Sox gearing up for offseason hitters minicamp

White Sox gearing up for offseason hitters minicamp

Next week’s hitters minicamp will afford White Sox prospects and the franchise’s player development staff a chance to get accustomed to each other.

Newly acquired prospect Yoan Moncada and 2016 first-round pick Zack Collins are among the 15 White Sox minor leaguers set to attend the three-day camp, which begins Monday at Camelback Ranch in Glendale, Ariz.

New player development director Chris Getz and first-year hitting coordinator Mike Gellinger will facilitate the event along with White Sox hitting coach Todd Steverson. Getz said he’s eager to get a wide-ranging group of players together roughly 5.5 weeks before the team’s first full-squad spring training workout (Feb. 18).

“There’s a lot of benefit,” Getz said. “Just to get acquainted.

“It’s good to get them all together.”

The session gives the White Sox their first close look at Moncada, who MLB.com has rated as the No. 1 overall prospect in baseball. The infielder was acquired from the Boston Red Sox last month as part of a four-player package in exchange for Chris Sale.

“It’ll be nice to have him out there,” Getz said. “He can hit. He has power. The upside is impressive.”

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Also scheduled to attend the camp are Alex Call and Jameson Fisher, the team’s third- and fourth-round picks in 2016. Kevan Smith, Jason Coates and Charlie Tilson are also set to appear. Tilson, who had surgery last August after he tore his left hamstring, has made enough progress in his road back to health to participate.

“He’s had fairly positive signs in his rehab,” Getz said. “He’s trending in the right direction.”

The same goes for third baseman Matt Davidson, who has worked his way back after he broke a bone in his foot last June.

Though spring training is right around the corner, Getz said January is normally the time when hitters “establish their solid habits.”

Ideally, the White Sox would love for a group of their prospects to form a bond in the minors and learn how to win together before they reach the majors. Getz spent the past two seasons in Kansas City and also played alongside a core that developed together and later helped the Royals reach the World Series in 2014 and 2015, winning the latter. He’s aware of the benefit of that chemistry but knows it doesn’t always work that way.

“We’ve got some guys a little further down the line,” Getz said. “It’s definitely valuable to get them to grow up together. But at the same time, we have to remember they’re individuals at different stages and on different paces.”

A member of the organization since he was a minor leaguer, Gellinger is in a different role, taking over as the hitting coordinator for Vance Law, who moves to infield coordinator.

“It’ll be good for him to get together with the other coaches,” Getz said.

White Sox Talk Podcast: 'Searching for a safe space in Cubslandia'

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: 'Searching for a safe space in Cubslandia'

With the Cubs back in the NLCS, White Sox fans have had to deal with another post-season of Cubs this and Cubs that. How does one escape it? Diehard White Sox fan John Kass of the Chicago Tribune comes on the podcast to talk with Chuck Garfien about his recent column entitled "Searching for a safe space in Cubslandia." Kass talks about how he's dealing with the Cubs success and how White Sox fans can find this safe space. He tells the story about taking the White Sox World Series trophy into a Chicago Tribune board meeting in 2005 to rub it in the faces of the Trib's executives who were all Cubs fans.  

Kass talks about how he watches the Cubs in the playoffs, the Chicago media coverage of their playoff run and how Cubs fans will react if they don't repeat as champions. Garfien and Kass also discuss the White Sox rebuild, the Cubs losing in 2003 and why Kass will be calling Cubs Pre and Post host David Kaplan in the middle of the night if and when the Cubs are eliminated.  

White Sox mourn passing of former pitcher Daniel Webb

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USA TODAY

White Sox mourn passing of former pitcher Daniel Webb

Former White Sox pitcher Daniel Webb died at the age of 28 in an ATV accident on Saturday night, according to Humphreys County Sheriff Chris Davis.

Davis called it a “tragic accident, and we should rally around the family.”

Webb, a Paducah, Ky. native, was with the White Sox from 2013-16 and went 7-5 with a 4.50 ERA.

The White Sox released this statement:

Daniel left many friends within the Chicago White Sox organization, and we are all shocked and stunned by the news of last night's terrible accident. He was a terrific young man with a full life ahead of him. All thoughts and prayers go to his family and friends as they deal with today's tragic news.