White Sox

White Sox winter meetings recap

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White Sox winter meetings recap

This week's winter meetings in Dallas produced two key stories for the White Sox. One was expected, the other was not.

In a pre-meetings poll, 54 percent of readers thought Carlos Quentin was the most likely White Sox player to be dealt during the week. Only four percent of responders voted for "someone else." That "someone else" wound up being Sergio Santos, who was traded to Toronto on Tuesday for minor league pitcher Nestor Molina. The move signaled the beginning of a rebuilding process, although that process wasn't furthered during the week with trades of Quentin, John Danks or Gavin Floyd.

On Wednesday, the expected happened, with Mark Buehrle signing a four-year, 58 million deal with the Miami Marlins. CSNChicago's Chuck Garfien, who had reported all week Miami was the frontrunner to sign Buehrle, said farewell to the longtime Sox pitcher, while Bill Melton weighed in with his thoughts.

There were two other newsworthy bits of White Sox news from the week. First, Minnie Minoso was not inducted into the Hall of Fame, a decision that "stunned" Jerry Reinsdorf. And second, the Minnesota Twins selected White Sox minor league pitcher Terry Doyle in Thursday's Rule 5 Draft.

For full daily recaps of all the rumors and analysis from the winter meetings, check out White Sox Talk's Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday rundowns.

So, what's next for the White Sox? Do they stand pat? Or will Quentin, Danks, Floyd or someone else ultimately be traded?

Potential first-ballot guy and Blackout Game hero Jim Thome headlines group of former White Sox on this year's Hall of Fame ballot

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AP

Potential first-ballot guy and Blackout Game hero Jim Thome headlines group of former White Sox on this year's Hall of Fame ballot

White Sox fans have seen a couple of their team's all-time greats go into the Hall of Fame in recent years, with Frank Thomas inducted in 2014 and Tim Raines inducted earlier this year.

Seven former White Sox are on this year's Hall of Fame ballot, even if only a couple of them made a big impact on the South Side.

Jim Thome is on the ballot for the first time. While more famously a member of those great Cleveland Indians teams of the 1990s, Thome spent four seasons in a White Sox uniform, playing in 529 games and belting 134 of his 612 career home runs with the South Siders.

A Peoria native currently working as a member of the organization, Thome was a beloved part of four White Sox teams, including the last one to reach the postseason in 2008. He smacked a solo homer to drive in the lone run in the legendary Blackout Game, a 1-0 win over the Minnesota Twins that gave the White Sox the American League Central crown in the 163rd game of the 2008 regular season.

Thome ranks second in White Sox history in slugging percentage and OPS, trailing only Thomas in both categories. He's No. 7 on the franchise leaderboard in on-base percentage and No. 13 on the home run list.

Given that he ranks eighth on baseball's all-time home run list, Thome could very well be a first-ballot Hall of Famer.

Also on this year's ballot is Carlos Lee, a power-hitting outfielder who spent the first six seasons of his major league career with the White Sox. El Caballo hit 152 homers and drove in 552 runs in 880 games with the White Sox, finishing 18th in AL MVP voting in 2003 after he slashed .291/.331/.499 with 31 homers. His numbers were even better in 2004, his final season with the White Sox.

Lee ranks ninth on the team's all-time home run list and 11th on the franchise leaderboard in slugging percentage.

Lee did an awful lot of damage in six seasons with the Houston Astros, as well, and earned three All-Star nods in his post-Sox career.

Five others to play for the White Sox are on this year's ballot. Sammy Sosa, more noteworthy for what he did with the Cubs, spent parts of three seasons on the South Side. Omar Vizquel, another Indians great like Thome, played for the White Sox in 2010 and 2011. Andruw Jones, better known for his defensive highlights with the Atlanta Braves, played 107 games with the White Sox in 2010. Orlando Hudson played in 51 games for the White Sox in 2012. And Manny Ramirez, the legendary Indians and Red Sox slugger, played 24 games with the White Sox in 2010.

In order to qualify for election into the Hall of Fame, a player must appear on 75 of ballots submitted by voters.

Omar Vizquel will reportedly be a minor league manager for White Sox in 2018

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AP

Omar Vizquel will reportedly be a minor league manager for White Sox in 2018

Former White Sox shortstop Omar Vizquel is reportedly about to become current White Sox minor league manager Omar Vizquel.

According to a Sunday report, Vizquel will be the manager of the Winston-Salem Dash in 2018.

Vizquel spent 24 seasons in the big leagues, most of those with the Seattle Mariners, Cleveland Indians and San Francisco Giants. But two of his final four seasons, 2010 and 2011, came on the South Side, where he appeared in 166 games over those two campaigns.

Vizquel is considered one of baseball's all-time great defenders and has 11 Gold Gloves to back that up. He batted .272 with a .336 on-base percentage over a nearly quarter-century major league career that saw him play in four different decades with six different big league teams.

Vizquel has spent the past five seasons as a major league coach. He was an infield coach with the Los Angeles Angels in 2013, and he was a common sight for White Sox fans during his four-year stint as the Detroit Tigers' first-base coach.

Vizquel also interviewed this offseason for the Tigers' open managerial position that eventually went to former Minnesota Twins manager Ron Gardenhire. Vizquel was not retained by the Tigers to be a part of Gardenhire's new coaching staff.

Vizquel managed the Venezuelan team in this year's World Baseball Classic. His team advanced to the second round of the competition, losing all three games in that round.

Last season, Winston-Salem was a focal point for those watching the White Sox bevy of highly ranked prospects develop in the minor leagues. Another former White Sox player, Willie Harris, was the manager at Winston-Salem last season.