White Sox

Why White Sox decided now is right time to shut down Lucas Giolito's season

Why White Sox decided now is right time to shut down Lucas Giolito's season

Lucas Giolito’s next start won’t occur until spring training 2018.

The White Sox announced Tuesday plans to shut down their rookie pitcher for the season after he reached an unofficial inning limit. Promoted to the majors last month, Giolito combined to pitch 174 innings between the White Sox and Triple-A Charlotte. Along with an increased output from 136 2/3 innings last season, Giolito has pitched so well the White Sox see no reason to have him make another start. 

“There’s nothing left to prove this year,” pitching coach Don Cooper said. “There’s nothing really to gain. It couldn’t have gone better. I don’t think his first trip to the big leagues with us could have went any better. He’s got his blueprint. You look at all of the games, just about every one of them have been really good.”

The club also announced that James Shields has made his last start of 2017. Shields is set to have PRP shots to combat tendonitis in both knees.

Giolito hoped to face the Cleveland Indians on Friday night. He looked forward to the challenge of facing the winningest American League team and said the news is a little bittersweet, though he totally understands why.

But he’s also very pleased with a season in which he’s experienced it all. Giolito struggled at the outset and lost his lofty status as the top pitching prospect in baseball. Somewhere along the way, however, Giolito rediscovered his confidence and soared. He went 3-3 with a 2.38 ERA in seven starts with the White Sox and finished the season with a combined 168 strikeouts. Giolito also recorded a seven-inning no-hitter at Triple-A Charlotte.

“This was such a crazy year,” Giolito said. “I started not the way I wanted to. I had to kind of get over some trials and tribulations down in the minor leagues trying to fix some things, trying to find myself and see who I was as a pitcher. To get the opportunity up here in late August, I knew that it’s a special opportunity so I wanted to take it and run with it and I’m glad I was able to put together some good starts for the club.

“It’s understandable that 175 they wanted to cap me off. When they first told me, it was kind of like bittersweet. I wanted to take the ball against the Indians. I want to pitch against the best.

“But at the same time, I completely understand the process of everything. I’m pleased with where I’m at.”

The White Sox are very satisfied to see how Giolito has developed in his first season after coming over from the Washington Nationals in the Adam Eaton deal. They see the confidence he’s gained and Cooper is pleased to see Giolito taking advantage of his 6-foot-6 frame and confusing hitters by throwing from a higher angle. Manager Rick Renteria thinks Giolito took some critical steps in 2017 and has set himself up well to have success next season.

“He’s done a fantastic job,” Renteria said. “There’s no reason for us to continue to push him beyond where he’s at. He’s on pace hopefully for us to maybe reach the 200-inning marker next year.

“Right now, he’s in a good place.”

Shields ended his season in the most consistent place he’s been in with the White Sox in some time. The right-hander adjusted to throwing from a three-quarters angle midway through an Aug. 5 start. In nine turns since, Shields posted a 4.31 ERA and struck out 53 batters in 54 1/3 innings.

The White Sox haven't announced who will start in Giolito's place on Friday. Chris Volstad is expected to go in the season finale on Sunday instead of Shields.

White Sox Talk Podcast: 'Searching for a safe space in Cubslandia'

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: 'Searching for a safe space in Cubslandia'

With the Cubs back in the NLCS, White Sox fans have had to deal with another post-season of Cubs this and Cubs that. How does one escape it? Diehard White Sox fan John Kass of the Chicago Tribune comes on the podcast to talk with Chuck Garfien about his recent column entitled "Searching for a safe space in Cubslandia." Kass talks about how he's dealing with the Cubs success and how White Sox fans can find this safe space. He tells the story about taking the White Sox World Series trophy into a Chicago Tribune board meeting in 2005 to rub it in the faces of the Trib's executives who were all Cubs fans.  

Kass talks about how he watches the Cubs in the playoffs, the Chicago media coverage of their playoff run and how Cubs fans will react if they don't repeat as champions. Garfien and Kass also discuss the White Sox rebuild, the Cubs losing in 2003 and why Kass will be calling Cubs Pre and Post host David Kaplan in the middle of the night if and when the Cubs are eliminated.  

White Sox mourn passing of former pitcher Daniel Webb

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USA TODAY

White Sox mourn passing of former pitcher Daniel Webb

Former White Sox pitcher Daniel Webb died at the age of 28 in an ATV accident on Saturday night, according to Humphreys County Sheriff Chris Davis.

Davis called it a “tragic accident, and we should rally around the family.”

Webb, a Paducah, Ky. native, was with the White Sox from 2013-16 and went 7-5 with a 4.50 ERA.

The White Sox released this statement:

Daniel left many friends within the Chicago White Sox organization, and we are all shocked and stunned by the news of last night's terrible accident. He was a terrific young man with a full life ahead of him. All thoughts and prayers go to his family and friends as they deal with today's tragic news.