Nicky Delmonico

Eighteen White Sox questions for 2018: Where does Nicky Delmonico fit in the long-term picture?


Eighteen White Sox questions for 2018: Where does Nicky Delmonico fit in the long-term picture?

White Sox fans might have their eyes on the future, but the 2018 season has plenty of intrigue all its own. As Opening Day nears, let's take a look at the 18 most pressing questions for the 2018 edition of the South Side baseball team.

The plan did not include Nicky Delmonico, you'd have to imagine.

The White Sox rebuild has seen an incredible infusion of talent into the minor league system, with some of that talent hitting the big leagues last season. And with this collection of highly touted prospects have come the projections, figuring out who goes where on the diamond when the rebuild finally reaches its apex and the White Sox are planned to be a perennial contender. It's easy to plug guys like Yoan Moncada and Eloy Jimenez and Luis Robert and Michael Kopech into those spots, and by simply following along with the prospect rankings, it's not at all difficult to map out projected lineups for the foreseeable future.

This time last year, those projections would not have included Delmonico. But they might now.

Delmonico doesn't carry the same top-prospect pedigree as many of his current and future teammates, but he made quite the impression in his handful of big league games at the end of the 2017 campaign, earning himself a fan club and consideration to be a long-term piece for this team. In 2018, Delmonico will join many of his fellow White Sox in trying to prove he belongs.

Delmonico played in 43 major league games last season, posting a .262/.373/.482 slash line with nine homers, 25 runs scored and 23 RBIs. Now that's a small sample size, but it's reason to get a little excited. Extrapolate those numbers out to a full season, and you could be talking about a 30-homer campaign with more than 80 RBIs — and more than 80 walks, an important stat considering some of the team's other young players count reaching base via the walk as a big weakness.

Again, there's no guarantee that those kinds of numbers will come in 2018, but Delmonico figures to be given every opportunity. He'll likely be the everyday left fielder at the season's outset, and his versatility allows him to play elsewhere on the field, too.

Delmonico also has a big personality and big expectations, and he seems to have emerged as a strong clubhouse presence on this young team.

But the White Sox outfield of the future looks to be a crowded one. Jimenez and Robert, two of the top 30 prospects in baseball, would figure to have future spots on lock, even if they're still more than a year away from reaching the majors. Micker Adolfo has high hopes — and was part of the same buzz-worthy batting-practice group as Jimenez and Robert during the early days of spring training — but he's dealing with a potentially significant elbow injury that could delay his arrival on the South Side. Then there's the virtually undiscussed Blake Rutherford, who MLB Pipeline still ranks as one of the game's top 100 prospects.

But as Rick Hahn is frequent to remind, these rebuilding efforts never see everything go exactly according to plan. That could mean in a negative way, such as the injuries to guys like Adolfo and Jake Burger or the fact that it's simply unrealistic to expect each and every one of these prospects to become big league superstars. But it can also mean in a positive way, such as surprises like Delmonico. Just because a guy isn't ranked as one of the game's top prospects doesn't mean he can't still turn into an everyday big leaguer. Delmonico will try to prove that this season, prove that August and September last year were no fluke.

And he won't be alone. 2018 is setting up to be a "prove it" year for guys like Yolmer Sanchez, Carson Fulmer and even guys like Tim Anderson and Avisail Garcia as the wave of prospects comes increasingly closer to the South Side. The guys there now need to show they're just as much a part of this rebuilding effort, too. Just like it's a developmental season in the minors for the prospects, it's a developmental season in the majors, too. And Delmonico is one of the guys hoping to develop into a no-brainer long-term piece.

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As Cactus League play begins, how many spots are actually up for grabs on the White Sox roster?


As Cactus League play begins, how many spots are actually up for grabs on the White Sox roster?

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Some teams have it easy, with their 25-man rosters seemingly locked into place before spring training games even start.

The White Sox actually have a lot more locked-down spots than you might think for a rebuilding team, but this spring remains pretty important for a few guys.

The starting rotation figures to be set, with James Shields, Lucas Giolito, Reynaldo Lopez, Miguel Gonzalez and Carson Fulmer the starting five. Carlos Rodon, of course, owns one of those spots once he returns from injury. But the date of that return remains a mystery.

From this observer’s viewpoint, eight of the everyday nine position players seem to be figured out, too: Welington Castillo behind the plate, Jose Abreu at first base, Yoan Moncada at second base, Tim Anderson at shortstop, Yolmer Sanchez at third base, Nicky Delmonico in left field, Avisail Garcia in right field and Matt Davidson as the designated hitter. More on the omission of a starting center fielder in a bit.

Omar Narvaez would be a logical pick to back up Castillo at catcher, and Tyler Saladino is really the lone reserve infielder with big league experience, not to mention he’s a versatile player that can play anywhere on the infield.

Leury Garcia also figures to be a lock for this 25-man roster. But will he be the everyday center fielder, as he was for a spell last season? He played 51 games in center in 2017 but battled injuries throughout the year. I think Leury Garcia will end up the starting center fielder when the season begins because of his bat. His .270/.316/.423 slash line isn’t going to make anyone do cartwheels, but it’s better than the offensive struggles of Adam Engel, who started 91 games in center in 2017 and slashed .166/.235/.282. Engel would still be a solid inclusion on the bench because of his superb defense, but to create that big a hole in the everyday lineup is tough.

How could that position-player group change? Keep your eyes in center field, where there are a couple other guys who could force their way into a roster spot this spring: Charlie Tilson and Ryan Cordell. Tilson has had a tremendous amount of trouble staying on the field since coming over to the White Sox in a 2016 deadline deal, but that hasn’t dampened the White Sox hopes for him. And Cordell got name-dropped by general manager Rick Hahn during SoxFest, when the GM said he’s received multiple calls about Cordell since acquiring him last summer. Cordell put up good numbers at the Triple-A level prior to a significant injury last year.

But the main battles figure to be in the bullpen. At times this winter, as the White Sox kept adding players to that relief corps mix, that the whole thing seemed wide open. But when you think about it, maybe there are only one or two open spots.

You’d have to think these guys are pretty safe bets to make the team: Juan Minaya, Gregory Infante, Nate Jones, Joakim Soria and Luis Avilan. Though Hector Santiago was just recently acquired on a minor league deal, he’s really the only long man of the group, and he could sub in if there’s an injury to a starting pitcher. That leaves two spots between the group of Aaron Bummer, Danny Farquhar, Jace Fry, Jose Ruiz and Thyago Vieira — not to mention guys signed to minor league deals like Xavier Cedeno, Jeanmar Gomez and Bruce Rondon.

Bummer had a 4.50 ERA in 30 big league games last year. Farquhar had a 4.40 ERA in 15 games. Vieira has gotten attention as a flame-thrower, but he’s got just one big league game under his belt, something that might or might not matter to the rebuilding White Sox. Guys like Gomez, who has 40 career saves including 37 just two years ago, and Rondon, who had multiple shots at the Detroit Tigers’ closing job in the past, could vault themselves into the mix as potential midseason trade candidates.

Then there's the question of which of those guys will be Rick Renteria's closer. Minaya had closing duties after most of the bullpen was traded away last summer. He picked up nine saves and posted a 4.11 ERA in his final 17 appearances of the campaign. Look to Soria, though, a veteran with plenty of closing experience from his days with the Kansas City Royals. If he's given the opportunity to close and succeeds, he could fetch an intriguing return package in a potential deadline deal.

But now it's game time in Arizona.

“The fun part of playing the game of baseball is playing the game of baseball," Renteria said earlier this week. "We prepare. I think they all enjoy what they’re doing in terms of their preparation. They take it seriously, they focus. But ultimately like everything that we do in life, I guess it’s a test. And the games are a test for us on a daily basis. And how we are able to evaluate them and take advantage of the opportunities that we have to see them in a real game situation is certainly helpful for us.”

Why you can believe in the White Sox in 2018


Why you can believe in the White Sox in 2018

Mark it down.

Jan. 28, 2018.

The day Nicky Delmonico planted the White Sox flag for the upcoming season, saying on the White Sox Talk Podcast, “We’re going to surprise the world.”

Surprise the world? What do you mean?

“We’re going to surprise everybody. That’s exactly what I mean,” Delmonico said emphatically. “I think that White Sox fans know it. I think we’re going to have a really exciting year.”

It’s the offseason, a time when every player on every team can basically say the same thing without much accountability. Who’s going to go back and check the quotes in eight months, anyway?

For this story, the hope is, we will have to dig them up at the end of September, because there might actually be some weight behind what Delmonico is saying.  

The White Sox are not going to win the World Series. They’re definitely a long shot to make the playoffs — though Dan Plesac of MLB Network was the first prominent believer in the White Sox, saying at the Winter Meetings that they could compete for a wild card.

For the record, Plesac grew up a White Sox fan. So did I.

But dig deeper into the White Sox 67-95 record last season, and there was a lot more going on than mere wins and losses.

Take last July and August. The White Sox were terrible. They traded away Jose Quintana, David Robertson, Tommy Kahnle, Todd Frazier, Anthony Swarzak, Melky Cabrera and Dan Jennings. They went a combined 17-34 in those two months. On Aug. 31, they were serious contenders for the worst record in baseball and the first pick in this year’s draft.

But when the dust settled in September, what happened?

The White Sox got better.

They went 15-14 and had their best month since April.

Truth be told, September can be a weird month. There are call-ups getting their first (and sometimes last) taste in the majors. Plus, there are contending teams resting players, which allows also-rans like the White Sox to pick up some cheap wins. So September success can sometimes be fool’s gold.

But manager Rick Renteria saw something different going on with his team that month.

“I think that our players who were with us through September learned a little bit about themselves,” Renteria said during last weekend's SoxFest festivities. “If everybody starts to really look at it, Tim Anderson started to rebound from some of the things he was going through at the time. (Yoan) Moncada started squaring up more pitches in the off-speed category that he was probably swinging through when he first arrived. Those were some of the adjustments we were hoping he was going to make.”

After slashing .105/.261/.263 in his first 12 games in July, Moncada rebounded with .276/.349/.469 and five HRs in September. As for Anderson, he closed the season with his hair on fire. He batted .327 with nine stolen bases in September. He also had 32 strikeouts and just one walk, but hey, you can’t have everything.

“I saw (the players) starting to come together (in September) and understand a lot of their particular roles, specifically the bullpen,” Renteria said.

Let’s get to that bullpen, which was a shambles after the trade deadline. They finished August with a 6.03 ERA, the worst in baseball. But come September, the rocky seas got a whole lot calmer. As a team, the bullpen had a 3.96 ERA that month, not great, but they finished in the middle of the pack in the majors. Look at things a little closer and you had left-handed rookie Aaron Bummer settle down and finish with an 0.96 ERA in September. Gregory Infante had his second straight sub-2.00 ERA month in a row (1.42). Juan Minaya closed the season with five scoreless innings and five consecutive saves.

In the starting rotation, Derek Holland and his 6.20 ERA were DFA’d on Sept. 5.

Mike Pelfrey was still used occasionally as a starter in September — with disastrous results, 17 runs in two starts — adding to the White Sox loss total. Both won’t be in the rotation in 2018.

But three pitchers who very likely will be on this year's starting staff were called up to the majors and did this in September:

— Carson Fulmer: 3-0, 1.64 ERA
— Lucas Giolito: 2-2, 2.23 ERA
— Reynaldo Lopez: 3-2, 4.10 ERA

This season, they’ll be mainly throwing to Welington Castillo, a big upgrade at the catching position from last season offensively and defensively. Castillo had a league-leading 44.4-percent caught-stealing rate in 2017. White Sox catchers were second-to-last at 18 percent. Castillo had the best pitch-framing statistics of his career. He also hit a career-high 20 home runs in only 365 plate appearances.

And sometime next season (possibly as early as May or June), the White Sox will likely bring up Michael Kopech, who has one of the best arms in minor league baseball. The rotation will be young but potentially really good.

The White Sox are stressing patience with their prospects, but if they can press the issue and check all the boxes, they could be promoted sooner rather than later.

“We have an eye on all of them. Some of the things we’ll talk to them about in spring training is to let them know, ‘Hey, we know you’re here,’” Renteria said. “You’re never too far away. Sometimes you think you’re from here to the moon and all of a sudden (a call up) happens and you’re surprised. We don’t want them to be surprised when they get to the big leagues. We want them to be ready and expect to get to the big leagues.”

Eloy Jimenez has only played 18 games at the Double-A level. He says he wants to make the big league club out of spring training. If that doesn’t happen (and let’s be honest, it won’t), he’ll settle for coming up, as he put it, in “the middle” of the season.

If that occurs, you’ll have two of the best minor league prospects in baseball joining a tenacious, cohesive club that follows the lead of their persistent manager.

“We’re not going to be someone that’s gonna let other clubs just walk all over. We took that approach last year,” Renteria said. “We’re not going to put ourselves in the position where we’re going to downplay where we’re at. We’re going to play to high expectations. That’s a fact.

“We want our guys to have fun. We want our guys to exude to the fans that are coming out every single day to play as consistent of baseball that they possibly can. I think we’re getting to that point where people are starting to trust that as a reality.”

After getting called up on August 1, Delmonico took this mindset and ran with it. He set a White Sox record, reaching base in the first 13 games of his major league career. In September, he hit walk-off home runs against the Minnesota Twins and Los Angeles Angels, two teams chasing a wild card. For a fan base starving for hope and excitement, the charismatic Delmonico quickly became one of the White Sox most popular players.

But beyond the baseball field, he noticed something really special going on inside the clubhouse that he believes will lead to more victories in 2018.

“I haven’t felt this comfortable in a locker room in I don’t know how long,” Delmonico said. “I think it has to do with up top, with everything going on in the front office all the way down to the clubhouse. I think everybody is on the same page. It’s really fun to come in and play for the White Sox everyday. Everyone is on board with what we have to do and what we want to do. The biggest thing is that we’re here to have fun and play hard. I think everybody has bought into those two things. If you do those two things, you play hard and have fun, you can do a lot of damage out on the field.”

After doing most of their dirty work with the rebuild last season, the White Sox are now starting to trend upward. Meanwhile, the Kansas City Royals and Detroit Tigers are just beginning their teardowns. Expect some dark days ahead for those teams — and more wins for the South Siders.

How many more? That’s in the eye of the beholder. If they can stay healthy, an additional 10 to 15 wins seems possible. Delmonico obviously goes much further, predicting the White Sox are going to surprise the world.

Get ready, Earth.

Wherever you sit on the “White Sox in 2018” spectrum, it’s tough to deny the talent that has reached the majors and will continue to arrive in the future.

So go ahead, be a believer in the White Sox — even in 2018. They should be better, and better than most people think.

October baseball seems unlikely. But it’s February. It’s baseball. Anything is possible.