Cubs

John Lackey isn't riding off into the sunset just yet, but is a Cubs reunion in the cards?

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USA TODAY

John Lackey isn't riding off into the sunset just yet, but is a Cubs reunion in the cards?

John Lackey is not riding off into the sunset just yet.

The veteran cowboy/pitcher/haircut-non-getter has always said he wouldn't announce his retirement and just march quietly back to his Texas home with nothing close to a David Ross-esque farewell tour.

Lackey — who just turned 39 last month — is not ready to call it quits, according to Jon Heyman:

Lackey went 12-12 with a 4.59 ERA in 2017, while giving up a league-high 36 homers. But he was hardly the only pitcher directly affected by the home run explosion in baseball in 2017 and he made 30 starts for the ninth time in his career.

It is curious that Lackey's sources have already said he'll be back in 2018 after his good buddy Jon Lester toasted to what was "probably" Lackey's last regular season start in St. Louis in late September:

The day the Cubs were eliminated from playoff contention last month, reporters crowded around Lackey's locker in an effort to interview him before he rode off into the sunset, but he shut that down immediately, waving off the Chicago media.

So if he does return to professional baseball, is a reunion in the cards for the Cubs and Lackey in 2018? 

The Cubs have two openings in their starting rotation and Lackey is a guy that can eat up innings as a quality No. 5 starter — he went 6-2 with a 3.82 ERA, 1.18 WHIP and 8.3 K/9 in his last 12 starts of 2017.

But Lackey's year was also rocky, though that's probably to be expected of a guy who is ridiculously competitive and never hesitates to speak his mind.

He had an issue with Anthony Rizzo in the dugout in late July and was ejected in an epic tirade in mid-September. He also gave up the walk-off homer to Justin Turner in Game 2 of the NLCS and surrendered four runs on five hits and a pair of walks in 3.2 postseason innings as he was relegated to the bullpen.

At this point in his career, a move back to the American League would be at least a little head-scratching and the only two National League teams he's pitched for are the Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals. It would make sense that he would prefer to return to a team, situation and city he's already familiar with, so the Cubs and Lester may have the inside track at retaining Lackey's services if they so choose.

But the Cubs also may want to get some fresh blood in the starting rotation rather than a quick fix that would probably only be for the 2018 campaign.

Kerry Wood and Carlos Zambrano are on this year's Hall of Fame ballot

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AP

Kerry Wood and Carlos Zambrano are on this year's Hall of Fame ballot

Two of the Cubs' greatest starting pitchers are among the 33 names on this year's Hall of Fame ballot.

Kerry Wood and Carlos Zambrano, both longtime fixtures in the North Side starting rotation, landed on the ballot for the first time. Legendary Cubs slugger Sammy Sosa is on the ballot for the sixth year.

Wood accomplished one of baseball's all-time most impressive feats, striking out 20 Houston Astros on May 6, 1998, in just his fifth start in the big leagues. He won the National League Rookie of the Year award in 1998 and was a two-time All Star in his 12 seasons with the Cubs.

Wood was a member of that stellar starting rotation in 2003, helping the Cubs to their first-ever NL Central title with a 3.20 ERA and a baseball-leading 266 strikeouts in 32 starts. Injuries, however, plagued Wood throughout his career with the Cubs, and after making those 32 starts in 2003 and 22 more in 2004, he started just 14 games for the remainder of his career.

Still, Wood is one of the most recognizable and celebrated pitchers in franchise history, No. 3 on the team's all-time strikeout list. Only 13 pitchers have appeared in more games with the Cubs than Wood.

Zambrano was also a part of that 2003 team in his third season in the majors. He spent all but one season of his 12-season big league career with the Cubs, making 282 starts and three All-Star teams. He finished in the top five in NL Cy Young voting three times: in 2004, 2006 and 2007. The 2004 campaign was Zambrano's finest, as he posted a 2.75 ERA in 31 starts for a Cubs team that nearly made a repeat trip to the postseason.

Zambrano had a famously hot temper and earned as many cheers for his on-field antics as he did for his pitching prowess. While some of those memorable blow-ups might resonate with fans a little more in the long run, he's one of the franchise's greatest pitchers ever, No. 2 on the team's all-time strikeout list, behind only Fergie Jenkins, and No. 15 on the wins list. Only seven pitchers have started more games in a Cubs uniform than Zambrano.

Statistically, Sosa seems like a no-brainer for the Hall of Fame, No. 9 on baseball's all-time home runs list with 609 dingers and the only player ever to have three 60-homer seasons. But it has been difficult for him to get votes from the writers. He received just 8.6 percent of votes last season. To be elected to the Hall of Fame, a player needs to appear on 75 percent of ballots.

Two other ex-Cubs, Fred McGriff and Jamie Moyer, are also on this year's ballot.

Watch: Kris Bryant discovers that no one in Austria knows who Kris Bryant is

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RED BULL

Watch: Kris Bryant discovers that no one in Austria knows who Kris Bryant is

Baseball is America's favorite pastime. Not so much for the nations of Europe, however.

Kris Bryant, the Cubs' star third baseman and one of baseball's biggest names, took a trip across the Atlantic for his honeymoon and discovered that he's not quite as famous in the Old World as he is stateside.

Red Bull posted this video of Bryant interviewing locals in Salzburg, Austria, locals who aren't very familiar with baseball — or Bryant.

Bryant and his wife, Jessica, also got to wear lederhosen and visit a castle, getting the full Austrian experience.

So maybe Bryant isn't the most recognizable guy in Austria. If he's ever looking for reaffirmation of his popularity, though, all he has to do is walk the streets of Wrigleyville. Guessing there will be a few more people there who know his name.