Bears

Fantasy baseball middle infield rankings

Fantasy baseball middle infield rankings

By David Ferris
CSNChicago.com

The following players qualify at a middle-infield position (if not multiple positions) in standard Yahoo! leagues. Rankings are based on a 5x5 scoring system (batting average, runs, home runs, RBIs, stolen bases).

1. Robinson Cano, Yankees
2. Ian Kinsler, Rangers
NOTE: Bat perked up in Anaheim series.
3. Jose Reyes, Marlins
NOTE: He's been active on the bases again.
4. Neil Walker, Pirates
NOTE: The unsung hero of this club.
5. Asdrubal Cabrera, Indians
6. Brandon Phillips, Reds
7. Jimmy Rollins, Phillies
8. Jason Kipnis, Indians
9. Emilio Bonifacio, Marlins
NOTE: Has eyes set on stolen-base crown.
10. Allen Craig, Cardinals
NOTE: No clear position, but man what a bat.
11. Elvis Andrus, Rangers
12. Dustin Pedroia, Red Sox
NOTE: Starting to heal up nicely, but might not be 100 percent.
13. Derek Jeter, Yankees
14. Hanley Ramirez, Dodgers
NOTE: A change of scenery at the right time.
15. Ben Zobrist, Rays
16. Danny Espinosa, Nationals
17. Michael Cuddyer, Rockies
NOTE: We expected more in the thin air.
18. Alcides Escobar, Royals
19. Rickie Weeks, Brewers
NOTE: Starting to produce at the expected level.
20. Starlin Castro, Cubs
21. Aaron Hill, Diamondbacks
22. Jose Altuve, Astros
NOTE: The last bat standing in Houston.
23. Josh Rutledge, Rockies
NOTE: Probably slides over to second if and when Tulo returns.
24. Ian Desmond, Nationals
25. Troy Tulowitzki, Rockies
NOTE: There's no need to rush him back.
26. Chase Utley, Phillies
27. Daniel Murphy, Mets
28. Jhonny Peralta, Tigers
29. Dan Uggla, Braves
NOTE: High fly-ball, high-strikeout hitters have extended slumps.
30. Rafael Furcal, Cardinals
31. Kyle Seager, Mariners
32. J.J. Hardy, Orioles
33. Howie Kendrick, Angels
34. Alexei Ramirez, White Sox
NOTE: Won't lose it for you, but not a lot of category punch.
35. Omar Infante, Tigers
36. Kelly Johnson, Blue Jays
NOTE: Production has fallen since the batting slot dropped.
37. Zack Cozart, Reds
38. Jordany Valdespin, Mets
39. Michael Young, Rangers
NOTE: Might be in trouble with Mike Olt around.
40. Trevor Plouffe, Twins
NOTE: It was a fun story before the thumb injury.
41. Alexi Amarista, Padres
42. Brandon Inge, Athletics
43. Dustin Ackley, Mariners
44. Jemile Weeks, Athletics
45. Stephen Drew, Diamondbacks
NOTE: A little passion wouldn't kill him.
46. Gordon Beckham, White Sox
47. Ryan Theriot, Giants
48. Mike Aviles, Red Sox
NOTE: Nicked up, losing time.
49. Darwin Barney, Cubs
50. Yunel Escobar, Blue Jays
51. Erick Aybar, Angels
52. Marco Scutaro, Giants
NOTE: Heady veteran, but stats were mostly Colorado driven.
53. Willie Bloomquist, Diamondbacks
54. Pedro Ciriaco, Red Sox
55. Elliot Johnson, Rays
NOTE: A typical Ray, a story out of nowhere.
56. Dee Gordon, Dodgers
57. Everth Cabrera, Padres
NOTE: Has nifty wheels but stuck in crummy batting slot.
58. Maicer Izturis, Angels
59. Ryan Roberts, Rays
NOTE: Joe Maddon's type of player.
60. Luis Cruz, Dodgers
61. Ruben Tejada, Mets
62. Brian Dozier, Twins
63. Robert Andino, Orioles
64. Jeff Keppinger, Rays
NOTE: Crushes lefties, but that's the short side of any platoon.
65. Andrelton Simmons, Braves
66. Yuniesky Betancourt, Royals
67. Jerry Hairston Jr., Dodgers
68. Mark Ellis, Dodgers
69. Steve Lombardozzi, Nationals
70. Jed Lowrie, Astros
NOTE: Good bat when healthy, but durability the constant concern.
71. Sean Rodriguez, Rays
72. Jamey Carroll, Twins
73. Cody Ransom, Brewers

How a tired Bears defense shut down Cam Newton and dominated the Carolina Panthers

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USA Today

How a tired Bears defense shut down Cam Newton and dominated the Carolina Panthers

The Bears asked a lot of their defense on Sunday, and every single unit delivered in a big way. 

Midway through the third quarter, on the 11th play of a drive nearing the red zone, Eddie Goldman stuffed Cam Newton on fourth-and-2 to keep the Carolina Panthers from scoring while the Bears’ offense was sputtering to a string of three-and-outs. Akiem Hicks continued what should be a Pro Bowl season with a sack, a hurry and two tackles for a loss. Mitch Unrein teamed up with Goldman to record a sack and played well against the run. 

Leonard Floyd and Pernell McPhee each recorded sacks and consistently disrupted Newton. Danny Trevathan dropped Newton, too, and picked off a pass. Christian Jones was rock-solid next to Trevathan, helping limit Jonathan Stewart and Christian McCaffrey to 58 yards on 21 carries. 

Prince Amukamara tipped a pass intended for Kelvin Benjamin that fell into the waiting arms of Eddie Jackson for a 76-yard pick six; the rookie safety, of course, had that 75-yard fumble return score that set the tone for a dominant defensive day. Kyle Fuller continued to play like a shutdown corner, and Adrian Amos continued his solid play since stepping in for an injured Quintin Demps. 

This name-by-name breakdown is deserved for these players not only for their production, but for playing this well while the Bears’ defense was on the field for 38:35 and 69 snaps. 

Were these players tired?

“Heck yeah, we were tired,” Hicks said. 

But did it affect how they played?

“No,” Floyd said. “To be honest with you we were excited to go back out there, keep on executing. We just felt good today, just playing on a high level and hitting on all cylinders.”

The Bears’ defense hasn’t allowed a touchdown since Jerrick McKinnon gashed them for a 58-yard run in the third quarter of Oct. 9’s loss to the Minnesota Vikings. Say what you will about the Baltimore Ravens’ offensive struggles this year, but the Panthers — led by Newton, McCaffrey and Benjamin — have plenty of playmakers on offense. Newton and the Carolina offensive line were bullied for five sacks and 11 hurries, McCaffrey was largely bottled up, and Benjamin managed three catches on six targets. 

“We want to be on the field, the defense,” Trevathan said. “That’s our job. When we’re put in a tough situation, we’ve got to rise, take that as a challenge. Guys coming in our backfield trying to run in our end zone? No, it’s not going to happen. It’s an attitude and it’s an execution of the plays called and being on the same page, having fun out there and making plays."

The message from the Bears’ defensive players after Sunday’s game was less about their accomplishments, though, and more about what else they can do. But the sense is this defense believes it can be the reason why the Bears can blow past their 2016 win total, which they’ve already matched. 

Still got a long way to go,” McPhee said. “Just keep building that chemistry, that bond. We got a long way to go. We ain’t really done nothing yet. It’s great, now I love it, but we just gotta stay focused, forget about this game and move on to the Saints and go take that.

“… We got a special group, man. We just gotta keep believing in the system and keep holding each other accountable and take it one play, one game at a time.”

This was already a confident group going into Week 7 — Hicks said the Bears’ defense had one of its best weeks of practice leading up to facing the Panthers — but that belief will surely grow after Sunday. If the Bears’ defense can play this well, against a good offense, while being on the field as much as they were, there’s no reason to think this level of success can’t continue. 

“We’re trying to wake the city up, bring the city back to loving the Chicago Bears,” Floyd said. “We’re just going to keep fighting, keep going in and executing. We’re looking forward to next Sunday.” 

View from the Moon: Another sign of culture shift evident within emerging Bears team

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AP

View from the Moon: Another sign of culture shift evident within emerging Bears team

Just win, baby. That really is the whole point, or maybe points – the scoreboard points, not the style points. On Sunday, however, the defense in the Bears’ 17-3 win over the Carolina Panthers accounted for enough of both kinds of points for the Bears (3-4) to matching their win total of last season, and in the process win two straight games for the first time since mid-2015.

How much or what it really means, though, as was the case with the Bears’ win at Baltimore a week ago, will have to play out in New Orleans next Sunday. Because the last time the Bears stacked two victories, it got them to 5-6 in John Fox’s first Bears year, whereupon Robbie Gould missed some field goals and the Bears went into a two-year death spiral, fueled by a year of quarterback turmoil. “I don’t know if [the 2016 win total] is really a benchmark for us, to be honest,” Fox deadpanned.

But that was then, this is now. And a lot is different. A lot. Because in the past handful of weeks, which have seen victories over Baltimore and Carolina after a failed final possession with a chance at a winning score over Minnesota, the Bears have seemed to be pulling up from the death spiral that followed the last time they won two straight.

“We’re definitely trying to change the culture,” said linebacker Leonard Floyd, whose first-quarter sack of Carolina quarterback Cam Newton was Floyd’s fourth in the last four games. Right now, it is difficult not to sense the culture change, regardless of whether the Bears go into their off-week 4-4 or 3-5.

One of the hallmarks of success, in fields far beyond just football, is to win when you’re not performing anywhere close to your best. Everybody does well when they’re “on” and cylinders are firing. Winning when they’re not is another matter.

And the Bears won a game Sunday despite their quarterback taking as many sacks (four) as he had completed passes – this after winning a game (Baltimore) in which Mitch Trubisky threw away almost as many passes (six) as he completed (eight). Probably a pattern that neither he nor the Bears are looking to as some weird winning formula, but if they can win when they don’t play well, just maybe… .

This time at least the Bears managed to close out a game in the standard 60 minutes, which was critical since the defense, while holding Newton and the Panthers to three points. This marked the first time since midway through Newton’s rookie season (2011) that Carolina has been held to that few points, a span of 94 games.

“We didn’t score [a touchdown] as an offense, and defense carried us so we kind of felt salty that we didn’t help out more,” Trubisky said. (Consider that another small culture tweak – in eight years of Jay Cutler and, before that, Kyle Fuller and Brian Griese and Rex Grossman, “salty” was never an accusation anyone would have leveled at the offense, win or lose).

Credit Trubisky with candor and accuracy. The defense did indeed carry the offense, holding Carolina out of the end zone and in the process making it nine-plus quarters and 29 straight opposing possessions that have ended short of the end zone, extending back to Vikings running back Jerick McKinnon’s TD run in the third quarter of the Minnesota game.

It wasn’t always elite on defense. In the course of the first four games this season, the Bears defense allowed nine scoring drives of 60 yards or longer; over the past three games, a total of just two. 

Pulling the camera back to look at more than just the defense:

To put this in some sort of NFL context: No Bears opponent has been below .500 at the time they faced the Bears (Atlanta and Tampa Bay hadn’t played before they faced the Bears). This was not only the Bears’ third win; it was their third win over a team with a winning record (Pittsburgh, Baltimore, Carolina) at the time the Bears faced them. 

Sunday was not without its obvious concerns, big ones in fact.

For the second straight game, Trubisky was sacked four times. This time he appeared to take sacks rather than throw balls away as he did in Baltimore, but Trubisky was still unofficially the only starting NFL quarterback completing less than 50 percent of his passes, and his 4-for-7 day only managed to pull him even at 50 percent.

And an offensive line with a supposedly elite interior-three and a left tackle recently given a contract extension has been complicit in Trubisky taking nine sacks over the past 11 quarters. Actually, to put a little finer point on it, that would be nine sacks in the last 46 drop-backs, although some of those were admittedly Trubisky electives.

“We had more plays called [Sunday], I was just pulling them down, being conservative and taking sacks,” Trubisky said. “I was just trying to play smart, protect the football and get out of here with a win.”

That would be the informal football Gospel according to John Fox, so Trubisky is indeed learning; the downfield fireworks will come when they come. And the Panthers did come into Sunday ranked No. 2 for total sacks in the NFL.

In the meantime, the Bears could go into their off-week following New Orleans within a game of first place in the NFC North, if next weekend they defeat the Saints (4-2) and Minnesota (5-2) loses. The latter isn’t terribly likely given that the Vikings play Cleveland, but the game is in London and the Browns do have to beat SOMEBODY (don’t they?).

Regardless, that’s the math of it all, and the Bears have played themselves back from the abyss to this point. And they clearly are looking forward, not back.

“Guys just know we have a good chance of winning every week,” Trubisky said. Maybe that’s the biggest culture change taking place.