Blackhawks

On The Farm: Charlotte wins a tight one

On The Farm: Charlotte wins a tight one

Monday, Aug. 2, 2010
11:30 PM
By Kevin Czerwinski
CSNChicago.com

WHITE SOX
Charlotte (AAA)
Robert Hudsons leadoff homer to left in the eight inning propelled Charlotte to a 2-1 victory over Rochester Monday night at Knights Stadium.

The Red Wings had taken a 1-0 lead in the sixth before Charlotte tied it in the bottom of the inning on a Luis Rodriguez homer. It was his 14th homer and second in as many days and his ninth since July 16.

Brandon Hynick started and had a nice bounce-back effort, allowing a run in six innings. He had allowed 19 runs in his first 23 Triple-A innings. Hynick didnt get the decision, though, that went to Jon Adkins, who pitched two scoreless innings.

Winston-Salem (A)
Jon Gilmore continued his tear through the Carolina League Monday night as Winston-Salem rebounded from a bad weekend against Myrtle Beach with an 8-3 victory over Wilmington.

Gilmore had a pair of doubles with two RBIs and is hitting .400 (16-for-40) over his last 10 games, raising his average to .336. Seth Loman added a homer and two RBIs to make a winner of Nate Jones (8-4). He picked up his first victory since July 4 after allowing three runs in six innings.

Kannapolis (A)
The second through sixth hitters each collected a pair of hits for Kannapolis on Monday night in what turned out to be a 7-4 victory over Greensboro at Fieldcrest Cannon Stadium.

Nick Ciolli did the most damage with his two hits, connecting for a homer and driving in four. Tyler Saladino (three runs), Ian Gac, Brady Shoemaker and Kyle Colligan also had two hits apiece.

Cameron Bayne picked up his second consecutive victory after allowing two runs in seven innings.

In other action, Bristol managed only two hits and dropped a 1-0 decision to Burlington. Jordan Keegan got both the hits, extending his hitting streak to seven games. Brandon Tripp scored on a Henry Mabee wild pitch in the 10th inning, giving Jacksonville a 5-4 victory over Birmingham. Sal Sanchez had two hits, including a homer, and three RBIs.

CUBS

Daytona (A)
The Cubs saw their winning streak reach 14 games Monday evening when they topped Bradenton in the opener of a doubleheader, 2-1. The streak came to an end, however, when Dayton dropped the nightcap, 4-3, at Jackie Robinson Stadium.

Daytona managed only two hits in the opener but pushed across the winning run in the eight when Smailey Borges scored on a wild pitch. DJ Lemahieu and Mark Reed had the hits while Alex Maestri picked up the win after pitching three scoreless innings.

Chris Siegfired took the loss in the nightcap, allowing three runs on five hits in two innings. LeMahieu added two more hits and a pair of RBIs. LHP Chris Rusin was promoted to Tennessee while RHP Oswaldo Martinez was sent down from Tennessee. RHP Robert Whitenack was promoted from Peoria and player coach Matt Matulia was deactivated.

Iowa (AAA)
Austin Bibens-Dirkx overcame a shaky start on Monday to help lead the I-Cubs past Oklahoma City, 5-3, at AT&T Bricktown Ballpark.

Bibens-Dirkx (3-0) allowed three first-inning runs before settling in. He would last five innings, striking out four before a trio of relievers took care of Oklahoma City. Welington Castillo and Jason Dubois each homered for the I-Cubs.
In other action, Peoria dropped a 7-5 decision at Beloit. Brett Wallach made his Chicago debut and allowed five runs on seven hits in 4 13 innings to take the loss. Matt Cerda had a pair of hits and two RBIs while Matt Szczur had a hit in what could have been his final game for the Cubs. Outfielder Franscisco Guzman was placed on the disabled list. The AZL Reds scored three times in the 12th inning and bested the Cubs, 6-4. Ryan Hartman started and tossed two scoreless innings. He has yet to yield an earned run in six innings this year. ... Craig Albernaz's RBI single in the 10th inning gave Montgomery a 4-3 victory over Tennessee. Matt Spencer had four hits for the Smokies.

Kevin Czerwinski can be reached at ktczerwinski@gmail.com.

Blackhawks deal Michael Kempny to Capitals for conditional third-round pick

michal-kempny-0420.jpg
USA TODAY

Blackhawks deal Michael Kempny to Capitals for conditional third-round pick

The Blackhawks dealt defenseman Michael Kempny to the Washington Capitals for a third-round pick. Kempny had seven points in 31 games this season.

Kempny, 27, recorded 15 points in 81 career games for the Blackhawks. He tallied an assist in Saturday's 7-1 victory over the Capitals.

Kempny signed a one-year extension through the end of this season back in May.

Anthony Rizzo declines role as an activist, says trip to Florida 'was the hardest thing I've ever had to do'

Anthony Rizzo declines role as an activist, says trip to Florida 'was the hardest thing I've ever had to do'

MESA, Ariz. — Anthony Rizzo’s gone above and beyond for his community in the wake of one of the worst mass shootings in United States history, when 17 people lost their lives last week at Marjory Douglas Stoneman High School in Parkland, Florida, Rizzo’s alma mater.

His actions and words have carried plenty of weight in the last week, but Rizzo’s comments upon returning to Arizona were more focused on the general need for change rather than specific actions related to the issue of gun violence in America.

The Cubs’ first baseman, who returned to spring training on Monday after spending several days being with his community in Florida, repeatedly voiced the opinion — though it’s ridiculous to think there’s a counter argument that could actually qualify as someone’s opinion — that these mass shootings need to stop happening with such an incomprehensible amount of frequency.

But he stopped short of taking a full step into the national debate on the issue, clarifying that his comments made on Twitter the day of the shooting were not referencing gun control or that specific debate at all.

“Obviously, there needs to be change,” Rizzo said. “I don’t know what that is, I don’t get paid to make those decisions. I can sit back and give opinions, but you just hope somewhere up the line of command, people are thinking are thinking the same things that a lot of innocent kids are thinking: ‘Why? Why am I scared to go to school? Why am I scared to say goodbye to my son or daughter?’ God forbid someone was in an argument with someone they loved that day, how bad — it’s a bad time right now in the country with what’s going on with all these shootings.

“My opinion is my opinion. I don’t think it’s fair to my teammates and everyone else if I come out and start going one way or the other. I think, my focus is on baseball. My focus is definitely on Parkland and the community there and supporting them and whatever direction that they go. But for me it’s hard enough to hit a baseball, and it’s definitely going to be hard enough to try to be a baseball player and a politician at the same time.”

Rizzo has no more of an obligation to be a spokesman on this issue than any other American does, and his presence at his old school last week, his words at a vigil for the victims of this tragedy were powerful. Rizzo has established himself as a remarkable member of his community in Chicago, and he won the Roberto Clemente Award last season for his charitable efforts off the field. His willingness to leave Arizona and be with members of his community was reflective of the type of person Cubs fans and Chicagoans have gotten to know.

“It was the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do. Just going back, you don’t what to say. There’s nothing you can say,” Rizzo said. “When people get shot, you’re grateful that they’re alive. When they pass away, you’re grateful that you knew them, to look at the bright side of things if you can. But just to see how real it is, it’s sad.

“The more I just sat and thought about it, I felt helpless here. That’s where I grew up, in Parkland. I got in trouble there, I succeeded there, I learned how to be who I am because of Parkland, because of Stoneman Douglas. So to be across the country and not be there and then to find out some very close people have lost loved ones, to be there to help them and support them was very important to me.”

Rizzo repeatedly said how proud he is of the students of Stoneman Douglas, who have been outspoken on social media, directing their comments toward the president and other members of the government and sharing their opinions that gun control is necessary for the violence to stop.

But Rizzo refrained from wading into that debate and even chastised those who mischaracterized his Twitter comments as a call for gun regulation.

“To be very clear I did not say the word ‘gun’ one time,” he said. “Anyone out there who wrote gun control, saying I called for gun control, I think is very irresponsible and I did not say that once.

“I don’t know what needs to be done, I don’t know. I don’t know enough about it. I know there are a lot of shootings. I know they are done with a specific make, but I don’t know what needs to be done. But something, some type of change needs to happen for the better because I’m sure people in here have kids. No one right now feels very comfortable on a daily basis sending their kid to school and not knowing if they’re going to see them again.”

That kind of message might not be as declarative as some would have hoped. But it remained a powerful one, showing that even if he wasn’t ready or willing to declare himself an activist, Rizzo shares the feelings of many Americans who are simultaneously numb to the news of these shootings and completely and entirely fed up with their frequency and the lack of action taken to stop them.

“As a human being, probably everyone in here when they first the initial (reports of a) shooter, I took my next golf swing, because that’s how numb this country is to it,” Rizzo said. “Until something crazy happens, when you hear ‘open shooter’ nowadays, it’s like, ‘OK,’ take your next breath and keep going. Then I found out it was at Douglas, you get a little more concerned, ‘OK, what’s going on.’ At first it’s a few people injured, then you found out it was what it was, and it’s just — it’s gut-wrenching. You just go numb.

“I stand behind my community, and I’m really proud of how everyone’s coming together. Obviously I said there needs to be change, I don’t know what the change needs to be. I’m just really proud of those kids and how they’re coming together and becoming one in Parkland. It’s really inspiring to see, and it makes me proud.”