Cubs

McAuliffe hopes to bounce back in 2012-13

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McAuliffe hopes to bounce back in 2012-13

Glenbrook North was unbeaten, ranked among the best teams in the Chicago area and dreaming of the postseason success that coach Dave Weber's team experienced during the Jon Scheyer era.

Then the dream turned into a nightmare. Andrew McAuliffe, the team's leading scorer, suffered a fractured patella and spent most of the rest of the season in a brace and undergoing rehabilitation. The Spartans finished 20-6, losing to Niles North by one point in the regional final.

"I scored 29 points in a game against Niles North in December. I hurt my knee in the first quarter but I played the rest of the game," McAuliffe recalled. "I went to the emergency room that night to see what was wrong. They said it wasn't an ACL or a tendon tear.

"So I went to a doctor, got an X-ray and he said it was a broken patella. I didn't have to have surgery. But I was in a brace for a month-and-a-half, then rehab for three weeks. I came back and played the last five games of the year. I was about 60 percent.

"I was definitely frustrated. I had started off well (16 ppg, 5 rpg) and the team had started off well. I tried to stay positive. I knew being negative wouldn't help the team. I got back as soon as I could. But it was a real bummer, very frustrating."

McAuliffe, a 6-foot-8 junior, watched practice every day. He went to a pool and tried to stay in shape, swimming for 30 minutes a day. After the season, he iced his knee daily and began to work out with his AAU team. He still isn't 100 percent but he is getting better and better.

"In my first tournament, my knee felt sore after playing four games on the weekend. But I got stronger with more tournaments. The more I play, the better it is. Days off aren't a good thing for me," he said.

At the recent Best Buy tournament in Minneapolis, McAuliffe began to feel like his old self again. "My knee felt great. I was moving well and jumping well. I played through the soreness. It felt great to play again without having to worry about my knee. Now I'm almost there. Some days I'm sore, some days I'm not. I'm close to 100 percent," he said.

McAuliffe is eager to play with Fundamental University team in upcoming tournaments at Orlando and Las Vegas and looking ahead to the July evaluation period. He has scholarship offers from Loyola, Northern Illinois, Davidson, Drake, Tulane, Santa Clara, Belmont, Bucknell and Holy Cross and can expect more when he demonstrates that his knee is healthy.

"I'm not worried about recruiting. Offers will come in. I feel I am a major Division I player," he said. "I was a little worried. I knew I'd get back healthy but I was concerned about how much I'd have to work to get healthy. I'm a better player now. But it was brutal missing those 2 12 months.

"I'm keeping my options open, hoping high Division I offers will come. I'm not stressing over it. I think my game is what college coaches are looking for. My game? I'm a power forward. I'm good at passing to guards on the double team and I can step out and shoot from 15 feet. I want coaches to know I work really hard. I'm working a lot on extending my game and taking people off their dribble. I'm a team player. I make my teammates better."

Recruiting analysts Roy and Harv Schmidt of Illinois Prep Bulls-Eye see McAuliffe as a good fit for the Atlantic 10 or Conference USA. "He would be a steal for the Horizon, MAC or Missouri Valley," they said.

Weber believes once college recruiters get another look at McAuliffe this summer that they will be convinced he is ready to play at their level.

"He is definitely a Division I player," Weber said. "We will know in the summer, when he is fully healed, at what level of Division I, whether he is a high major player or mid-major. But he has the potential to play at a higher level.

"He is a power forward playing center for us. He is very skilled, very athletic inside and can dominate a game. He is a good shooter from the perimeter. The big problem is big guys in high school aren't always dominant because guards usually dominate in high school."

Mike Weinstein, McAuliffe's AAU coach, agrees with Weber's assessment. "He is good enough to play at a high major level but he has to show he is fully healthy by July. Now he is a mid-plus player. If he goes to a mid-plus school, he will be a dominant player and be able to score against high major players. But he needs to get the spring back in his legs and needs to show that he is healthy," Weinstein said.

He pointed out that several major Division I programs, including Illinois, Wisconsin, Stanford and Virginia are monitoring McAuliffe's progress. Illinois-Chicago and Illinois State also are interested.

McAuliffe doesn't need any more motivation than that.

Cubs Talk Podcast: Takeaways from Cubs Convention and players primed for a 2018 breakout

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USA TODAY

Cubs Talk Podcast: Takeaways from Cubs Convention and players primed for a 2018 breakout

On the latest edition of the Cubs Talk Podcast, Kelly Crull, Tony Andracki, Jon Graff, Matt Buckman and Scott Changnon rattle off their main takeaways from the weekend’s Cubs Convention, including the funniest moments and how the players engaged with fans and each other throughout the three days at the Sheraton Grand Chicago.

Plus, which players — besides Kyle Schwarber — made the most of the offseason and are primed for a breakout in 2018? The crew gives its take, with options including Albert Almora Jr., Ian Happ and Jason Heyward.

Take a listen below:

Will Bears see instant improvement under Matt Nagy? Putting his first-year expectations in context

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USA TODAY

Will Bears see instant improvement under Matt Nagy? Putting his first-year expectations in context

Circling back around from the playoffs to the Bears, or at least to the Bears using the current postseason as a bit of a prism, magnifying glass, measuring stick, all of the above:

The ultimate question, obviously meaningfully unanswerable for perhaps another 10 or 11 months, revolves around expectations that were ushered in along with Matt Nagy and the rest of his coaching staff. One early guess is that there’ll be an inevitable positive bump in the record, the only true measuring stick. Depending on changes in practices, strength training, luck, whatever, Nagy might fare better than John Fox simply by virtue of having a presumably healthier roster — pick any three Bears who were injured during the 2017 season: Leonard Floyd, Cameron Meredith, Eric Kush, Kyle Long, Pernell McPhee, Mitch Unrein, Kevin White and Willie Young — and a broken-in Mitch Trubisky from the get-go.

This is far from a given, however. Far, far from a given for the Bears. Of the 10 coaches hired in the 50 years since George Halas stopped, only Fox, Dick Jauron and Dave Wannstedt improved on the winning percentage of their immediate predecessor. All dipped, save for Jack Pardee, who in 1975 equaled the 4-10 finish of Abe Gibron before him. And Pardee was getting Walter Payton in that year’s draft, so things started looking up in a hurry.

And maybe that should be the expectation for Nagy, who projects to get some or all of Fox’s wounded back, plus a draft class beginning with No. 8 overall.

Better Bears record in 2018? Maybe, but ...

The Bears are perhaps something of an anomaly (imagine that) in the near constant of incoming coaches failing to improve matters in their first years. One of the more memorable aspects of this writer’s first year on the Bears beat (1992) — besides the obvious pyrotechnics of Mike Ditka’s epic final season — was the startling turnarounds effected by first-year (and first-time) NFL coaches that year, with several teams on the Bears’ schedule that year, meaning there were chances to study those in depth.

Consider: Bill Cowher took the Steelers from 7-9 to 11-5, Dennis Green took the Vikings from 8-8 to 11-5, Mike Holmgren took the Packers from 4-12 to 11-5, Bobby Ross took the Chargers from 4-12 to 11-5, and Dave Shula took the Bengals from 3-13 to 5-11.

The Bears played all but the Chargers that year, losing twice to Green, once to Holmgren and defeating the Cowher and Shula teams. Holmgren’s Packers didn’t make the playoffs, but he had to make an in-season quarterback change, which worked out pretty well long-term (Brett Favre).

Bears coaching-change history notwithstanding, the Nagy bar should be well above the five wins of Fox’s 2017. Nagy is a first-time head coach, but none of Cowher, Green, Holmgren, Ross or Shula had ever been NFL head coaches previously, either. Green and Ross had been college head coaches, albeit Green with a losing record and Ross barely .500 in those tenures.

And those coaches were taking over in the last year before the advent of free agency, which began in 1993. The Bears “landed” Anthony Blaylock and Craig Heyward. The Vikings secured Jack Del Rio. The Packers, Reggie White.

Odd years coming

Expectations vs. results will be interesting to observe in quite a few places this season. In some spots, the situation wasn’t completely broken but they “fixed” it anyway, in the dubious tradition of the Bears axing Lovie Smith after consecutive seasons of 11-5, 8-8 and 10-6 — two more wins (29) than Fox and Marc Trestman had combined (27) over the next five years.

Sometimes that sort of thing can work out. Phil Jackson did get the Michael Jordan Bulls to the next level that Doug Collins hadn’t. And Joe Maddon got the Cubs over the Rick Renteria hump, though adding Kris Bryant, Dexter Fowler and Jon Lester probably helped, too. Fox got the Broncos into a Super Bowl with Peyton Manning, but Gary Kubiak won one with Manning. Fox’s Broncos went against the 2013 Seattle Seahawks, one of the top 10 defenses of all time, while Kubiak had the good fortune of instead having one of the all-time great defenses in 2015.

But back to current NFL case studies:

— The Lions fired Jim Caldwell after a 9-7 season, his third winning year out of four there, two of those going to the playoffs.

— The Titans concluded their playoff year with the exit of Mike Mularkey, his reward for a second straight 9-7 that reversed four straight losing years under others.

— Chuck Pagano had five .500-or-better seasons with the Colts, didn’t have Andrew Luck all year, and was fired two years after going 5-3 with Matt Hasselbeck filling in for Luck.

What the expectations are in those venues is their business, just as it was when Phil Emery launched Smith in a fashion similar to the Titans with Mularkey. Smith didn’t reach the 2012 playoffs but would have been fired for anything short of a Super Bowl appearance, as Mularkey was for only winning one playoff game with Marcus Mariota as his quarterback.

All of which makes the Nagy/Pace Era more than a little intriguing. Nagy takes over a team with a No. 2-overall quarterback, as Mularkey did with Mariota. Some of Mularkey’s undoing traced to failing to maximize Mariota with an offense suited to how his quarterback plays his best, and force-fitting a player into a scheme is high-risk at best.

That doesn’t really apply in the case of a conservatively wired Fox, who directed that the offense be kept under ball-security control with a rookie quarterback. Fox and Dowell Loggains arguably were as constrained by Trubisky as he was by them.

But Nick Foles flourished with the Eagles under Chip Kelly and Doug Pederson, struggling a bit under Jeff Fisher. Case Keenum, a teammate of Foles when the Rams played in St. Louis, was so-so under the defense-based Fisher with the Rams, yet went supernova this year under the defense-based Mike Zimmer with the Vikings, which speaks to the value of the right coordinator irrespective of the head coach’s offensive or defensive background.

In the end Nagy’s achievements will be player-based. They always are. What he can do with what he’s got and given, via draft, free agency or whatever, vs. the successes and non-successes of others in his situation, is the work in progress now.