Cubs

Meet the jurors in the re-trial of Roger Clemens

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Meet the jurors in the re-trial of Roger Clemens

From Comcast SportsNetThumbnail sketches of the jurors who will decide whether pitcher Roger Clemens lied to Congress when he denied using performance-enhancing drugs. The information comes from public statements by the jurors themselves during jury selection in the case last week. U.S. Judge Reggie Walton told the jurors not to have any exposure to media coverage of the case. It was not immediately disclosed which four are alternates.------Seat 1: Female, single, supermarket cashier for five years. Says, "I'm not a big fan of sports, period." Never heard of Clemens, and says, "If he did indulge, I believe he should be penalized."Seat 2: Female, plays golf, not a baseball fan, but watches golf, tennis and the Super Bowl. Recently retired, she has worked at an association for psychologists and as an elementary school teacher.Seat 3: Female, program analyst with Washington, D.C., Department of Human Services since 2000. Took prelaw classes and considered going to law school. Never heard of Clemens and doesn't follow sports. Loves to read and bake.Seat 4: Female, occupational therapist. Attended two baseball games in her life, both in Washington -- one at old Griffith Stadium and one at Nationals Park. Not a baseball fan.Seat 5: Male, studied engineering and bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania. Hockey fan, likes long-distance running and working out. Knows a lot of people who took performance-enhancing drugs, but says PEDs were not for him. Thought 2008 congressional hearings on steroids were "excessive."Seat 6: Female, curatorial researcher at the Smithsonian, not a sports fan. On 2008 congressional hearings on steroids, she said, "At the time, I felt maybe that was not the best use of Congress' time when they have so many other things to deal with."Seat 7: Male, heard of Clemens but said he couldn't identify what position he played. Testified before Congress several times, most recently on cyber legislation, representing financial sector. Now an official at the U.S. Treasury Department. Went to Yale School of Management.Seat 8: Female, teaches deaf and hard of hearing, from Buffalo. Likes photography and fabric art. Not a sports fan, doesn't know Clemens.Seat 9: Male, works as administrative assistant at Canadian embassy (next door to the courthouse). Worked at life insurance company. Was a premed student at Howard University. Speaks French and Spanish. Not a baseball fan. Asked about Clemens' 2008 congressional testimony, he said Clemens "seemed forthright."Seat 10: Female, goes to one baseball game a year. Not a sports fan. Works at American Council on Education as librarian and in continuing education. Likes classical music, cooking vegetarian food and "light philosophy." Not a sports fan.Seat 11: Male, unemployed 27-year-old who said his reaction to jury duty was "No, no, no, no, no," and that he'd rather be sleeping than in court. Likes basketball but not baseball and has never heard of Clemens. Promised to be "wide awake" if selected for jury.Seat 12: Male, retired, grew up in Germany, moved to U.S. at the age of 15 in 1946. Taught political science at University of Massachusetts-Amherst for 25 years, also taught at Smith. Didn't recognize Clemens' name; only sport he follows is soccer.Seat 13: Female, retiree, active in effort to get voting rights for D.C. Worked at U.S. Department of Transportation and Bureau of Public Debt. Said her husband told her, upon learning she might serve on this trial, "Get out of it, don't do it!," eliciting chuckle from Clemens.Seat 14: Female, environmental lawyer, ran cross-country and track in high school. Doesn't follow sports. Knew Clemens as a "well-regarded pitcher," but "didn't know he was connected to steroids."Seat 15: Male, says he grew up in River Edge, N.J., down the street from a house rented by New York Yankee stars Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris. Been going to gym since 1975, knows people who use steroids, calls it a "pretty stupid thing to do." Avid cyclist. Works as senior program analyst for Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Studied docket of Clemens case.Seat 16: Female, works in law enforcement with the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, calls herself a "sharpshooter." When not working, sleeps and cooks a lot. Not a sports fan, and hadn't heard of Clemens.

Cubs Talk Podcast: Where do Cubs go from here with Jake Arrieta, Wade Davis?

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USA TODAY

Cubs Talk Podcast: Where do Cubs go from here with Jake Arrieta, Wade Davis?

In the latest CubsTalk Podcast, Kelly Crull and David Kaplan look ahead to Thanksgiving and discuss the official coaching hires for the Cubs.

They also talk about where the Cubs go from here with Jake Arrieta and Wade Davis, whether Alex Cobb could factor into the rotation plans and Kap goes off on the 11:30 a.m. Opening Day start time.

Check out the entire podcast here:

Why Dion Sims' return may not lessen Adam Shaheen's role in the Bears' offense

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USA Today

Why Dion Sims' return may not lessen Adam Shaheen's role in the Bears' offense

Dion Sims was limited in practice on Wednesday, but he participated — marking the first practice he took part in since Oct. 27. Sims said he feels “great,” so assuming he’s getting closer to playing on Sunday against the Philadelphia Eagles, that begs the question: What does it mean for Adam Shaheen?

The short answer, according to offensive coordinator Dowell Loggains: Not much. 

“We don’t want to slow down his progress,” Loggains said. “And as long as he’s making steps in the right direction — we’re high on Dion Sims as well — but we do not want to slow down Adam’s progress that way.”

Shaheen has caught all six of his targets the last two weeks, totaling 80 yards with a touchdown and displaying some encouraging chemistry with quarterback Mitchell Trubisky (who was his offseason roommate after the pair were drafted in April). Against Green Bay and Detroit, Shaheen played 52 and 73 percent of the Bears' snaps, respectively. 

The Bears didn’t use Shaheen in Sunday’s critical two-minute drive against the Detroit Lions, though, turning to Daniel Brown instead of their second-round draft pick. Loggians explained that he didn’t want to overload Shaheen with responsibilities after his elevation on the depth chart due to Sims’ illness and Zach Miller’s season-ending injury. So Shaheen was tasked mostly with first- and second-down plays, while Brown became the Bears’ third down and two-minute guy at tight end. 

“It was mainly so Adam could focus in on his role,” Loggains said. “And as he keeps growing that way, we’ll  keep expanding that package for him. But that was the reason why.”

The Bears need Shaheen’s role to expand, though, for him to meet the usual expectations placed upon a 45th overall pick. There are going to be some situations, especially running ones, where Sims has to be on the field, possibly at the expense of Shaheen. But if the Bears were to step back and take a bigger-picture look at their offense, there are some good signs of Shaheen and Trubisky growing together, just as the team hoped when they made the pair their first two selections in the 2017 draft. The return of Sims shouldn’t disrupt that growth. 

“He’s earned the play time the last two weeks,” Loggains said. “He’s played better and better and he had some things on the first level in the blocking game that he needs to improve on that Dion is really good at because he’s played a little bit longer. We do want to play him, continue to grow him, continue to grow him and grow the reps that way, especially without having Zach here. So there is a role that — we’re still missing a little bit of a role that we’re kind of splitting between Adam and Dan. 

“But we’ll continue to play him more, and each game will be a little bit different, how it dictates. But yes, we do see him, his role just like Tarik (Cohen’s) to continue to grow weekly.”