Preps Talk

Officially retired, is L.T. headed to Hall of Fame?

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Officially retired, is L.T. headed to Hall of Fame?

From Comcast SportsNet
SAN DIEGO (AP) -- LaDainian Tomlinson was in the midst of saying goodbye to the NFL when his young son, Daylen, wandered across the dais and tugged on his pants, wanting a little attention. Tomlinson reached down and lifted him up, holding him as carefully as he used to carry the football. Joined by his family and several former teammates, Tomlinson ended his brilliant 11-year NFL career the same way he started it -- with the San Diego Chargers. Tomlinson signed a one-day contract with the Chargers on Monday and then announced his retirement. "It wasn't because I didn't want to play anymore. It was simply time to move on," Tomlinson said. Tomlinson rushed for 13,684 yards, fifth all-time, and scored 162 touchdowns, third-most ever. His 145 rushing touchdowns are second-most in history. He also passed for seven touchdowns. Just as importantly, he helped the Chargers dig out from one of their worst periods to become a force in the AFC West division. He played his first nine seasons with San Diego and the last two years with the New York Jets. Tomlinson, who turns 33 on Saturday, said he knew at the end of last season that he'd probably retire. He said he was still physically capable of playing but mentioned the mental toll it takes to play at a high level. Tomlinson didn't shed any tears, as he did two years ago after being released by the Chargers. L.T. recalled the news conference in 2006 when former teammate Junior Seau announced his first retirement. "He said, I'm graduating today.' I've been playing football 20-some years and so at some point it almost seems like school every year where you sacrifice so much and there is so much you put on the line, mentally and physically, with your body, everything," Tomlinson said. "So today, I take the words of Junior Seau: I feel like I'm graduating. I really do, because I've got my life ahead of me, I'm healthy, I'm happy with a great family and I'm excited to now be a fan and watch you guys play." Seau, who committed suicide on May 2, came out of retirement a few times to play for the New England Patriots. Tomlinson said this is it for him. Tomlinson said he has special memories even though the Chargers never got to the Super Bowl during his time with them. His most memorable moment with San Diego came in December 2006, when he swept into the end zone late in a game against the Denver Broncos for his third touchdown of the afternoon to break Shaun Alexander's year-old record of 28 touchdowns in a season. His linemen hoisted him onto their shoulders and carried him toward the sideline, with Tomlinson holding the ball high in his right hand and waving his left index finger, while the fans chanted "L.T.! L.T.!" and "MVP! MVP!" Tomlinson was voted NFL MVP that season, when he set league single-season records with 31 touchdowns, including 28 rushing, and 186 points. "Those were championship days, for not only myself and my teammates, but my family as well," said Tomlinson, who won two NFL rushing titles. "So I'm OK with never winning a Super Bowl championship. I know we've got many memories that we can call championship days." Chargers President Dean Spanos said few players have had a bigger role or meant more to the team and the city than Tomlinson. Spanos said no other Chargers player will wear Tomlinson's No. 21, and that a retirement ceremony will be held sometime in the future. "People and players like LaDainian Tomlinson don't come around very often, if at all," Jets chairman and CEO Woody Johnson said in a statement. "His humility and work ethic made it clear why he will be remembered as one of the game's best players. Without question, his next stop will be the Pro Football Hall of Fame."

Marist tight end TJ Ivy commits to Indiana

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RIVALS

Marist tight end TJ Ivy commits to Indiana

Needless to say, it's been an eventual few weeks for Marist tight end TJ Ivy.

Ivy, who was verbally committed to West Virginia since the early summer, found himself having to reopen his recruiting process last week after the Mountaineers staff told him to keep his options open.

Monday night, Ivy decided to again end his recruiting process, giving the Indiana Hoosiers his verbal commitment.

"I'm just really happy about my decision to commit to Indiana," Ivy said. "After the entire West Virginia deal happened, the Indiana coaches were the first coaches to call me. I never really closed the door with them, and I'm very happy."

Ivy, who at one point earlier this summer had more than 20 FBS scholarship offers, always had the Hoosiers near the top of his list.

"Even before I decided to commit to West Virginia, Indiana was always in the picture and was neck and neck for a long time up until I made my decision," he said. "I love how Indiana's offense used and utilizes the tight end position. Coach (Mike) DeBord likes to really use the tight end as a big part of his offense, and it's just a great system and a great fit for me. I've been to Indiana a handful of times already, and everything else that Indiana has to offer is exceptional. Indiana offers a great education, one of the most beautiful campuses I've ever seen, and the football program is heading in the right direction. I'm also planning to major in Sports Marketing and Indiana has one of the top three academic programs in the nation for my major."

Ivy is now thankful that he never closed the door or disrespected any other schools during his recruiting process.

"I learned a long time ago to never close a door and to never leave a bad impression. In this day and age you just never know what can happen. I always try to stay positive and treat people with the utmost respect. That included all of the schools and coaches who recruited me."

Fire preparing for playoffs to be 'incredibly different'

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USA TODAY

Fire preparing for playoffs to be 'incredibly different'

The two teams heading into Wednesday’s MLS playoff opener have very different recent histories.

The New York Red Bulls are entering into an eighth straight postseason while the Fire have made it just one other year, 2012, during the Red Bulls’ run. So while the Red Bulls have plenty of playoff experience, the Fire have just a few players on the roster who have played in the playoffs, Arturo Alvarez, Michael Harrington, Juninho and former Red Bull Dax McCarty.

McCarty is in the spotlight a bit more than normal because of the subplot of facing his former team in the playoffs after his drama-filled exit in January. He also gets to tell his team about just how different the playoffs are from the regular season.

“It’s incredibly different, in every sense,” McCarty said on Monday. “I can’t stress that enough. The little details, they become even finer. The margin between winning and losing is so thin that the team that is sharper on the day, the team that is more physical on the day, the team that works harder on the day, that’s usually the team that gives themselves the best chance to win. Now, you have to obviously add in quality to go along with that, but playoff games are not like regular season games. They’re just not.”

McCarty also shared this message, along with some of the other MLS playoff veterans, with the team on Monday. For someone like David Accam, who endured back-to-back last place finishes in his first two years with the Fire, this is a good kind of different.

“We had a meeting, everyone shared their experience and how the playoffs is and how they felt during the playoffs,” Accam said. “I’ve played in major competitions before and I know the feeling. It’s a knockout game and you want to win. A lot of people are watching and you want to show that you are good enough to be playing in this type of game so everyone is excited.”

McCarty played in a number of big games with the Red Bulls, but the club hasn’t made MLS Cup since 2008. For all of their regular season success, which includes Supporters' Shields in 2013 and 2015, the Red Bulls have developed a reputation of struggling in the playoffs.

“I know first-hand that that team has been through some battles and they’ve had a lot of heartbreak and they’ve had guys that have been in really big games before,” McCarty said. “I think we have, too, but to a lesser extent.

"I think experience is important because you know what to expect... In a sense that helps settle the nerves a little bit.”

The experience gap as far as MLS playoffs go is big, but others on the Fire have big match experience. Johan Kappelhof participated in the Dutch Eredivisie’s playoffs to qualify for the Europa League and of course Bastian Schweinsteiger has won the Champions League and the World Cup.

As for the German, he returned to training on Monday. The team arrived from Houston on Sunday night and would normally have a regen day or an off day after a match, but the short turnaround didn’t allow for that. Schweinsteiger sat out the last two games due to a calf injury that has limited him to one 19-minute appearance in the past seven matches, but should be back Wednesday.

“I feel OK," Schweinsteiger said. "I mean obviously I didn’t play so many minutes in the past month, but I feel OK. Let’s see.”

Will he start?

"It's a secret," he said with a laugh.

The concept of playoffs to Schweinsteiger is literally a bit foreign. He quipped about how different the seasons are compared to what he’s used to.

“We came third in the whole country,” Schweinsteiger said. “I don’t know if you were expecting that before the season. I think it’s good, but at the end of the day in America it depends on the playoffs. In the Bundesliga you would be in the Champions League, but here it’s more or less, yeah, nothing.

“It’s going to be hopefully a great evening for us.”