White Sox

Pitcher banned 8 games for illegal substance

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Pitcher banned 8 games for illegal substance

From Comcast SportsNet
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Tampa Bay reliever Joel Peralta was suspended for eight games by Major League Baseball on Thursday for having pine tar on his glove. Peralta has appealed, and can continue to play until the process is complete. The Rays were at Washington on Thursday night. Peralta was ejected from Tuesday night's game in Washington after umpires found pine tar on his mitt. The incident led to a verbal spat between managers Joe Maddon of the Rays and Davey Johnson of the Nationals. "I just know that we're appealing right now so I've got to sit tight and see," Peralta said. "I'm allowed to pitch today and that's all I care about right now." Peralta, who pitched for the Nationals during the 2010 season, said his former teammates approached him before Wednesday's game and were supportive. He didn't suspect that they turned him in. "I knew it wasn't them," Peralta said. "I knew when they did it was not coming from the players. That made me feel good. I know they like me." He said he didn't know Johnson. "I don't know why he did it," Peralta said. "I would like to know, but I'm not gonna ask that." Maddon feels the suspension is excessive. "Of course it's too much, and of course it's unfair, but that's the way they came down with it and it's gonna be up to them to try and manipulate it," Maddon said. Johnson declined to comment on the suspension on Thursday afternoon. Peralta hopes to get the suspension reduced. "First time it's ever happened to me. I don't know what to think. I don't know what to expect," Peralta said. "It feels a little relief to know at least what it's gonna be." After Tuesday's game, Maddon denounced Johnson's actions as cowardly, bush and bogus. Johnson retorted that Maddon should "read the rule book" and that he was "a weird wuss." During the 1988 National League championship series, Los Angeles Dodgers reliever Jay Howell was suspended for three games after being caught with pine tar on his glove. The suspension was reduced by a game by appeal. In that series, Johnson was the manager of the Dodgers' opponent, the New York Mets.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Class A manager Justin Jirschele, youngest manager in professional baseball

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White Sox Talk Podcast: Class A manager Justin Jirschele, youngest manager in professional baseball

27-year-old Justin Jirschele made quite an impression in his first season as manager of the White Sox Class-A affiliate in Kannapolis. He helped lead the Intimidators to the South Atlantic League championship, and was named White Sox Minor League Coach of the Year. Jirschele came on the podcast to speak with Chuck Garfien about how he went from playing minor league baseball with the White Sox to coaching in their system. He talks about how growing up with a dad who was coaching minor league baseball helped mold him as a manager who is wise beyond his years. Jirschele also gives a report on some of the top White Sox prospects he managed last season such as Jake Burger, Alec Hansen, Dane Dunning and Miker Adolfo.

Zach LaVine cleared for contact practice

Zach LaVine cleared for contact practice

The Zach LaVine comeback is one step closer as the shooting guard was cleared for contact practice after checking with his doctors in California. 

LaVine will go through a step by step process over the next few weeks and the Bulls will gauge his progress to see when the best time for his return will be. 

But, given the nine-month process from his ACL injury he suffered in February, he's right on track and there doesn't appear to be any setbacks. 

"There’s no real timeframe, I guess," Bulls coach Fred Hoiberg said at practice Monday. "It’s really going to be on how he feels. We’ll try to do a little more every day with him. We did a little bit, got him some light contact today just to get the process started.

"He’ll be able to play a little two-on-two with not a lot of practice time these next 10 days. But we’ll throw him out there and continue to try to get him feeling better. There’s going to be a mental hurdle that he’s going to have to clear as well. I know he’s excited. His teammates are excited and the coaches are obviously excited as well."

LaVine's recovery has gone as planned since his arrival in Chicago from the Jimmy Butler trade on draft night. Targeting a mid-December return seems realistic but of course, the Bulls will take every precaution to make sure he's healthy for the long term, both for LaVine and the franchise, as he's a restricted free agent this summer--and they have no plans on letting him walk. 

LaVine told NBC Sports Chicago recently that he wants to get on the floor immediately but the Bulls know they'll have to protect him from himself in the meantime. 

"He’s going to have to string together a lot of really good days, and he knows that," Hoiberg said. "He understands that. The important thing is he’s right on track from where it was said after the injury. He’s been doing a great job with his rehab. He’s on time. He’s doing everything that’s asked of him. His strength numbers are where they’re supposed to be. I’m confident he’s going to keep making progress. But we’ll absolutely monitor it daily and hopefully it’ll just continue to get better."

The Bulls aren't sure if they'll send LaVine to the G-League but it's certain they have plans on not only how to use him when he steps on the floor but also a regimen they've stuck to, to ensure there are no real setbacks. 

Hoiberg has been salivating over having a true scorer at that position since trading for him, and LaVine has been eager since his arrival to prove to the Bulls and fans that he is a franchise player. 

Prudence in the moment of progression, though, appears to be the approach taken by both sides.