White Sox

Quicker: Bears need work on late-game drills

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Quicker: Bears need work on late-game drills

The Bears' organized team activities pretty much have wound down. The next opportunity to get better will be the June 12-14 minicamp. I would guesstimate that roughly 80-85 percent of the schematic install is complete on both offense, defense and special teams. Installed material will be repeated once again during the next mini-camp along with new wrinkles and additions.

4 Minute

Its tough to cover every situation during OTAs like, for example, the four-minute drill (running out the clock situation). Players are not in pads, which makes it difficult to accurately reflect the pressure and intensity this situation commands. The four-minute situation will be hammered upon during training camp when it can be conducted live, in full pads, in a true game-like atmosphere to teach its significance upon a game. The Bears' coaches have a great teaching tool on tape from 2011 of how the four-minute situation can determine a win or loss. I dont think I need to remind Bears fans of the critical error by former running back, Marion Barber, who elected to run out of bounds versus the Denver Broncos, thus stopping the clock. Poor execution by Barber on this one play resulted in a Chicago loss to Denver.

2 Minute

The two-minute situation should receive some adequate attention this upcoming minicamp. Considering how many NFL games actually come down to the two-minute drill is why it is emphasized so heavily. It will easily get two days of actual work during the Bears' three-day minicamp. The two-minute drill can also be accurately simulated offensively and defensively as you can physically move the ball creating down and distance situations. Jay Cutler and the offense will be presented situations like:

First and 10 on your own 35-yard line, one timeout remaining, 1:10 left on the clock and Bears are down by four points. Obviously, the offense needs to score a touchdown to win.

Or...

First and 10 on your own 10-yard line, three timeouts remaining, 1:45 left on the clock, Bears down 21-20. Thus, the offense needs to, at minimum, position the team for a field goal to win.

There are numerous scenarios coaches could present during a two-minute situation. Its a terrific drill for both offense and defense because both sides have to play the situation presented. It also is extremely competitive as both sides are challenged to execute. Its competitive because there is a true winner and loser during this particular period during practice and players love that.

The two-minute drill most likely has already been introduced to players earlier in OTAs, but with so many situations for coaches to cover, the drill can never be practiced enough. Different plays from three-by-one sets (three wide receivers to one side and one lone wide receiver to the other) or two-by-two sets (two wide receivers on each side of the football) are covered and specifically game-planned when they should be called. It forces players to know their playbook and think quickly because time is of the essence.

Its why this column was titled Quicker. The Bears' final minicamp is quickly approaching, training camp will quickly be upon them, and then the season opener will quickly be here. The quicker the Bears address these situations, the better chance for success in 2012.

Jose Abreu's got a new beard, but what he really deserves is a contract extension

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USA TODAY

Jose Abreu's got a new beard, but what he really deserves is a contract extension

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Sunday marked the first surprise of White Sox spring training, courtesy of first baseman Jose Abreu.

“This year, I’m going to try to steal more bases,” Abreu said through a translator.

This might have sounded like a joke, but Abreu was completely serious.

On paper, he’s not exactly Rickey Henderson. In 614 career games, Abreu has only six stolen bases. However, the slimmed-down first baseman does have some sneaky speed. His six triples last season ranked third in the American League. So there are some wheels to work with.

“I like the challenge. I think that’s a good challenge for me. I’m ready for it,” Abreu said.

How many steals are we talking about? A reporter asked sarcastically if a 30-30 season is in the offing? Abreu didn’t exactly shoot down the possibility.

“Who knows? When you fill your mind with positive things, maybe you can accomplish them,” Abreu said. “The mind of a human being works in a lot of different ways. If you fill your mind with good things, good things are going to happen.”

The morning began with Abreu walking to the hitting cages with his Cuban compadres Yoan Moncada and Luis Robert, who the White Sox signed last summer. He held his first workout on Sunday. At the White Sox hitters camp last month, Moncada took Robert under his wing, showing him the ropes, even telling Ricky Renteria, “I got him.”

But Sunday, Abreu was in charge, holding court with the three of them in the cage. Abreu watched closely as Robert hit off a tee, giving him pointers about his swing.

“I just like to help people,” Abreu said. “When I started to play at 16 in Cuba, I had a lot people who hounded me to get better. At the same point, I want to give back things that I’ve learned and pass that along to other people. That’s what I’m doing. I’m not expecting anything else. I’m just glad to help them and get them better.”

What kind of advice has he passed along to Robert?

“Since I came to this country, I learned quickly three keys to be a success: Be disciplined, work hard and always be on time. If you apply those three keys, I think you’re going to be good. Those are the three keys I’m trying to teach the new kids, the young guys,” Abreu said.

Abreu lost about 10 pounds during the offseason. He said he hopes to learn more English in 2018. He also arrived at spring training sporting a scruffy beard which he grew while he was in Cuba so he “could be incongnito.”

Abreu likes his new look. Moncada thinks he should shave it off.

“If the organization doesn’t say anything, I’m just going to keep it,” Abreu said.

Well, so much for that.

Moments after Abreu spoke with the media, Renteria told reporters that Abreu will have to “clean it up a bit.”

The two will find a compromise. Come to think of it, maybe Abreu and the White Sox should do the same about a contract extension in the near future.

Yes, he’ll be 33 when his contract expires in two years, but there have been no signs of a decline with his performance. Instead, Abreu is only getting better both offensively and defensively.

Heck, now he wants to steal bases, too.

After Renteria, Abreu is the leader of this team. He commands ultimate respect inside the clubhouse. He’s become another coach to Moncada, Robert and others. He’s a huge brick in the present and too big of an influence and cornerstone to not have around in the future.

“I hope to play my entire career in the majors with the White Sox,” Abreu said Sunday. “But I can’t control that.”

At some point, a decision will have to be made whether to keep Abreu or trade him. In the meantime, ask yourself this question: What will bring more value to the White Sox, getting a high-end prospect or two in return not knowing if they’ll ever succeed in the majors? Or keeping your best player, the heart and soul of your team, allowing him to show your future stars the way while they’re developing in the major leagues?

Seems like an easy decision to me.

Capitals' Devante Smith-Pelly speaks out about 'racially charged chanting' at United Center

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AP

Capitals' Devante Smith-Pelly speaks out about 'racially charged chanting' at United Center

After being on the receiving end of some racist taunts while he was in the penalty box during Saturday's game against the Blackhawks, Capitals winger Devante Smith-Pelly spoke publicly about the incident.

Smith-Pelly, a 25-year-old Canadian, reacted to the fans while he was in the box, going up to them from the other side of the glass. He addressed questions from the media about the incident on Sunday.

"I just heard some chanting, some, I guess, racially charged chanting," Smith-Pelly said. "You can tell by my reaction that I got pretty upset.

"What was said this time around crossed the line."

The Capitals released a statement about the incident:

"The Washington Capitals are extremely disappointed by the intolerant behavior extended toward Devante Smith-Pelly by a select group of fans during Saturday night's game against the Chicago Blackhawks at United Center. The Capitals organization strives to be inclusive and has zero tolerance concerning any form of racism. Such behavior is unacceptable and has no place in hockey or society. As such, it is crucial to confront such appalling conduct, and the Capitals extend their appreciation to the Blackhawks organization and United Center security for swiftly removing the fans from the game."

The Blackhawks released a statement after the game with a similar tone.

Smith-Pelly said this has happened previously in his career.

"It's sad that in 2018 we're still talking about the same thing over and over," Smith-Pelly said. "It's sad that athletes like myself 30, 40 years ago were standing in the same spot saying the same thing. You'd think there'd be some sort of change or progression, but we're still working towards it I guess and we're going to keep working towards it."

The Capitals released the full interview.