Recalling the saga of Homer Thurman


Recalling the saga of Homer Thurman

Jerry Colangelo, who knows a lot of the history and tradition of Bloom Township's sports program and has written a lot of history of his own as the one-time owner of the Phoenix Suns of the NBA and the Arizona Diamondbacks baseball franchise, recalls with notes of sadness and admiration the last time he spent time with Homer Thurman.

Colangelo and Thurman were teammates on Bloom's 1957 basketball team that lost to Elgin 53-52 in the supersectional. Colangelo has said that it was the most disappointing loss he has ever experienced in his high school, college and professional sports career.

"When I was a sophomore at Illinois, I got permission from Tug Wilson (commissioner of the Big 10) to put on a summer tournament in Chicago Heights," said Colangelo, now director of USA Basketball. "I had the best players in the Midwest playing in the event. I was looking for Homer Thurman. I found him in jail. He looked scruffy and hadn't touched a basketball in so long.

"Well, he had a hamburger and some French fries and stepped on the court like he never missed a beat. He was the MVP in the tournament. He was an amazing story. He disappeared right after that. He is a tragic story, a great talent who went to waste."

Thurman arguably was one of the most outstanding multi-sport athletes ever produced in Illinois. Those who saw him compete in football, basketball and track and field insist he should be mentioned in the same discussion with Dike Eddleman, Lou Boudreau, Otto Graham, Ted Kluszewski, Jack Bastable, Mike Conley, LaMarr Thomas, Howard Jones, Quinn Buckner, Tai Streets, and his teammate at Bloom, Leroy Jackson.
"He occurred out of nowhere," Colangelo recalled. "He made the varsity as a freshman at Bloom at a time (in the 1950s) when the school was a factory for sports. It was no small feat. He ended up as a starter. He became one of the greatest athletes Bloom ever had.

"When he graduated from high school in 1959, in terms of talent, he was as talented an athlete as I had ever seen at that age. Unfortunately, he had other issues that went along with the package. But he could have had a terrific college career and maybe a professional career."

Thurman, a 6-foot-4, 225-pounder, was a two-time All-Stater in basketball. He scored 1,619 points in four years and averaged 17.59 per game.

He was a freshman on Bloom's 18-2 team in 1956 that lost to Oak Park 62-57 in the supersectional at Hinsdale, On a team with Colangelo, Bobby Bell and Chuck Green, he was the leading scorer with 20 points.

As a sophomore in 1957, Thurman and Bell each scored 15 points as Bloom lost to Elgin 53-52 in the supersectional at Hinsdale and finished 22-2.

He made enough of a lasting impression that he has been named among 10 players chosen in the second class in the pre-1960s era who will be inducted into the Illinois High School Basketball Hall of Fame and Museum in Pinckneyville. The class will be honored on Nov. 3 in Champaign.

He also was an All-State end on Bloom's unbeaten 1957 football team that featured All-State running back Leroy Jackson, a three-time state sprint champion who later played for the Washington Redskins in the NFL.

In track and field, he was third in the high jump I the 1957 state finals and won the event in 1958. He also led off the winning mile relay in 1958. As a senior, he was fifth in the long jump and ran a leg on the winning 880-yard relay. He competed on four state championship track and field teams.

Thurman was born in Ittabena, Mississippi. The family moved to Chicago Heights and settled on 13th Street and Shields. Homer was a high-strung and temperamental individual. Longtime friend Homer Dillard said his life changed when his mother died in 1959.

"He was never able to relax," Dillard said. "A lot of people in Chicago Heights liked him. But he had no supervision. So many people expected him to do so much. They said he would be the next Oscar Robertson. But when his mother died, something died in him. He didn't want to work as hard."

Thurman was recruited by Iowa during the time of the Connie Hawkins scandal. Homer left after one semester and landed at Midland Lutheran in Fremont, Nebraska. He was a black star in a white community. In 1962, he married Janet Bartling, the daughter of a local newspaper publisher. The couple went to Chicago to be married and to establish a residence. At the time, Thurman became a student at Crane College.

In November of 1962, Thurman had a tryout with the Harlem Globetrotters. He didn't make the team. At the same time, his personal life was crumbling. He left his wife and two children. In 1965, his wife was granted a divorce. She returned to Fremont to live with her parents and children.

"I was always able to find him and get him to play o one of my summer teams," said Dillard, a Bloom graduate of 1957. "But I last saw him in 1974. He was in a hurry. I spotted him walking on the side of the street. He had a cape on and looked like Dracula. A guitar hung around his neck. He said that he couldn't talk and that he'd see me later. I never saw him again.

"He decided he was going to be a musician. He had a guitar and a book to self-teach himself on the guitar. He spent a lot of time learning how to play the guitar. One story was he went to California to play with a band. He is like hearing stories about Elvis. One person saw him in a movie. Another person saw him here or there, a brief shot."

Dillard said Leroy Jackson, not Thurman, was the greatest athlete in Bloom history. But he was very good at everything he did. He didn't play baseball in high school but he was a very good baseball player, as well as basketball, football and track and field.

"In basketball, he was ahead of his time in a lot of things he was doing," Dillard said. "He had small hands. He couldn't palm the ball.

Whatever sport he picked, he could have done well. He had the type of concentration to do it. He was very intense whenever he decided to do something. He put himself into it. He would prepare himself to play a game. That's part of what made him a very good athlete."

Bobby Bell remembers his old teammate, Thurman. "The last I heard was his cousin told me he had seen him in San Francisco. I also heard he was dead. He was a sportsman. He could do it all. He was intelligent, a great natural talent. What went wrong with him was when his mother died and left him alone. Then he was on his own," Bell said.

Alan Macey, a sportswriter with the Chicago Heights Star and the Southtown Star from 1976 to 2011, tried to find Thurman.

Years ago, sports editor John E. Meyers of the Chicago Heights Star assigned Macey to do a series on the great athletes of the south suburbs titled "Do you remember?" Macey even put a former FBI agent on Thurman's trail but he kept running into one dead end after another.

"It was a very frustrating journey," Macey said. "The great Homer Thurman. Is he still alive? God only knows. He could be the greatest three-sport high school athlete who decided to be lost forever."

As Opening Day approaches, Cubs roster comes into focus


As Opening Day approaches, Cubs roster comes into focus

With less than a week until Opening Day, the Cubs' roster is all but set.

Joe Maddon told reporters in Arizona Friday the Cubs will roll with eight relievers to open the season, which doesn't come as any surprise. 

Left-handed pitcher Randy Rosario was optioned to Triple-A Iowa, leaving Eddie Butler and Shae Simmons as the two most likely guys to take the final bullpen spot.

Butler, 27, is out of minor-league options, which means if the Cubs do not keep him on their big-league roster, they risk losing him on waivers. Simmons still has two options remaining.

Butler also represents more starting pitching depth for the team beyond their five-man rotation and Mike Montgomery. Theo Epstein's front office likes to enter a season with 8-10 starting pitching options in case of injury, so it'd be hard to see the team getting rid of their No. 7 guy on that depth chart.

This spring, Butler has pitched 10 innings over five games with a 4.50 ERA and five strikeouts. He made 11 starts and two bullpen appearances with the 2017 Cubs, posting a 3.95 ERA and 1.43 WHIP.

Simmons, 27, signed with the Cubs as a free agent Feb. 16 and pitched nine games with the Seattle Mariners last year. He's appeared in four games for the Cubs this spring, pitching to a 2.45 ERA with five strikeouts in 3.2 innings.

In carrying eight relievers, that only leaves one position player spot available (backup catcher). Outfielder Peter Bourjos is expected to start the season in the minor leagues.

Veteran backstop Chris Gimenez will probably get the nod on the big-league roster over youngster Victor Caratini.

Gimenez comes with experience and a knowledge and relationship with Yu Darvish and we do have confirmation Darvish is making the Opening Day roster:

The Cubs really like Caratini and he's arguably their top position player prospect, but at age 24, he needs to play every day and see regular at-bats, which he wouldn't get backing up Willson Contreras in Chicago.

With that, here's the projected Cubs' Opening Day roster:


Willson Contreras
Chris Gimenez


Anthony Rizzo
Kris Bryant
Addison Russell
Javy Baez
Tommy La Stella
Ben Zobrist


Ian Happ
Kyle Schwarber
Albert Almora Jr.
Jason Heyward

Starting pitchers

Jon Lester
Kyle Hendricks
Yu Darvish
Jose Quintana
Tyler Chatwood


Brandon Morrow (closer)
Carl Edwards Jr.
Pedro Strop
Justin Wilson
Steve Cishek
Brian Duensing
Mike Montgomery
Eddie Butler

Plenty of possibilities loom ahead of Bears' draft pick

Plenty of possibilities loom ahead of Bears' draft pick

As the Bears begin to fill out their draft board in earnest, they’ll do so by evaluating the players they like and the players they think will be available when they pick eighth in April. And what players check both those boxes and go into their draft “clouds,” as Ryan Pace calls them, will depend largely on how many quarterbacks are taken ahead of the Bears’ pick. 

With about a month until the draft, it seems clear two teams will take a quarterback with a top-seven pick: the Cleveland Browns and New York Jets. The Browns own the Nos. 1 and 4 picks; the Jets traded up from No. 6 to No. 3, and teams rarely invest that kind of draft capital to not draft a quarterback. 

That leaves a few hinge points in how many quarterbacks are picked by the time the Bears are on the clock:

New York Giants (No. 2 overall)

The Giants still have an aging Eli Manning but could move to use the second pick to draft his long-term replacement. Or, alternatively, they could use this deep class of top-end quarterbacks as an avenue to trade down, add some picks and build out a young core that way. Either of these scenarios would be good news for the Bears, as we’ve seen Penn State running back Saquon Barkley, N.C. State defensive end Bradley Chubb and Notre Dame guard Quenton Nelson connected to the Giants at No. 2 as well, if they were to stay there. The Buffalo Bills could be motivated to trade up to No. 2 to make sure they get the guy they want with quarterbacks almost assuredly going off the board at Nos. 1 and 3. 

Cleveland Browns (No. 4 overall)

If the Browns get their quarterback with the first pick — Sam Darnold? — they could be sitting in an ideal spot at No. 4. If the Giants draft a quarterback, Cleveland could play hardball and tell teams they’re fine keeping the fourth pick and drafting Barkley with it. That could create a bidding war between the Buffalo Bills (No. 12) and Denver Broncos (No. 5) to trade up and draft the last of the four clear-cut top quarterbacks in this class. In this scenario, Cleveland adds a bunch of picks to an already-sizable stash and accelerates their growth through the draft. 

If the Giants were to trade out of the No. 2 pick, let’s say to the Bills, it may lessen Cleveland’s desire to trade down from No. 4 unless a team in need of a quarterback like the Arizona Cardinals (No. 15) or Miami Dolphins (No. 11) starts lurking around. But as we saw last year with the Bears trading up one spot to draft Mitch Trubisky, teams don’t want to leave things to chance if they have conviction on the quarterback they want. So that brings us to the…

Denver Broncos (No. 5 overall)

The Broncos signed Case Keenum to a two-year deal and still have 2016 first-round pick Paxton Lynch on their roster, though he hasn’t shown much in only five games as a pro. Does Denver absolutely, positively have to draft a quarterback? No. They’re probably in the same boat as the Giants in that regard. But what if they really like Josh Allen and/or Baker Mayfield, both of whom their coaching staff worked with at the Senior Bowl, and one of them is still on the board when the Browns’ pick comes up at No. 4? Or what if Josh Rosen has been their guy all along? 

In that case, John Elway may make an aggressive move to guarantee he gets the quarterback he wants, and not risk losing that guy if a team were to cut the line by trading with the Browns. 

The other scenario is less positive for the Bears: Maybe the Broncos only have one or two quarterbacks out of this group they want, and they either can’t find a trade partner to move out of No. 5 or don’t want to. If three quarterbacks are drafted in the first seven picks, the Bears may not have the opportunity to draft one of Nelson, Chubb or Alabama defensive back Minkah Fitzpatrick. That’s not necessarily a bad thing — Virginia Tech’s Tremaine Edmunds, for example, is a super-talented prospect — but we seem to be moving toward a consensus that Nelson, Fitzpatrick, Chubb and Barkley are the four best non-quarterback prospects in this draft. And in all likelihood, the Bears will only be able to draft one of them four quarterbacks are taken before they pick. 

The wild card here is Nelson, given his position (guard) is rarely seen as worthy of being a top-10 pick. But those who saw him up close in college believe he’s a future perennial Pro Bowler, possibly beginning as soon as his rookie year. The Bears’ fit is obvious, with Harry Hiestand coming to coach the offensive line from Notre Dame and the team — as of right now — still having a fairly clear need for another interior offensive lineman. Perhaps Nelson falls to the Bears even if there are only three quarterbacks off the board before they pick, but having four go off the board would make things a little less stressful at Halas Hall in late April. 

Indianapolis Colts (No. 6 overall) and Tampa Bay Buccaneers (No. 7 overall)

The Colts already traded down once, and likely did so with the confidence that Chubb would still be on the board at No. 6 to help their limp pass rush. Fitzpatrick seems to be a good fit with Tampa Bay, though a player of his caliber would be a good fit anywhere. Either of these teams still could be persuaded to trade down, especially if the Giants and/or Broncos pass on a quarterback.

Chicago Bears (No. 8 overall)

If four quarterbacks are off the board by the time the Bears pick, that’s ideal for Pace. If three are, he still could get someone from his No. 8 pick “cloud” and be content staying there. If only two are — and this doesn’t appear to be a likely scenario — that means the Bills haven’t found a trade partner and may want to leapfrog the Dolphins at No. 11 to get their guy. More likely, if the Bears are able to trade down from No. 8, it would be because a team like Arizona wants to make sure the quarterback they want isn’t snagged by an opportunistic team ahead of them. 

But Pace's draft history has seen him trade up far more frequently than trade down. If someone who's in his draft cloud is available when the Bears go on the clock, chances are he'll pick that guy and not trade down. 

Plenty can and will change between now and when the draft begins on April 26. But for right now, the landscape ahead of the Bears suggests only positive things setting up for their first-round pick.